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In our continued efforts to bring more worthwhile content to the ROC, tonight I posted a Honda document that explains the Ridgeline's VTM-4 system in great detail. Thanks to Gary Flint for providing this information to us.

Click here to read the entire document.

Come back to this thread to discuss...

Edit: see post #150 in this thread to a link to pdf files of the article. The link above is broken.
 

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In our continued efforts to bring more worthwhile content to the ROC, tonight I posted a Honda document that explains the Ridgeline's VTM-4 system in great detail. Thanks to Gary Flint for providing this information to us.

Click here to read the entire document.

Come back to this thread to discuss...
Thanks for posting this!
 

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Thanks, Gary and T Mac. A very thorough explanation.
 

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I guess my brain is still stuck in "1964 Jeep Wagoneer mode" because all this automatic four wheel drive talk just makes me all confused. So the article by Mr. Flint was very useful to me. He went to the trouble of explaining the automatic all wheel drive in a way that I can visualize.

It's neat that the drive train even works in just routine driving to ensure better control and safety.

My biggest "snow moment" with my Ridgeline came in Dec of last year when we got 14 inches here.

14 inches of wet snow is about the limit for the Ridgeline, more than that, and it will high center in the snow and lose grip.

Lots of that Big Three SUV iron was trapped just a few feet out of their garages and in the snow in the driveway. Me...I just smiled and drove around them, using some of those switches and low gears on the Ridgeline, but not really understanding what I was doing. Next big snow, I'll know a bit more thanks to the article.
 

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Enjoyed the article. Thanks for posting.
 

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Interesting, the ball cam assembly is eerily similar to the clutch on my old Harley. Simple technology sometimes works best.
 

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I really appreciate the information. I've been impressed with this truck since the first time I saw one on the Auto Show floor back in January '06, and it's the neat stuff like this that keeps my interest up.

This system has been very effective for me personally. At the end of the road that we live on, there is a major intersection that is heavily travelled. Pavement conditions are bumpy from the weight of trucks, and any light mist tends to make the surface very slick.

With my Durango, I learned early on to stick it in 4-Hi if I had my wife in the truck, as she would always freak out if I gave it any gas at all when making a right turn to go south, as the rear would break loose. In the Ridge, I've stood on the pedal and it just doesn't slip. At all.

Gary, I'm only going to complain about one thing: This thing is so effective that I have YET to even be able to satisfy that one primal urge in the American male: How do I spin the tires?
 

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Alright, I'll be the Debby Downer here... While there is no doubting the capabilities of this system, the first thing that comes to mind is, how difficult and expensive is this system going to be if we start having problems? Not saying we will but in 7-10 years when we starting having "elderly" Ridgelines out there, is this high tech system going to be a real choker when we see the repair bill?

Just drawing up discussion here. I don't suspect I'll have problems as I drive my truck as if it is made of Balsa Wood... Very rarely work it hard. I guess it should't be a concern now. Now my biggest concern is when is the next Meet and what wax to use...:D

Fantastic info.... Thanks Gary and T-Mac. :)
 

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Nice article. I knew I had a great truck.
 

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Thanks to Gary Flint and T MAC. Great article. Love this truck more every day!
 

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Very informative reading. A good reference to remember all the applications, depending on the circumstances and season. Accelerating out of the apex of the curve and quick starts at the light in the rain. This is where the truck really separates itself from all the others.
 

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thanks Gary & Tom for sharing this, really makes it understandable for those of us whose automotive "engineering" is limited to installing bolt-on mods!
 

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I never realized the system engaged when accelerating from a stop... Great info, thanks for sharing!
 

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And I thought I was good driver... especially in the snow....:rolleyes: ... I always knew most of my skills was really the RL... and it is one of the many things I enjoy about owning a RL...
 

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Great article, keep the educational stuff coming!

Thankyou TMac and Gary!!!!!:) :) :)
 

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The explaination did not help. It was graphs without units, something my 4th grade math teacher would not allow.


In particular I would like to know at what speeds torque to the rear wheels diminishes and what is the max torque to the rear wheels in "auto" mode. When I accelerate hard on a freeway onramp the front end gets very light indicating that the front wheels are carrying most of not all of the engine torque.

I also don't buy the bit that Honda looked long and hard at every 4wd system and finally decided that the one already in their parts bin was the best. I figure that they looked long and hard and figured the Honda system was good, not great but was already designed, light weight and used fewer parts.

For on road driving a computer controlled separate center clutch would allow the same predictive torque transfer of the Honda system yet allow a more even torque split verses the Ridgeline's FWD system with rear torque only at low speeds. Some issues with the Honda system are high speed cornering, high speed acceleration. Porsche and Subaru are two examples of a computer controlled center clutch pack that is separate from the rear diff and allow a more balanced torque split and better driving feel.

For off road driving it's not an issue since the lack of skid plates and the low ground clearance limit the RL before limits of the 4WD system are reached.

There are trade offs to combining an active center clutch with a rear differential.

-W
 

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Thank you for the post. That's why the Ridgeline is the shi_!
 

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Wow.

Thanks to TMac and Gary for bringing this to the ROC...
... and thanks to ChrisM for bringing it to my(our) attention! (If not for his "Attention to those who haven't driven a RL in Snow" thread, I may have missed this very informative contribution.)

I had some idea of how the VTM-4/VSA worked, but I didn't realize just how hi-tech it really is! :eek: :cool:

A great read, and, as Bacpacr mentioned, a very informative reference to help sort-out what is happening when... during various traction, grade, and cornering circumstances.

One thing I still need help in understanding, however...

How does reducing the drive train to FWD help in deceleration?
It would seem to me, that using all four drive-wheels' resistance would be more effective at slowing a vehicle. Are the rear wheels then turning freely?
Or am I completely misunderstanding the following excerpt...
Automatic Mode
The VTM-4® electronic control unit, or ECU, constantly monitors vehicle speed and road conditions. When cruising or braking, the Ridgeline operates in front-wheel-drive only for maximum fuel efficiency.
I can't wait to get back into the RL and "experience, first hand" what Gary wrote was going on between the ECU, VSA, VTM-4, etc... :cool:
 
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