Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner
381 - 391 of 391 Posts

·
Super Moderator
2021 Radiant Red RTL
Joined
·
6,631 Posts
I would like to see some advancements in small diesel engines, I think compact trucks could really benefit from a lot of torque and a small engine
With the increased torque produced by the electric vehicle platform, that certainly reduces the attractiveness of the diesel engine in the average size vehicle.
 

·
Registered
2006 Ridgeline RT
Joined
·
261 Posts
With the increased torque produced by the electric vehicle platform, that certainly reduces the attractiveness of the diesel engine in the average size vehicle.
I may have to concede my point here, I honestly cant think of any benefits a diesel engine would have over traditional gas and electric for a daily driver.
 

·
Premium Member
2019 RTL awd, MSM
Joined
·
5,185 Posts
I may have to concede my point here, I honestly cant think of any benefits a diesel engine would have over traditional gas and electric for a daily driver.
The only advantage I can think of for diesel is heavy-duty towing applications where battery electric tech still, as far as we know, has quite a steep curve ahead to achieve the needed energy density / range for expected ROI*.

Honda is not in the heavy-duty towing arena, and I believe their primary diesel market is Europe, where the diesel is quickly being replaced by electric for those light applications.

* The same holds true for boating applications, except ICE is king for light applications in that venue. Diesels are typically too heavy for small light boats, as would be current battery electric technology. Engines in boating applications are typically under high loads much more so than in, say, an automobile. An engine driving a boat would have more in common with an HD truck towing a heavy load, or a car racing up Pike's Peak at 5000rpm. As boat size grows, power generally turns to diesel. I have a difficult time imagining an efficient BEB (Battery Electric Boat).
 

·
Registered
2006 Ridgeline RT
Joined
·
261 Posts
The only advantage I can think of for diesel is heavy-duty towing applications where battery electric tech still, as far as we know, has quite a steep curve ahead to achieve the needed energy density / range for expected ROI*.

Honda is not in the heavy-duty towing arena, and I believe their primary diesel market is Europe, where the diesel is quickly being replaced by electric for those light applications.

* The same holds true for boating applications, except ICE is king for light applications in that venue. Diesels are typically too heavy for small light boats, as would be current battery electric technology. Engines in boating applications are typically under high loads much more so than in, say, an automobile. An engine driving a boat would have more in common with an HD truck towing a heavy load, or a car racing up Pike's Peak at 5000rpm. As boat size grows, power generally turns to diesel. I have a difficult time imagining an efficient BEB (Battery Electric Boat).
I see your point and raise you a YouTube DIYer who also built his own airplane

 

·
Premium Member
2019 RTL awd, MSM
Joined
·
5,185 Posts
I see your point and raise you a YouTube DIYer who also built his own airplane

To be sure, there are many different types of boats, just as with cars. Small light boats can move about relatively efficiently* at slow speeds with those electric trolling motors. Planing speed is a whole 'nother matter, however. It's a bit like an electric scooter vs a Chevy Bolt, particularly with relative efficiency suited to the task at hand.

* he is operating the boat at essentially displacement speeds, or rather, speeds below which the boat would overcome the bow wake. While reasonable for getting from point A to point B at a leisurely pace, it would be akin to riding your bicycle ten miles across town to pick up some groceries vs taking your Ridgeline and doing it in one-fourth the time. Sometimes speed is much more convenient and often necessary. 😁

Although he is traveling at displacement speeds, his boat is not the most efficient design for doing so. It should be narrowed at the aft end as well as the bow. Think canoe, or container ship. A flat stern is ideal for planing speeds, whereas a narrow stern is ideal for displacement speeds. Also, if he tripled the length of his vessel for its given width, he would likely pick up a couple knots speed with negligible reduction in battery life, even with the extra weight. Cargo canoes used in Canada and Alaska are famous for being used to move lots of weight with relatively little energy by taking advantage of this phenomenon. ;)
 

·
Super Moderator
2021 Radiant Red RTL
Joined
·
6,631 Posts
Some Hyundai dealers are requesting a non-refundable $2K deposit to hold a Santa Cruz and expecting a $6-8K premium over MSRP at sale. That tactic will certainly slow the sales of the Santa Cruz to a crawl. Everything is pure speculation at this point, since none of them have hit the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
Some Hyundai dealers are requesting a non-refundable $2K deposit to hold a Santa Cruz and expecting a $6-8K premium over MSRP at sale. That tactic will certainly slow the sales of the Santa Cruz to a crawl. Everything is pure speculation at this point, since none of them have hit the ground.
As P.T. Barnum is rumored to have said, "There's a sucker born every minute".

More power to the dealers who make a tidy profit off the early adopters and those who can't wait. If the market demand justifies the price, then so be it.

We'll probably see something posted here in 2 or 3 years talking about what great deals there are on all the Santa Fe models languishing on lots. LOL! :)
 

·
Registered
2006 Ridgeline RT
Joined
·
261 Posts
As P.T. Barnum is rumored to have said, "There's a sucker born every minute".

More power to the dealers who make a tidy profit off the early adopters and those who can't wait. If the market demand justifies the price, then so be it.

We'll probably see something posted here in 2 or 3 years talking about what great deals there are on all the Santa Fe models languishing on lots. LOL! :)
That's exactly what I'm hoping for LOL, I'm hoping in 3-5 years when I'm ready to upgrade I'll be looking at well priced 2021 RLs and SCs 😊
 

·
Registered
2021 Ridgeline Sport
Joined
·
473 Posts
It's not because no one wanted the diesel...it's because of the stupidly expensive upcharge for a diesel on top of the more expensive fuel and the DEF.

I loved every diesel I ever owned and would always drive one if I had a choice (except in a sports car of course). The torque is so nice. Low revving. Great fuel economy. I also enjoyed using the local biodiesel co-op to buy cheap fuel made from used cooking oil. I'm not a tree hugger, but hey...if I can buy better fuel, cheaper, and help the environment...then that's a win/win.
Partly true, Nissan had to replace a bunch of the XD Cummins diesels, turbos going out, bad injectors, some just plain blew up! they also had, and still have some problems with the gas engines, block replacement isn't uncommon. I saw a XD diesel just about every time I had my Titan serviced being torn down. that's why I drive a Honda now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
Partly true, Nissan had to replace a bunch of the XD Cummins diesels, turbos going out, bad injectors, some just plain blew up! they also had, and still have some problems with the gas engines, block replacement isn't uncommon. I saw a XD diesel just about every time I had my Titan serviced being torn down. that's why I drive a Honda now!
Well, that is just poor quality or poor design. Diesel engines still make great sense for many applications. I've owned two diesel SUVs and one diesel car. I loved them all. The torque is addictive. I remember towing a trailer up a steep grade in my Jeep Grand Cherokee diesel and it never downshifted. RPMs never dropped. I never pushed the pedal any harder. It just tractored up the mountain like it wasn't there. A gas engine of the same displacement would have been screaming at 5000 rpm. Diesel fuel is a byproduct of producing other oil distillates, so it should be cheap...but it's not. Diesel engines aren't really that much more complicated than gas ones, yet manufacturers charge thousands if you want the diesel option.
 

·
Registered
2021 Ridgeline Sport
Joined
·
473 Posts
I believe you! My dad is a big powerstroke fan, I do have a diesel tractor. I copied just one of the posts from the Titan XD forums:


Driving down the highway today about 60 mph and all of a sudden engine started knocking hard and I mean hard. Pull over and driving about 30 mph in neutral and it’s quite. Put it back in drive and go just a few seconds at 30. It’s shaking like a sick hooker in church and then it died.
2 hrs to get on the hook & to the dealer. They said they’d update me tomorrow. 36,000 miles since purchase Aug 2018. Has been a really good truck up to this point. Anyone else have issues with this 5.0 Cummins?
I’m told it’s a broken crank shaft & they are in the process of getting a new long block now. All covered under warranty. Maybe this will work out ok? We shall see. Anyone else heard of crankshaft failure in the 5.0 Cummins?
 
381 - 391 of 391 Posts
Top