Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had to replace the LR caliper because the inside pad jammed and would not wear, and the outside pad went to the backing plate. Of course, it didn't have the warning strip on it, so I had to get new rotors too.

Ran to the AZ and got all new parts, and brought the old caliper core with me to get the core credit. The AZ is 10 miles one way, so I plugged the line with plumber's putty, and wrapped that in a latex glove.

When I got back all the new parts went on fine, so then I started bleeding. Since the LR was what I just replaced, I started with it. I used the vacuum Harbor Freight bleeder, the one you connect to a compressor. I could not get a steady stream of fluid without bubbles, after 10 attempts. Then I thought I'd go with the recommended order of bleeding, LF, RF, RR, and LR. With every wheel I never got fluid without bubbles.

Put it all back together and now there is no pedal at all- it goes straight to the floor.

Any ideas on what I did wrong? Can I still fix this?

Help!
Bluemill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,620 Posts
I had to replace the LR caliper because the inside pad jammed and would not wear, and the outside pad went to the backing plate. Of course, it didn't have the warning strip on it, so I had to get new rotors too.

Ran to the AZ and got all new parts, and brought the old caliper core with me to get the core credit. The AZ is 10 miles one way, so I plugged the line with plumber's putty, and wrapped that in a latex glove.

When I got back all the new parts went on fine, so then I started bleeding. Since the LR was what I just replaced, I started with it. I used the vacuum Harbor Freight bleeder, the one you connect to a compressor. I could not get a steady stream of fluid without bubbles, after 10 attempts. Then I thought I'd go with the recommended order of bleeding, LF, RF, RR, and LR. With every wheel I never got fluid without bubbles.

Put it all back together and now there is no pedal at all- it goes straight to the floor.

Any ideas on what I did wrong? Can I still fix this?

Help!
Bluemill
How experienced are you bleeding brakes? Just asking because it sounds an awful lot like you are introducing new air into your lines while you are attempting to bleed.
It would be too coincidental that you got a bad master cylinder just at the time you are replacing one of your calipers. Check all of your lines to verify they are tight (so no air can get in), then be sure you never let the master cylinder reservoir get to the bottom (empty) when you are bleeding. It's gotta' be air in lines.

BTW, I also wouldn't be putting plumber's putty on the end of your lines.... too much of a chance for contamination (a small chunk falling in).
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,577 Posts
Agree with Ridged. I've had the exact same issues with bubbles using any type of vacuum bleeding process. I've been told that if you wrap the bleeder screw threads with about 3 turns of teflon tape, it will help eliminate the bubbles. I haven't had to bleed the brakes using that procedure yet, so I haven't verified that plumbers tape eliminates the bubbles.

Assuming you kept fluid in the reservoir when you bled the system, and assuming you probably replaced pads on more than the LR, it may take multiple pedal presses to move the pads enough to contact the rotor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,074 Posts
Quick question:
Other than while bleeding, did you pump the pedal to the floor a couple-few times? You have to do that every time you replace pads, in order to push the new pads out to seat against the rotor. Any chance this is the issue?
 
  • Like
Reactions: ridged

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I did not hit the pedal prior to bleeding. Today I had my son do the two man brake bleed, and I got good, no bubble fluid, all four wheels.
But the pedal goes to the floor, with very little resistance. Tried finding a bleed valve on the ABS control valve and module, but found nothing.

I had to move the truck out of the garage, and I thought if I creeped out I could control the stop with the parking brake. Dropping it into R the truck flew out of the garage without any gas.... was barely able to stop it with the parking brake. Way too exciting! No amount of pumping worked.

We are going to have to tow it to my neighborhood guy to see if he can figure it out.

I think I ran out of fluid while doing the vacuum bleed. The problem was that the reservoir is partially under the lip of the cowl, and you cant properly mount the new supply bottle on top of the master cylinder. I mounted the supply bottle at a 30 degree angle. I vacuumed about a quart of fluid through trying to get rid of bubbles.

I think the ABS control module is full of air now.

Help!

Bluemill
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,577 Posts
Yep, if you ran the reservoir dry, you have introduced air into the system. I don't know how to fix that if normal bleeding won't cure it. I've never had a problem keeping fluid in the reservoir while bleeding the system. I check it after bleeding each wheel and add fluid as necessary.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Carsmak

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
I don't know if our trucks are like this but some vehicles require a dealer level scan tool to actuate/bleed the ABS.
 

·
Registered
2007 Nimbus Grey Metallic RTL
Joined
·
10,046 Posts
If you sucked a quart of fluid through the system to bleed, you've certainly introduce air into the system for sure. While simply bleeding the brakes after a pad replacement, I've only ever had to bleed a few ounces at best through to get rid of the bubbles. I don't trust the suction bleeder systems. I'd much rather have my wife's right foot. She's gotten very good at being the Bleed Queen.

Echoing Dnick's comments - don't use putty on the banjo valves. Those orifices are very small and prone to contamination. Brake fluid will break down plumber's putty quickly and cause a nasty gunk. The preferred method is to use a piece of rubber hose that fits snugly into the banjo valve to stop to flow. You can also gently crimp the rubber line, but I don't recommend doing this for fear of damaging the brake line.

I hope you get the issue figured out quickly and easily. Just an unfortunate circumstance.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top