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I know that Honda has a hybrid Ridgeline somewhere in its pipeline (see announcement from Hachigo below). I am ready to plunck down $50k or so for this technology. Trouble is, no one can seem to tell me when it will happen. You would think that if Honda's President announced to the US market that it would be sold among the 2018 models, SOMEONE would know. I even queried the Chair of the US Honda dealers association, Nada, nothing. What is going on? Anyone listening out there know about this??? Maybe Tesla's announced pickup will stir the pot.

From 1/17 announcement on Hybrid Cars Website (also verified on numerous other websites)::

"Honda revealed on January 9, 2017 at the Detroit auto show that it is adding a dedicated hybrid model to its light truck lineup in 2018. The announcement was made during the introduction of Honda’s all-new Odyssey minivan by Takahiro Hachigo, the automaker’s president and CEO. The new hybrid model will be manufactured at a plant in the U.S. as part of the Honda Electrification Initiative, which calls for the expansion of the company’s electrified vehicles. “Half of the all-new models Honda will launch in the United States in the coming two years will be electrified vehicles,” Hachigo said."
 

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If you look at Honda sales figures, Odyssey, HRV, CRV, Pilot and Ridgeline are considered apart of the Light Truck lineup. From articles that I have read, the Odyssey is most likely to be Hybrid, although HRV & CRV would be the next obvious targets. None of them have high tow ratings and most Hybrids have low to no towing capabilities.

Honda is also rumored to be developing a New Passport, which will slot between the CRV & Pilot
 

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While Honda has a long history of electric vehicles, they never seem to come into the mainstream with consumers. Honda is lagging and needs to catch up with Toyota and Nissan. I would see Honda adopting something like "start/stop" technology first before moving to a hybrid in the Ridgeline.

I'd be interested in one, but not at $50k, and I think Honda knows they need to make it affordable.
 
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If you look at Honda sales figures, Odyssey, HRV, CRV, Pilot and Ridgeline are considered apart of the Light Truck lineup. From articles that I have read, the Odyssey is most likely to be Hybrid, although HRV & CRV would be the next obvious targets. None of them have high tow ratings and most Hybrids have low to no towing capabilities...
The Ody seems like a logical choice for the hybrid option, but supposedly a hybrid Pilot mule has recently been spotted. Developing a hybrid Pilot using the 3.5l V6 to help maintain respectable towing capability could serve dual purposes. It allows Honda to challenge the Highlander Hybrid which can tow 3,500 lbs (gas-only Highlanders can tow up to 5,000 lbs), and by migrating the hybrid engine into the RL, Honda could get bragging rights for most fuel-efficient mid-size pickup.

I didn't confirm it but I think the CVT-equipped HR-V and CR-V already claim class-leading mpgs, so maybe those models are slated for hybrid engines at a later date?
 

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While Ridgelines get halfway decent highway mileage, they get poor stop and go city mileage. A hybrid drivetrain has the potential to greatly improve real city mileage.
 

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You're not going to get much milage with a V6 3.5L Hybrid. Look to the facts what are out there...The acura, infinity, lexus, porsche are all sports or compact cars, not tow'rs. Its a bust
Valid points, but Highlander Hybrid AWD 3.5 V6 is rated 29/27 city/hwy mpg in 3,500 lb. towing class while RL is rated 18/25 city/hwy in 5,000 lb. towing class. That's a big mpg gain in city driving for a 1,500 lb. towing sacrifice (although real world driving reports suggest the actual difference is less). Still, it seems like a hybrid RL could fill a sweet spot for buyers who don't need more than 3,500 lb. of towing capability. But would a hybrid V6 be a marketing success? Possibly for the Pilot but sketchy for the RL.
 

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If you believe 29/27 city/hwy mpg is such a dramatic gain, then I pity. Need much higher numbers. My guess is it will be an upgrade to the CRV. which is lighter and has 1500 towing. Bring up those number into the 30-40 mpg range
And at 1500# towing will any owners miss it being 0, doubtful.

CRV would be my target, it also already has high sales numbers, and that would probably make it a sales leader for the segment which has the highest growth potential for the next 3-5 years.
 

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Is the CRV part of Honda's "truck" platform?

I kind of thought that was the platform used in the Pilot, Odyssey and Ridgeline.
 

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Is the CRV part of Honda's "truck" platform?

I kind of thought that was the platform used in the Pilot, Odyssey and Ridgeline.
It is apart of the sales numbers.
 

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Is the CRV part of Honda's "truck" platform?

I kind of thought that was the platform used in the Pilot, Odyssey and Ridgeline.
It is apart of the sales numbers.
Yes. Honda even considers the HR-V and late Crosstour to be "trucks" for accounting purposes. "Cars" are the Fit, Civic, Accord, Clarity, and Insight.
 

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While Ridgelines get halfway decent highway mileage, they get poor stop and go city mileage. A hybrid drivetrain has the potential to greatly improve real city mileage.
Seriously? IMHO half way decent mileage is a reach. For Honda efficiency the Ridgeline is not in the ballpark with other trucks. I've never gotten over 20mpg on my 07 RL.
 

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Seriously? IMHO half way decent mileage is a reach. For Honda efficiency the Ridgeline is not in the ballpark with other trucks. I've never gotten over 20mpg on my 07 RL.
Well that’s why you need a G2...

But seriously, our G1 was designed 14+ years ago, and few if any Crew Cab Trucks got 20mpg
 
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Seriously? IMHO half way decent mileage is a reach. For Honda efficiency the Ridgeline is not in the ballpark with other trucks. I've never gotten over 20mpg on my 07 RL.
My 14 gets an honest (calculated) 24mpg when driven at 60-65mph on more or less level highway with low traffic conditions. This with 10% ethanol 87 octane gas

On mellow country roads with no traffic and going around 50mph that number is more like 26.

I would expect the GenII to do about 3 mpg better (hand calculated; not trusting the over optimistic trip computer)

Neither of those come close to what a Accord etc might get but those vehicles don't have the inherent lack of aerodynamics or 4500lb curb weight. Other gasoline powerd midsized / full sized trucks won't be doing much if any better

I use my Ridgeline for work (hauling tools and materials; never towing) and I sit in stop and go city traffic on a daily basis. My 14 gets around 14mpg in those conditions. A well executed hybrid with regenerative braking and start top technologies could easily add 10mpg to hose those in town numbers.

Is that enough to warrant the cost and complexity of a Hyrbrid? I don't know but I hope they build it so I can decided first hand for myself.
 

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I would see Honda adopting something like "start/stop" technology first before moving to a hybrid in the Ridgeline.
Ugh, no thanks. My BMW has this. It was the first thing I turned off. Constantly starting and stopping the engine was beyond annoying. It hurts off the line performance if you need to pull out quickly from a stop sign or similar. Also, it doesn't really work all that well in the south during the summer months; the AC load is too much and causes the engine to kick back on shortly after stopping.
 

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Does all that stop/start drain the battery life?
Not sure, BMWs run off the battery most of the time anyway. They've got a clutch in the alternator and it only engages the alternator when the battery voltage drops below a certain level, or, if you're coasting to a stop. Pretty much all other times the car runs off the battery. This is easy to see with an ODB2 adapter (monitoring the batt. voltage) and something like the Android Torque app. I'm not sure if Honda does the same thing, I suspect not though, the Germans seem to like making everything more complicated than necessary.
 

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Does all that stop/start drain the battery life?
No. Manufacturers size the battery appropriately for the application. Generally, models with idle stop technology have larger capacity batteries than they would need otherwise.

Not sure, BMWs run off the battery most of the time anyway. They've got a clutch in the alternator and it only engages the alternator when the battery voltage drops below a certain level, or, if you're coasting to a stop. Pretty much all other times the car runs off the battery. This is easy to see with an ODB2 adapter (monitoring the batt. voltage) and something like the Android Torque app. I'm not sure if Honda does the same thing, I suspect not though, the Germans seem to like making everything more complicated than necessary.
The "clutch" to which you refer is not used to control the charging rate. Instead, it is used to improve NVH and component life. These devices have been around for over 15 years. Honda uses a similar device called an OAD (Overrunning Alternator Decoupler). Simply put, it's a one-way clutch that allows the alternator to overrun the engine when the engine slows down quickly. The alternator is never decoupled from being powered by the engine. Our Ridgelines have one.

The earliest alternators had only one charging mode that was not computer controlled. Next came computer-controlled charging that could stop charging under certain conditions. Then came dual-mode, computer-controlled charing that could output two different charging voltages. Honda's current system charges using a range of voltages in 0.1 volt increments.

In a vehicle without idle stop, the battery is used only to start the vehicle. The alternator normally powers the vehicle regardless of brand. In vehicles with idle stop, the battery powers the vehicle only when the engine stops.
 

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Also alternators today are "smart". They push out much more power when the battery is drained eg after a start and reduce output as battery refills. If you monitor voltage you'll gradually see voltage drop on long journeys from 14 down to 12, unless you are making heavy draws such as headlights heater fan stereo etc.
 

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I see Honda posted pricing and EPA numbers for the hybrid MDX. Essentially, you get an additional 31hp and 37% better MPG for a $1500 premium....not a bad ROI, I'd say.

26/27/27, city/highway/combined, 321hp

No mention of towing ability yet...
 

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Does the 3.0 in there use a timing belt as well or chain drive ? Thinking maybe they used it to reduce maint costs.

Steve
 
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