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Happened only once. 2001. I was in a 1992 Honda Civic Si hatchback. I have owned a NSX (Gen 1), S2000, STI, FoRS, and many more sports or performance cars. But the '92 Si was one of the best cars I have ever owned. It was light, handled extremely well and was extremely reliable. But I hit 150k, and after putting a new distributor (I think that is what it was called), new CV joints and boots, new timing belt, etc, etc, I got my first well paying position 49 miles away from home. I just didn't feel comfortable commuting in a 150k mile vehicle at that time. I wanted something under warranty for that long commute. I tried to trade it in on a '99 Civic Si coupe but since they didn't make it any more, all the local dealers were gouging on used ones, and I hated the blue they all came in. So reluctantly I decided on a new Honda Civic sedan with a manual. Brand new car, brand new warranty. I made it 6 months with that car. The suspension was terrible, so floaty in the corners and overpasses I would have sworn it was not a Honda. 6 months later I traded it in on a RSX Type S. The first silver one in the metroplex. I paid just under MSRP, and took a few thousand dollar hit on the Civic EX. The RSX was low 20k range and I lost 2-3k on the Civic EX which wasn't an expensive car in the first place so while I was pissed at making the mistake, it wasn't 5k or 10k or anything like that.

I learned once, and only once, to buy once, and cry once. That single mistake gained me the experience I needed to never do it again. Ever since I test drive, read, research, and never buy a first model year (these days I won't buy even a second year model, year 3 or longer).

My advice. Hunt, deal, and mitigate the losses and switch. You'll have to work your rear end off but I'm confident you'll find something to mitigate the losses. Best of luck.
 

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Happened only once. 2001. I was in a 1992 Honda Civic Si hatchback. I have owned a NSX (Gen 1), S2000, STI, FoRS, and many more sports or performance cars. But the '92 Si was one of the best cars I have ever owned. It was light, handled extremely well and was extremely reliable. But I hit 150k, and after putting a new distributor (I think that is what it was called), new CV joints and boots, new timing belt, etc, etc, I got my first well paying position 49 miles away from home. I just didn't feel comfortable commuting in a 150k mile vehicle at that time. I wanted something under warranty for that long commute. I tried to trade it in on a '99 Civic Si coupe but since they didn't make it any more, all the local dealers were gouging on used ones, and I hated the blue they all came in. So reluctantly I decided on a new Honda Civic sedan with a manual. Brand new car, brand new warranty. I made it 6 months with that car. The suspension was terrible, so floaty in the corners and overpasses I would have sworn it was not a Honda. 6 months later I traded it in on a RSX Type S. The first silver one in the metroplex. I paid just under MSRP, and took a few thousand dollar hit on the Civic EX. The RSX was low 20k range and I lost 2-3k on the Civic EX which wasn't an expensive car in the first place so while I was pissed at making the mistake, it wasn't 5k or 10k or anything like that.

I learned once, and only once, to buy once, and cry once. That single mistake gained me the experience I needed to never do it again. Ever since I test drive, read, research, and never buy a first model year (these days I won't buy even a second year model, year 3 or longer).

My advice. Hunt, deal, and mitigate the losses and switch. You'll have to work your rear end off but I'm confident you'll find something to mitigate the losses. Best of luck.
Great advice, IMO. Drove some dogs when I had to, financially, and while I don't overtly spurge, not willing to drive something long-term that I don't like. Conversely, if I like it and it holds up (like my '02 CRV and '07 G1) I'll hang onto it a long time.

How was the S2000 for you? Always thought that was a nice-looking machine.
 

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Happened twice! I traded my 06 RTL for a ‘12 Honda Crosstour (mostly due to a killer year end deal and major maintenance due on the Ridge). Had “fun” with the Crosstour for about 3 months. Kept it for about a year and with rumors the Ridgeline would not be produced I jumped into a ‘14 Sport. Had the Sport for a few years but with gas consistently over $3.50 the pain from the pump was too much and I jumped into a ‘17 Acura ILX. After deciding that gravity was not my friend getting out of that darned thing (about 8 months) I took the worlds biggest financial bath and traded into my ‘18 Sport. Needless to say trading isn’t an option now nor am I interested.


Has anyone on here ever bought a new vehicle, then regretted it after driving it a few weeks?

I traded my RL for a new car and after 3 weeks, I want my RL back. The dealer still has it on the used car lot. If you've ever done this, how big of a bath did you take to get your previous vehicle back, if you got it back at all?

I know, I know. But please spare me the "I told you so" stuff. I get enough of that from the spousal unit.

Anyone? Anyone?
 

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So far, I've owned 30 vehicles in 30 years. The one I regret most was a new 2019 Acura RDX I bought a couple of years ago. It was a lemon and I missed the 2017 Ridgeline I traded for it. A few months later, it cost me another $5,000 to trade back for another new 2019 Ridgeline exactly like the 2017 I had. Now, it's a lemon. I plan to dump it in the next 18,000 miles before the warranty is up and leave the Honda brand because of their products and attitude. The Honda of today is not the same Honda I fell in love with. That's a shame because the Ridgeline is an extremely useful vehicle and whatever I buy next will likely require more sacrifices, but I can't keep rewarding a company who demonstrates zero desire to retain my business.
--
What was the issue with your 2019 that turned it into a lemon ?
 

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What was the issue with your 2019 that turned it into a lemon ?
You can read more here...

 

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Great advice, IMO. Drove some dogs when I had to, financially, and while I don't overtly spurge, not willing to drive something long-term that I don't like. Conversely, if I like it and it holds up (like my '02 CRV and '07 G1) I'll hang onto it a long time.

How was the S2000 for you? Always thought that was a nice-looking machine.
I ride sportbikes, have for a little over 20 years. The f20c motor in the S2000 was always something that enthusiasts ooooh'd and awww'd about. I never thought it was anything special. It's gutless until VTEC, and like most Honda N/A inline 4's, just no torque. As a motorcyclist, primarily literbikes, it was just a big displacement bike motor, or I should say similar to a 600cc sportbike with nothing in it until high in the revs but a much lower redline. I live in TX so the drop top, as I discovered, could rarely be used. It's either too damn hot and humid, or too cold. If I was lucky I'd get 1-2 weeks in the fall, and 1-2 weeks in the spring, where I could drop the top and enjoy it. Top up or down, it's loud as hell inside. The car taught me that convertibles are not for me. I briefly thought about buying the factory hard top. Went for a ride in a s2000 forum member's that had the hard top, and it was still too damn loud. And removing that f'er by myself, was too much effort for me. Now the handling was excellent, it's a true driver's car, but it suffers from snap oversteer. Push it too hard, the car won't let you know as the limit approaches, or not enough for me. It was a real wakeup call pushing the car on track, and the next thing you know I"m doing 360's and luckily just hit the dirt/kitty litter and had a hell of a wash and clean afterwards. The brakes in combination with the chassis was one of the best I've owned. And what I mean by that, is you could wait literally to the last second to make a turn, jam on the brakes hard, then make the right or the turn on the track. Certain things it was very good at. But overall I preferred the NSX even the 5spd version I owned briefly. The NSX with that beautiful V6 wailing behind your ears, I just loved the NSX much more. But I bought it for an investment and flipped it and didn't own it long. I regret that. That same car I owned 16 years ago is worth much more than I paid for it. Now the S2000's are creeping up price now as well. My S2000 would be worth more than I paid for it new today.

But I don't regret selling either. I have my sportbikes for outright performance in fair weather. There is no way on this Earth, on a nice day, that I'd grab the keys to a sports or performance car over one of my motorcycles. Nothing on this planet is as fun to me or more rewarding than being suited up, braking for a corner, leaning the bike way over, hitting the apex, then leaning it back up enough to have that credit card sized contact patch on the rear tire and going WFO out of corner. It's like being shot out of a rifle. Better than sex to me. My own personal roller coaster. No traction control. no riding nannies, and I have to use all 4 limbs to do it. Takes utter concentration, training, and tons of experience to be able to do it every weekend like I do.

Sports or performance cars, I just prefer AWD, in fact for any car/truck I prefer AWD. In a car, like say my FoRS, well I tracked that car in Utah while snow was falling and I was on MPSS. I love the inclement weather driving capability of a performance AWD car, especially the rain. I've driven 100's of days in my STI and FoRS where it's literally the fastest and safest thing on the road. I'm looking forward to the new STI that will debut next year and I'm hoping Honda will make the CTR with their excellent SH-AWD setup. My dream car was just made by Toyota/Gazoo, the Yaris GR-4 with front and rear diffs. Small, light weight, driving modes, diffs, but Toyo USA said no to bringing it here. So I wait for my next performance car which will likely be my last as I don't think they will made much longer, well anything under 50k.
 

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I ride sportbikes, have for a little over 20 years. The f20c motor in the S2000 was always something that enthusiasts ooooh'd and awww'd about. I never thought it was anything special. It's gutless until VTEC, and like most Honda N/A inline 4's, just no torque. As a motorcyclist, primarily literbikes, it was just a big displacement bike motor, or I should say similar to a 600cc sportbike with nothing in it until high in the revs but a much lower redline. I live in TX so the drop top, as I discovered, could rarely be used. It's either too damn hot and humid, or too cold. If I was lucky I'd get 1-2 weeks in the fall, and 1-2 weeks in the spring, where I could drop the top and enjoy it. Top up or down, it's loud as hell inside. The car taught me that convertibles are not for me. I briefly thought about buying the factory hard top. Went for a ride in a s2000 forum member's that had the hard top, and it was still too damn loud. And removing that f'er by myself, was too much effort for me. Now the handling was excellent, it's a true driver's car, but it suffers from snap oversteer. Push it too hard, the car won't let you know as the limit approaches, or not enough for me. It was a real wakeup call pushing the car on track, and the next thing you know I"m doing 360's and luckily just hit the dirt/kitty litter and had a hell of a wash and clean afterwards. The brakes in combination with the chassis was one of the best I've owned. And what I mean by that, is you could wait literally to the last second to make a turn, jam on the brakes hard, then make the right or the turn on the track. Certain things it was very good at. But overall I preferred the NSX even the 5spd version I owned briefly. The NSX with that beautiful V6 wailing behind your ears, I just loved the NSX much more. But I bought it for an investment and flipped it and didn't own it long. I regret that. That same car I owned 16 years ago is worth much more than I paid for it. Now the S2000's are creeping up price now as well. My S2000 would be worth more than I paid for it new today.

But I don't regret selling either. I have my sportbikes for outright performance in fair weather. There is no way on this Earth, on a nice day, that I'd grab the keys to a sports or performance car over one of my motorcycles. Nothing on this planet is as fun to me or more rewarding than being suited up, braking for a corner, leaning the bike way over, hitting the apex, then leaning it back up enough to have that credit card sized contact patch on the rear tire and going WFO out of corner. It's like being shot out of a rifle. Better than sex to me. My own personal roller coaster. No traction control. no riding nannies, and I have to use all 4 limbs to do it. Takes utter concentration, training, and tons of experience to be able to do it every weekend like I do.

Sports or performance cars, I just prefer AWD, in fact for any car/truck I prefer AWD. In a car, like say my FoRS, well I tracked that car in Utah while snow was falling and I was on MPSS. I love the inclement weather driving capability of a performance AWD car, especially the rain. I've driven 100's of days in my STI and FoRS where it's literally the fastest and safest thing on the road. I'm looking forward to the new STI that will debut next year and I'm hoping Honda will make the CTR with their excellent SH-AWD setup. My dream car was just made by Toyota/Gazoo, the Yaris GR-4 with front and rear diffs. Small, light weight, driving modes, diffs, but Toyo USA said no to bringing it here. So I wait for my next performance car which will likely be my last as I don't think they will made much longer, well anything under 50k.
Wow, what a terrific narrative on the S2000, sport bike riding and more - appreciate it. I had heard the S2000 was high-revving/peaky, but you made me understand it in 3-D.

My wife's convertible is a comfortable & agile 2009 Mercedes CLK350 with only about 48k on it. For a convertible the noise level seems pretty mild, though I haven't put a decibel meter to it. Fun to drive, but nice that we don't need to.
 

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Sometimes, I enjoy spinning my ND2 Miata's engine to 7,500 RPM (it feels like it would keep pulling even after that), but I'm thankful it also has enough torque to not feel lethargic off the line. I've never had the opportunity to drive an S2000, but I know engine enough about it to predict that I probably wouldn't enjoy it unless I was driving at relatively constant speeds where I could keep the engine between VTEC and redline. I'd never owned a convertible before the Miata and I'm actually impressed with how quiet and non-turbulent the tiny cabin is. I'm cold-blooded, so any temperature between 75 and 105 is perfect convertible weather for me.

Regarding AWD, I used to enjoy doing one-wheel-peels when I was younger, but these days I'd rather feel my back against the seat and get where I'm going without ruining a tire and causing a scene. :)
 

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I ride sportbikes, have for a little over 20 years. The f20c motor in the S2000 was always something that enthusiasts ooooh'd and awww'd about. I never thought it was anything special. It's gutless until VTEC, and like most Honda N/A inline 4's, just no torque. As a motorcyclist, primarily literbikes, it was just a big displacement bike motor, or I should say similar to a 600cc sportbike with nothing in it until high in the revs but a much lower redline. I live in TX so the drop top, as I discovered, could rarely be used. It's either too damn hot and humid, or too cold. If I was lucky I'd get 1-2 weeks in the fall, and 1-2 weeks in the spring, where I could drop the top and enjoy it. Top up or down, it's loud as hell inside. The car taught me that convertibles are not for me. I briefly thought about buying the factory hard top. Went for a ride in a s2000 forum member's that had the hard top, and it was still too damn loud. And removing that f'er by myself, was too much effort for me. Now the handling was excellent, it's a true driver's car, but it suffers from snap oversteer. Push it too hard, the car won't let you know as the limit approaches, or not enough for me. It was a real wakeup call pushing the car on track, and the next thing you know I"m doing 360's and luckily just hit the dirt/kitty litter and had a hell of a wash and clean afterwards. The brakes in combination with the chassis was one of the best I've owned. And what I mean by that, is you could wait literally to the last second to make a turn, jam on the brakes hard, then make the right or the turn on the track. Certain things it was very good at. But overall I preferred the NSX even the 5spd version I owned briefly. The NSX with that beautiful V6 wailing behind your ears, I just loved the NSX much more. But I bought it for an investment and flipped it and didn't own it long. I regret that. That same car I owned 16 years ago is worth much more than I paid for it. Now the S2000's are creeping up price now as well. My S2000 would be worth more than I paid for it new today.

But I don't regret selling either. I have my sportbikes for outright performance in fair weather. There is no way on this Earth, on a nice day, that I'd grab the keys to a sports or performance car over one of my motorcycles. Nothing on this planet is as fun to me or more rewarding than being suited up, braking for a corner, leaning the bike way over, hitting the apex, then leaning it back up enough to have that credit card sized contact patch on the rear tire and going WFO out of corner. It's like being shot out of a rifle. Better than sex to me. My own personal roller coaster. No traction control. no riding nannies, and I have to use all 4 limbs to do it. Takes utter concentration, training, and tons of experience to be able to do it every weekend like I do.

Sports or performance cars, I just prefer AWD, in fact for any car/truck I prefer AWD. In a car, like say my FoRS, well I tracked that car in Utah while snow was falling and I was on MPSS. I love the inclement weather driving capability of a performance AWD car, especially the rain. I've driven 100's of days in my STI and FoRS where it's literally the fastest and safest thing on the road. I'm looking forward to the new STI that will debut next year and I'm hoping Honda will make the CTR with their excellent SH-AWD setup. My dream car was just made by Toyota/Gazoo, the Yaris GR-4 with front and rear diffs. Small, light weight, driving modes, diffs, but Toyo USA said no to bringing it here. So I wait for my next performance car which will likely be my last as I don't think they will made much longer, well anything under 50k.
I am an avid motorcyclist as well. Did the sport bike thing for several years until I realized that I preferred a bike that was less frenetic to ride on the street. Now, track was a different story...loved my little 600 when I could wring its neck...but my big liter V twin is might night on the road.

S2000:
402429


Ridgeline:
402430
 

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So far, I've owned 30 vehicles in 30 years. The one I regret most was a new 2019 Acura RDX I bought a couple of years ago. It was a lemon and I missed the 2017 Ridgeline I traded for it. A few months later, it cost me another $5,000 to trade back for another new 2019 Ridgeline exactly like the 2017 I had. Now, it's a lemon. I plan to dump it in the next 18,000 miles before the warranty is up and leave the Honda brand because of their products and attitude. The Honda of today is not the same Honda I fell in love with. That's a shame because the Ridgeline is an extremely useful vehicle and whatever I buy next will likely require more sacrifices, but I can't keep rewarding a company who demonstrates zero desire to retain my business.
Sadly I had the same experience with my 2019 RTL-T. I thought I had done my research and ended up with various problems and poor build quality. Lost about $5000.00 on trade for new Cadillac. 19,000 miles on Cadillac so far and no problems. Very happy with my new ride!
 

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Sadly I had the same experience with my 2019 RTL-T. I thought I had done my research and ended up with various problems and poor build quality. Lost about $5000.00 on trade for new Cadillac. 19,000 miles on Cadillac so far and no problems. Very happy with my new ride!
Most of the ten GM vehicles my parents have owned over the last 25 years have been either reasonably or completely reliable. The only standouts I can think of are a 2009 Traverse V5 that had a leaking water pump early in its life and a misrouted wire under the front passenger's seat that caused all kinds of mysterious electrical problems until it was finally discovered. The other is a 2006 Silverado that has needed front wheel bearings, drinks coolant and oil without other symptoms, and the transmission gets confused sometimes, but it's been doing those things for the last 50K of its 150K miles. I lost interest in GM after Oldsmobile shut down, Buick distilled their lineup, and Cadillac starting putting four-cylinder engines in full-size luxury cars.
 

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The most likely candidate at the present moment is a Mazda CX-5 Signature.
My wife and I rented a Mazda CX-5 for 3 1/2 weeks on vacation about 5 years ago. We liked it a lot, and I know Mazda has improved it significantly since then. Thinking about getting one, but might want something large for longer road trips if we don't want to drive the RL. For reliability I go more with Consumer Reports and their many thousands of customer reviews (more likely to get responses from owners regardless of their experiences than other places where disgruntled customers are more likely provide input). CR rates Mazda highly for reliability, and I know Mazda engineers its vehicles well in a lot of ways. Too bad the CX-9 is less sporty than its competition. But since personal experience can color perceptions too, we've been very happy with my wife's 2014 Mazda3 that we've had for over 6 years without a single problem, unless we count the time the navigation system went bonkers but then reset itself on the next start-up and has continued to work fine.

On another note, I don't see how you have time to change vehicles so often. I spend a lot of time researching and thinking, but even once I know what I want and have a price I have to suffer through about 2 1/2 to 3 hours of torture in California to complete the purchase. I can't go through that every year. And I don't like learning all the ins & outs of a new vehicle that often--there are still plenty of things I don't know how to work on my 2018 RL.
 

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Haha! I guess I've done it so many times that it's hardly more stressful than selecting a cut of meat at the butcher :) After I agree on a deal through email, the dealer experience is usually fine. The sale has already been made, so there's no potentially-emotional negotiating left.

Unlike Hondas until recently, Mazda's infotainment systems can be updated by owners via USB. They update their outdated infotainment systems more often than Honda does and I remember one of the updates addressing a spontaneous reboot issue.
 
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