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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I'm redoing a horribly botched stereo install on my 2008 Ridgeline RTS and I have a few questions, please:

First I'll pose my questions to you out of respect for your time. Extra photos, background info, and details about my project are at the bottom of this post. Thanks in advance for your help and respectful feedback. I will be glad to also post some photos when I am all done, and of course am happy to provide any info or answer questions about what I've done to my Ridgeline.

My questions about the rear wall are:
1) Which holes in the rear cabin wall can be safely sealed? Which are necessary for ventilation? Which will let in significant noise or fumes?

2) From the photos of the rear wall, do you see anything that has been modified or is of concern? I see that several holes were covered up by the previous installer with dyna-mat. There are 7 factory threaded holes in the rear wall and I'm not sure what is intended to be mounted there (3 M6 on drivers side, 2 M6 center, and 2 larger threaded holes near the floor). Additionally two large 4-5" holes in the center and passenger side were also sealed with dyna-mat. Finally, it appears that the round cover in the floor has been dented. What is this for? Access to change the fuel pump maybe?

3) Besides sound butyl/foil dampening mat (dynamat) for panel vibration, what are your recommendations for sound barrier insulation that are not too expensive? My OEM cover for the rear wall has been cut off just below the seatbelt pre-tensioner, and I am leaning towards omitting it and replacing it with some sort of mass-loaded-vinyl+foam sheet like Dynapad, Stinger Roadkill Carpet Pad, or Second Skin Luxury Liner Pro. Thoughts? Also, should I fill large holes with foam (similar to OEM foam in bottom corners), seal them up with dynamat, or what? Any recommendations on material to use and where to source it from?

4) What layer in the sandwich would I place the sound mat? Currently the layers are: Wall -> backing/mounting panels -> amp racks -> amp. Should I install it between the wall and backer panels that my amp racks mount to, between the backer panel and rack, between the rack and amps, or on top of the amps and everything else kinda like OEM? If the latter, I'm not sure the amps would have enough ventilation

Photo showing back wall and holes.


Same photo, just marked up:


Photo showing the bent access panel (center) that I am unsure of. Also, one of the open holes I'm not sure how/if to treat (bottom right):


Photo showing how I am mounting my equipment. I am using 3/4" plywood as a mounting/backing plate. On top of that will be 3/4" plywood amp/equipment trays. The passenger side mounting panel (left) and half of the driver side panel (right) are using the M6 factory threaded holes I marked in the above photo:



Background and details:
I am redoing a botched installation of a system on my 2008 Ridgeline that I had installed by a shop in Scottsdale, AZ around 2009. Even though the headunit, speakers, amps, and sub were all high quality, it sounded "just OK". About 3 weeks ago, when investigating an issue with the head-unit squeaking and rattling, I discovered problem after problem with the previous installer's work. The mistakes I found were dangerous and upsetting. One thing lead to another and now I have the interior disassembled, the audio system completely ripped out, and have re-done almost everything. This has turned into a huge undertaking but all I have left is to mount all my panels and equipment and do the wiring. Before I do that final work, I need to understand the back wall better: ventilation, service maintenance for fuel pump or whatever that access panel is in the floor, soundproofing, and what else may have been modified that isn't correct.

The work of the past installer was so bad! To name just a few problems:
  • An inverter was installed with unprotected high voltage wiring sandwiched between the bare metal floor and carpet padding, directly under the driver's feet, with a hacked remote 120V outlet un-insulated behind the center console.
  • The JL W8V3 sub was too deep to fit in the custom enclosure they built, so they simply cut the back of the box open around the magnet and carpeted and dyna-matted over the hole.
  • The Dynamat job of the back wall was very sloppy and covered OEM wiring harnesses, holes, and the rear window cables.
  • Aftermarket Backup camera and rear view mirror wired to headunit power awfully, also with unprotected wires on chassis bare metal and under feet.
  • OEM harnesses spliced into sloppily with just electrical tape.
System Components:
  • Pioneer AVH-4100NEX headunit (upgraded from Kenwood unit around 2013-14)
  • JL C5-075ct tweeters in dash.
  • JL C5-650x coaxial speakers in front doors.
  • JL C5-525x coaxial speakers in rear doors.
  • JL 500/1 Amplifier
  • JL 300/4 Amplifier
  • JL 8W3V3-8 in an awfully made box replaced with...
New Components:
  • To-Be-Determined: sub enclosure(s) installed under seat(s). Removable and small enough to fit in the trunk: probably 1 or 2 JL CP108LG-W3v3. Powered by existing JL 500/1.
  • Kicker 6.75" CompRT 4 Ohm Enclosure in stock location in order to have something for bass when above boxes are removed.
  • JL Audio MX500/1 amp powering sub behind seat.
  • JL Audio TWK-88 DSP (tweeters and front door speakers in active setup using Jl 300/4, and rear speakers powered by headunit)
  • New RCA's and speaker and power wiring mostly from KnuKonceptz
All photos I took from the install can be found here:


Thanks for reading!
-gg
 

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Discussion Starter #2
A bit more progress today. Painted the mounting plates and equipment racks and did a (hopefully) final installation of them. I think any soundproofing treatment will be in front of the amps because I really don't want to have to remove everything again, and I am optimistic that there will be plenty of air movement in this area due to the vents.

Final results for today:



More pictures on the google photos link below.
 

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I can't see your pictures in the thread. I can only see them if I follow your link.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I can't see your pictures in the thread. I can only see them if I follow your link.
Ok. Thanks for letting me know. They are big high res files so they are probably loading too slow. I should resize them smaller. Thanks again.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

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Hi all. I'm redoing a horribly botched stereo install on my 2008 Ridgeline RTS and I have a few questions, please:

First I'll pose my questions to you out of respect for your time. Extra photos, background info, and details about my project are at the bottom of this post. Thanks in advance for your help and respectful feedback. I will be glad to also post some photos when I am all done, and of course am happy to provide any info or answer questions about what I've done to my Ridgeline.

My questions about the rear wall are:
1) Which holes in the rear cabin wall can be safely sealed? Which are necessary for ventilation? Which will let in significant noise or fumes?

2) From the photos of the rear wall, do you see anything that has been modified or is of concern? I see that several holes were covered up by the previous installer with dyna-mat. There are 7 factory threaded holes in the rear wall and I'm not sure what is intended to be mounted there (3 M6 on drivers side, 2 M6 center, and 2 larger threaded holes near the floor). Additionally two large 4-5" holes in the center and passenger side were also sealed with dyna-mat. Finally, it appears that the round cover in the floor has been dented. What is this for? Access to change the fuel pump maybe?

3) Besides sound butyl/foil dampening mat (dynamat) for panel vibration, what are your recommendations for sound barrier insulation that are not too expensive? My OEM cover for the rear wall has been cut off just below the seatbelt pre-tensioner, and I am leaning towards omitting it and replacing it with some sort of mass-loaded-vinyl+foam sheet like Dynapad, Stinger Roadkill Carpet Pad, or Second Skin Luxury Liner Pro. Thoughts? Also, should I fill large holes with foam (similar to OEM foam in bottom corners), seal them up with dynamat, or what? Any recommendations on material to use and where to source it from?

4) What layer in the sandwich would I place the sound mat? Currently the layers are: Wall -> backing/mounting panels -> amp racks -> amp. Should I install it between the wall and backer panels that my amp racks mount to, between the backer panel and rack, between the rack and amps, or on top of the amps and everything else kinda like OEM? If the latter, I'm not sure the amps would have enough ventilation

Photo showing back wall and holes.


Same photo, just marked up:


Photo showing the bent access panel (center) that I am unsure of. Also, one of the open holes I'm not sure how/if to treat (bottom right):


Photo showing how I am mounting my equipment. I am using 3/4" plywood as a mounting/backing plate. On top of that will be 3/4" plywood amp/equipment trays. The passenger side mounting panel (left) and half of the driver side panel (right) are using the M6 factory threaded holes I marked in the above photo:



Background and details:
I am redoing a botched installation of a system on my 2008 Ridgeline that I had installed by a shop in Scottsdale, AZ around 2009. Even though the headunit, speakers, amps, and sub were all high quality, it sounded "just OK". About 3 weeks ago, when investigating an issue with the head-unit squeaking and rattling, I discovered problem after problem with the previous installer's work. The mistakes I found were dangerous and upsetting. One thing lead to another and now I have the interior disassembled, the audio system completely ripped out, and have re-done almost everything. This has turned into a huge undertaking but all I have left is to mount all my panels and equipment and do the wiring. Before I do that final work, I need to understand the back wall better: ventilation, service maintenance for fuel pump or whatever that access panel is in the floor, soundproofing, and what else may have been modified that isn't correct.

The work of the past installer was so bad! To name just a few problems:
  • An inverter was installed with unprotected high voltage wiring sandwiched between the bare metal floor and carpet padding, directly under the driver's feet, with a hacked remote 120V outlet un-insulated behind the center console.
  • The JL W8V3 sub was too deep to fit in the custom enclosure they built, so they simply cut the back of the box open around the magnet and carpeted and dyna-matted over the hole.
  • The Dynamat job of the back wall was very sloppy and covered OEM wiring harnesses, holes, and the rear window cables.
  • Aftermarket Backup camera and rear view mirror wired to headunit power awfully, also with unprotected wires on chassis bare metal and under feet.
  • OEM harnesses spliced into sloppily with just electrical tape.
System Components:
  • Pioneer AVH-4100NEX headunit (upgraded from Kenwood unit around 2013-14)
  • JL C5-075ct tweeters in dash.
  • JL C5-650x coaxial speakers in front doors.
  • JL C5-525x coaxial speakers in rear doors.
  • JL 500/1 Amplifier
  • JL 300/4 Amplifier
  • JL 8W3V3-8 in an awfully made box replaced with...
New Components:
  • To-Be-Determined: sub enclosure(s) installed under seat(s). Removable and small enough to fit in the trunk: probably 1 or 2 JL CP108LG-W3v3. Powered by existing JL 500/1.
  • Kicker 6.75" CompRT 4 Ohm Enclosure in stock location in order to have something for bass when above boxes are removed.
  • JL Audio MX500/1 amp powering sub behind seat.
  • JL Audio TWK-88 DSP (tweeters and front door speakers in active setup using Jl 300/4, and rear speakers powered by headunit)
  • New RCA's and speaker and power wiring mostly from KnuKonceptz
All photos I took from the install can be found here:


Thanks for reading!
-gg
Does the all that equipment fit without any problem with the back seat install completely and buttoned up?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So far I have had a successful test fit with everything. One thing I learned that was helpful for me to assess what would fit was to remove a key piece of the trim: This is the cover underneath the armrest. It is removed by first removing the back seat, then the center headrest. There are two pieces of plastic that retain this cover that also act as sheaths for the the headrest posts to insert into. Then, the cover can be slowly and carefully pulled out vertically from the top. Once the cover was out, I did a test fit of the back seat, and I was able to look through the armrest to see how much clearance I had for all the equipment.

I have also seen photos that have shown that people have separated the backrest from the seat bottoms, and this seems to also give a good view of what can fit, albeit with more guess-work required on where the backrest would be.

As far as an update on progress, I have stalled out a bit. The MX500/1 amp you see in the photos was not reaching target voltage when setting my gains. I talked to JL Audio support and they believe I got a bad amp, so I returned it. I wasn't able to locally source a replacement amp that would fit so I bought a new one on-line for a great deal. It is a Rockford Fosgate T750X1BD (screenshot on the deal below) and should be arriving today. In the meantime I need to solder in my bass blockers for my tweeters to protect them in the active setup, install my circuit breakers for the subwoofer amps in a spot that is accessible with the seat installed, and maybe a little tidying of wires if possible before the amp is installed.

I'll add some more photos today as well. I still haven't figured out what to do for soundproofing, and I decided to re-seal the 5" holes in the back wall. Any advice on those questions I posed earlier would be appreciated.

Amp deal:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Final gains set and some tests run today. There were a few things to consider including the JL DSP adjustment knob I set up to control the 2 sub levels. I decided on setting gains with the sub volumes knobs at 50% so I could still be able to crank the bass at lower system volumes and to make up for tracks that are needing a bass boost (ACDC Back in Black for example).

I also figured out where to install my breakers for the 2 sub amps and mounted and wired them. Hopefully the 40amp breakers will not trip when listening loudly

Yesterday, I addressed some rattling that was due to the way I had mounted the sub with brackets. I remounted the box from the inside of the box, to the back wall. It was kind of a pain to get the woofer and radiator out but it was worth it to get the box mounted firmly against the back wall and floor. I also used some sound deadener between the box and the truck surfaces.

Probably about a half day more work to finish this up. All I have left is to neaten up the wiring, put the seat and trim back in, and clean up. Then I'll be able to do some tuning with REW and the JL DSP and get it all dialed in. I can't wait for that.

Attaching a photo of the end result for today. Lots of other photos as well on the Google photos link above.



 

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Discussion Starter #8
Review of the Kicker 6.75" CompRT 4 Ohm Loaded Enclosure

400202


Peeking inside the sub box revealed that this little 6.75" kicker sub box is built extremely well with tons of bracing, polyfill, and foam insulating the high quality wiring. A lot of excessive and messy glue is present, but now I'm nitpicking a loaded sub enclosure costing under $150 (I paid $115 shipped from Crutchfield Outlet).

It sounds great too: A kick drum sounds excellent on it, and it can even get pretty loud at that frequency range. A track with changing lower frequency oscillation (like Sade's No Ordinary Love) sounds pretty decent, but the sub cannot handle more than medium volume. Same goes for rap (I tested Eazy-E Boyz-n-The-Hood): It does sound good, and all the audible low frequencies seem to be there, but it won't get loud. The response completely falls off below 32Hz, which is not shocking for this super tiny woofer and enclosure. Still, having >35Hz sound decent on this tiny, cheap thing is a shining engineering success. To summarize, it is not super loud, but it will provide plenty of bass at medium listening volumes with seemingly no missing audible frequencies. However, if you want to crank the low frequency range at loud volumes, you'll need another sub as it would be too easy to overpower this little guy and damage it.

Here's a compelling idea: I think a Ridgeline would probably fit 2 of these behind the seat, which would likely increase the overall output to beyond adequate. Heck, 3 might even fit with this tiny Rockford amp mounted on top or to the side of one of the subs.

I'm still going to supplement the little guy with an under-seat sub. Again, I only installed the 6.75" because I wanted to have something for bass if/when I temporarily removed the under-seat box. For me, going without bass is like going without coffee in the morning. It can be done, but I get a little cranky.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Has anyone had any success in quieting the rattling internals of the center seat belt pulley?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
A lot more photos have been added to the google photos link. I wasn't happy with the tweeters in the stock locations so I am installing them in the A-Pillars. I also have added 2 JL CP108-W3V3 subs. I tried a whole bunch out at a local shop and although 1 of these was not impressive, 2 blew my socks off with both output and sound quality. I am sure a a good custom box would sound better, but the versatility of having 2 and being able to put one or both in the trunk, ease of install, convenience of buying local, plus the potential resale value had me sold. I am trying to figure out the best way to mount those to allow for safety in an accident as well as ease of removal.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Everything turned out great. I finished what I will call the final tunes yesterday. I still need to figure out a polished way of securing the subwoofers to the floor. I am probably going to need to fabricate a bracket to use as tie down points. I am thinking about using the bolt for the center seat belt anchor for that. I would like it to be super secure but also easy to remove one or both of the subwoofers for storage. I am thinking of making sort of a clamshell type bracket out of sheet metal that will surround the subwoofer box and secure to the tie down point I make. Any ideas, please let me know.
 

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Dzus fasteners can be used in innovative ways to make very secure, easily removed (some types requiring no tools) mounting points for a variety of projects ....


Just one 'widget' for your toolbox of ideas ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks. Never heard of or seen those before. I'll file that info away for a future project.

This is another idea but I don't really want to drill into my floor.
401051
 

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Thanks. Never heard of or seen those before. I'll file that info away for a future project.
No worries! My initial thought was a small bracket using an existing point such as a seat bolt with the flush female part of a dzus on that small bracket; then a strap / bracket on the sub-enclosure that aligns to that with the male part of the dzus; the dzus just a clean tool-less way to firmly tie 'em together when you have the sub installed or quickly disconnect to remove it, with no alteration of anything OE.

If you want front and back 'tiedown' for the sub, maybe something similar sandwiched under the seat-leg rails using their mounting bolts.

Anyhoo, lots of ways to solve this challenge, Have Fun !
 
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