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Hey everyone. So I had some weird noises coming from my rear diff while turning slow.

So I was just about to drain and replace my fluid....As I unscrewed the bottom drain plug a chunk of threaded metal fell off. It was cracked clean off, but surprisingly never leaked as there was the proper amount of fluid drained out.

So now I am stuck with a diff case that is no good. I tried that JB weld stuff to see if I could adhere it back together but as soon as I lightly tightened the drain bolt it popped right off.

Is it possible to just buy a new casing? Or would I have to replace the rear diff?
Is this going to be an expensive fix? Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

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May find a talented mechanic who could weld & machine some kind of solution.
I would do anything possible not to get stuck having to replace the whole assembly.
 

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Obviously the proper solution is a new casing.....
But I'm gonna give you the redneck version:
IF you can bond this back on by ANY means without having metal shavings deposited in the differential (do a drain & fill first); and it does not leak, then I'd say drain it, fill it, bond it (DON'T) try to turn the fill plug screw), and be on your way. You'll at least be good for the next 15K miles or so (depending on how long you're going between VTM-4 Service). That'll give you some time to locate a new (used) case, and perhaps save a few bucks doing so. This unit is not under pressure, so you should be able to get by fine w/o leaks. Can't hurt as a 'bridge' measure.

Otherwise, you could conceivably get a local weld shop to cobble a repair to reestablish your drain plug (or resonable facimile).

You'll only find the entire differential listed on the usual parts lists (about $2600), but I'd go see a dealer to ask them about getting just the casing..... it can't hurt to ask, but I'd be wary that you could get just the casing from Honda.... who knows! If you could, it should be easily less than a grand.
If you do find a casing anywhere, be sure to share your results here for others!

FYI, I once broke a chunk off a manual transmission housing on a Civic..... and just had a good aluminum welder put it back together.... it was 'slightly' off-square, but a little gasket material & I was good to go.
If you find yourself a good welder, he should be able to get you fixed up, presuming you can take out the unit & get it to him..... even if you have to fasten a new aluminum block with new threaded plug hole.
 

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Wow that should have never happened. So now something like this would have been better takin it into a dealer or else where to change and let them deal with the out come.
Lefty loosey righty tighty.
If one gets a half inch wrench or socket on anything without specs could be bad.
 

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Whoa Nellie..... I didn't notice before (must have been too early for me) that this was the BOTTOM plug! THAT is more likely to leak if you don't get a really good repair.
I'm thinking this could have been caused by hard contact with rock/curb/etc. Too bad in any case. It wouldn't have been so critical if it were the top hole/plug..... you'll have to get this repaired before you can drive it again, obviously.... MUCH more of a PIA.

Sympathies........
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the info everyone. I tried a crap ton of jb weld again.....which probly won't work. I may try a welder next then at last resort I'll get a new diff casing, which I am assuming will be expensive:(
 

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Thanks for all the info everyone. I tried a crap ton of jb weld again.....which probly won't work. I may try a welder next then at last resort I'll get a new diff casing, which I am assuming will be expensive:(
Check out car-parts.com. maybe they can locate a rear dif cover for you.
 

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That sucks..i am not sure there is a cover..it appears you are removing it to replace... But i certainly would try to find a welding specialty shop to see if possible.. Even the its a tough torque area..maybe make a new drain hole and try to cover this mess.. I dont know but man tough spot.either way if trying to repair must be clean, clean, clean prior..and the risk of it failing and destroying..but you may be doing that anyway

This link isnt giving me confidence either. http://www.toyota-4runner.org/probl...sfer-case-cracked-welders-opinion-wanted.html
 

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Find an experienced TIG welder...... Best results will result if you remove & completely drain the differential (no contaminants at welding site).
 

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Hey everyone. So I had some weird noises coming from my rear diff while turning slow.

So I was just about to drain and replace my fluid....As I unscrewed the bottom drain plug a chunk of threaded metal fell off. It was cracked clean off, but surprisingly never leaked as there was the proper amount of fluid drained out.

So now I am stuck with a diff case that is no good. I tried that JB weld stuff to see if I could adhere it back together but as soon as I lightly tightened the drain bolt it popped right off.

Is it possible to just buy a new casing? Or would I have to replace the rear diff?
Is this going to be an expensive fix? Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
Because this is a porous cast piece, getting it clean enough to accept any kind of JB Weld product will be next to impossible. Add to that, the housing bolt is located on the bottom, you really need to make sure any repair is done correctly.

Welding if possible, will require someone who knows how to weld (a professional) using a Nickel Cadmium filler rod. The draw-back is the rest of the housing will act like a heat sink which draws heat away from the weld at a rapid pace which could lead to hair-line cracks within the weld, and the surrounding housing area.

Two potential problems arise if welding is attempted. 1) The surrounding cast area will need to be heated which may damage any seals, which will require replacement. 2) Welding can only be done in small increments (about an inch at a time, then the welder needs to use a hammer to hit the weld to keep it from cracking. Hence, a professional welder with metallurgy experience is definitely needed! But this still doesn't guarantee success!

Personally I believe your best bet is to locate another complete unit and replace the broken one!

Hope this helps?
Silverstreek
 

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Because this is a porous cast piece, getting it clean enough to accept any kind of JB Weld product will be next to impossible. Add to that, the housing bolt is located on the bottom, you really need to make sure any repair is done correctly.

Welding if possible, will require someone who knows how to weld (a professional) using a Nickel Cadmium filler rod. The draw-back is the rest of the housing will act like a heat sink which draws heat away from the weld at a rapid pace which could lead to hair-line cracks within the weld, and the surrounding housing area.

Two potential problems arise if welding is attempted. 1) The surrounding cast area will need to be heated which may damage any seals, which will require replacement. 2) Welding can only be done in small increments (about an inch at a time, then the welder needs to use a hammer to hit the weld to keep it from cracking. Hence, a professional welder with metallurgy experience is definitely needed! But this still doesn't guarantee success!

Personally I believe your best bet is to locate another complete unit and replace the broken one!

Hope this helps?
Silverstreek
OK.... let me see if I can expose my welding ignorance :) .... I'm no expert, so forgive the 'loose' commentary:
This case IS aluminum, right? I'm not familiar with NiCad filler rod, but I'm guessing that might be for steel, or maybe brazing???? .... and I don't know if brazing is even an option for aluminum (reminder of my ignorance here).
There are shielded metal arc sticks available for aluminum, but I believe the best bet w/o question is shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), two methods of which are TIG (uses argon gas to shield hand held wire against corrosion from airborne oxygen), or MIG (which does the same thing, but with a center feed wire that emerges from the center of the gas rather than the hand held wire). TIG is less expensive (due to equipment), more portable, and more common/available I believe (again, I'm no expert).

I DO agree that a new case is best bet, but I'm also guessing that you may play hell finding one without losing a a couple of limbs ("arm & a leg").

I also fully agree that you need a professional to take on this task.... It may cost you a couple hundred bucks (again, really no clue here either), but it IS a path to recovery that won't send you into the many thousands of dollars that you might be facing with a new case.

FYI.... (this is REALLY old recollection)... I believe that you "may" be able to find a good TIG welder that will tell you he can "weld in place", or at least weld the case w/o dis-assembly of all the guts (which could be daunting). If I recall correctly, one of the benefits of TIG welding is that it can be done while minimizing heat introduced; compared to arc-welding steel anyway (smaller weld area and shorter 'bursts'... and taking longer to do the job). Find somebody to talk to about it & take your picture with you.
IF this is possible, you might want to prep this yourself.... create (grind/file) a nice interface to enable good/easy weld, and get yourself an idea of how the 'new' piece will be drilled/tapped for a new plug (be sure to mask off inside to exclude debris). Your welder/fab guy should be able to do this all, or coach you on how to prep for him.
Adventure time??? Good Luck.
 

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OK.... let me see if I can expose my welding ignorance :) .... I'm no expert, so forgive the 'loose' commentary:
This case IS aluminum, right? I'm not familiar with NiCad filler rod, but I'm guessing that might be for steel, or maybe brazing???? .... and I don't know if brazing is even an option for aluminum (reminder of my ignorance here).
There are shielded metal arc sticks available for aluminum, but I believe the best bet w/o question is shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), two methods of which are TIG (uses argon gas to shield hand held wire against corrosion from airborne oxygen), or MIG (which does the same thing, but with a center feed wire that emerges from the center of the gas rather than the hand held wire). TIG is less expensive (due to equipment), more portable, and more common/available I believe (again, I'm no expert).

I DO agree that a new case is best bet, but I'm also guessing that you may play hell finding one without losing a a couple of limbs ("arm & a leg").

I also fully agree that you need a professional to take on this task.... It may cost you a couple hundred bucks (again, really no clue here either), but it IS a path to recovery that won't send you into the many thousands of dollars that you might be facing with a new case.

FYI.... (this is REALLY old recollection)... I believe that you "may" be able to find a good TIG welder that will tell you he can "weld in place", or at least weld the case w/o dis-assembly of all the guts (which could be daunting). If I recall correctly, one of the benefits of TIG welding is that it can be done while minimizing heat introduced; compared to arc-welding steel anyway (smaller weld area and shorter 'bursts'... and taking longer to do the job). Find somebody to talk to about it & take your picture with you.
IF this is possible, you might want to prep this yourself.... create (grind/file) a nice interface to enable good/easy weld, and get yourself an idea of how the 'new' piece will be drilled/tapped for a new plug (be sure to mask off inside to exclude debris). Your welder/fab guy should be able to do this all, or coach you on how to prep for him.
Adventure time??? Good Luck.
If this was/is cast steel, as I said earlier, I would use a TIG welder using a Nickel-cadmium filler rod. If the differential is cast aluminum? (It looked like cast iron in the photo? If not? My mistake.) What do people say, blind in one eye, and can't see out of the other..... I have an excuse. :act024: Besides, I'm used to dealing with American Iron (literally!)

Welding machines. I have a nice Miller MIG welder with a spool gun I use for production aluminum welding. But, I couldn't use it for this kind of repair. I also have a nice Lincoln AC/DC welder that I wouldn't attempt using for this. However, for a repair like this I would use my Lincoln Invertec V250-S (TIG).

Welding cast aluminum presents it's own set of problems. 1) For such a large area, the size and thickness of the material of the differential itself will present such a huge heat-sink, the aluminum filler won't want to puddle. You won't get enough heat to make the weld stick.

2) The cast aluminum still needs to be heated to proper temperature before any welding can be attempted. Which again leads to excessive heat on the differential seals and gaskets! Please trust me even using a TIG which helps in keeping heat down, a good amount of heat is needed around the fractured area to do this job. Without heat, the differential will draw the heat out of the aluminum rod too fast, and it won't adhere.

3) To get the proper temp for welding cast aluminum, one can use a acetylene torch to blacken the area. Using the same torch, add air to the mix and heat the surrounding area until the black is completely gone. Using this method allows the welder to know the piece is heated to it's proper welding temp.

4) Also, before welding, the cast aluminum needs to be properly cleaned using something like a small die grinder. Where the pieces are broken, they should be chamfered on both sides of the fracture to allow for proper build up of the filler rod. The problem here is the threaded area of the plug. Although small, the mating surfaces need to be perfectly aligned to keep oil from leaking at the plug.

My background is in welding. I have been hands on since 1973. Looking at this, I believe this repair isn't as easy as some make it out to be. Joey should speak to a reputable welder. One who has seen the problem, and one who has dealt with this type of repair before with success. And even then, they may be told there are no guarantees! But, it may save Joey time and aggravation in the end. Isn't this what this forum is all about? Helping out?

Silverstreek
 

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Cannot wait to see the outcome of this.. Heh silverstreak.. I have a mig welder lincoln..always wanted to try tig..what would you recommend for a garage to learn? Decent quality but nor industrial commercial if you know what i mean..

Thanks!
 

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The threads on the plug that hes holding doesnt look that bad. Isnt their some way he could just try to retrieve the pieces and every thing out of the housing. Isnt it just the magnet and a few threads missing on the piece hes holding? Thats why I thought he may have went the wrong way when trying to remove it and it snapped, just a thought. Good pics but I guess you half to see it in person.
Edit- Joey if your still around ....... Dont know where your from but there is a "06" with 127,000 miles on it thats being parted out in the Twin Cities, if that might help. Front end crash damage from what I see.
 

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I would go for the 'band-aid' fix first. Finding just a case, or removing one from a wrecked RL is a possibility, but I think a junk yard would want to sell the whole unit.

If you do get just a case somehow, then you have to change out the guts. I don't think that will be breeze. Plus, you want to make sure the used case does not have any cracks, or other faults that could end up being a bigger nightmare.
 

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Cannot wait to see the outcome of this.. Heh silverstreak.. I have a mig welder lincoln..always wanted to try tig..what would you recommend for a garage to learn? Decent quality but nor industrial commercial if you know what i mean..

Thanks!
Sorry for the delay.....

I may not have an answer that is good enough? I wish I did! Your question totally depends on how much money do you want to spend, and what are you looking to get out of a TIG? Hopefully some of the pitfalls are answered below for you?

Cheaper TIG's have aluminum coils in them that won't stand up to heavy use. More expensive TIG's give you many options and are better quality.

Also watch out for a great price on a TIG, but you have to purchase items to weld separately. Then the question comes in, do I buy new or used? Sometimes you can find a nice heavy duty TIG for a decent price used, but not used up!

A more expensive TIG with the right options will allow you to Stick AC DC Arc weld, TIG Weld, and Plasma Cutter. But, you're talking around three grand plus for something like that.

If you have a local welding supply business, you can gain a ton of information by speaking to them about exactly what your requirements may be in purchasing a TIG? I would suggest speaking to a knowledgeable sales rep, which helps tremendously! I do it all of the time, plus with the advancement of welding machines and materials, I find I learn quite a bit which saves me time, money, and aggravation! Plus, you can usually put your hands on the actual machine you're interested in! (Just watch out, I have a tendency to be like a kid in a candy store when I visit my local welding supply shop :act024:

There is a website usaweld.com that may give you an idea about some of their HTP machines. The cheapest is below a grand, but again, you'll end up spending another $500.00 plus for the torch, foot pedal, and other needed accessories before you even start your first attempt at welding aluminum. But, this machine may not be heavy enough for what you may want to weld?

Personally, once I did the research and found out exactly what I wanted. I would look at places like E-bay to find a clean used TIG with all of the needed accessories. That in my mind would be the biggest bang for the buck! I purchased my Lincoln used. Although I don't use it that often. Always remember, It's better to have it and not need it, than it is to need it and not have it!

Hope this helps?
Silverstreek
 

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You should be able to get it welded, by a professional . The guy we use at our work place says he welds about one oil drain plug a month on honda 4 wheelers, a real common problem for them and almost identical to this.
 

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Sorry for the delay.....

I may not have an answer that is good enough? I wish I did! Your question totally depends on how much money do you want to spend, and what are you looking to get out of a TIG? Hopefully some of the pitfalls are answered below for you?

Cheaper TIG's have aluminum coils in them that won't stand up to heavy use. More expensive TIG's give you many options and are better quality.

Also watch out for a great price on a TIG, but you have to purchase items to weld separately. Then the question comes in, do I buy new or used? Sometimes you can find a nice heavy duty TIG for a decent price used, but not used up!

A more expensive TIG with the right options will allow you to Stick AC DC Arc weld, TIG Weld, and Plasma Cutter. But, you're talking around three grand plus for something like that.

If you have a local welding supply business, you can gain a ton of information by speaking to them about exactly what your requirements may be in purchasing a TIG? I would suggest speaking to a knowledgeable sales rep, which helps tremendously! I do it all of the time, plus with the advancement of welding machines and materials, I find I learn quite a bit which saves me time, money, and aggravation! Plus, you can usually put your hands on the actual machine you're interested in! (Just watch out, I have a tendency to be like a kid in a candy store when I visit my local welding supply shop :act024:

There is a website usaweld.com that may give you an idea about some of their HTP machines. The cheapest is below a grand, but again, you'll end up spending another $500.00 plus for the torch, foot pedal, and other needed accessories before you even start your first attempt at welding aluminum. But, this machine may not be heavy enough for what you may want to weld?

Personally, once I did the research and found out exactly what I wanted. I would look at places like E-bay to find a clean used TIG with all of the needed accessories. That in my mind would be the biggest bang for the buck! I purchased my Lincoln used. Although I don't use it that often. Always remember, It's better to have it and not need it, than it is to need it and not have it!

Hope this helps?
Silverstreek
Thanks! Looking at chinese ahp200x 2015 model..if i get anxious i may bite or save for a usa made one..looks like a grinding wheel and another bottle are my added costs..
 
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