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Discussion Starter #1
At what RPM does the VTEC system "activate"

In other words, at what RPM does the engine switch to the high-lift cam mode.

I remember in my 1999 Acura Integra GSR, the VTEC didn't activate until something like 5,000 or 6,000RPM at full throttle.

I'm starting to get a feel that the VTEC on the Ridgeline probably kicks in somewhere in the 3,000-4,000RPM at full throttle during acceleration.

Anyone have facts on this?
 

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At what RPM does the VTEC system "activate"

In other words, at what RPM does the engine switch to the high-lift cam mode.

I remember in my 1999 Acura Integra GSR, the VTEC didn't activate until something like 5,000 or 6,000RPM at full throttle.

I'm starting to get a feel that the VTEC on the Ridgeline probably kicks in somewhere in the 3,000-4,000RPM at full throttle during acceleration.

Anyone have facts on this?
Depending on the year Ridgeline and operating conditions VTEC activation can occur between 3800 - 4400 RPM. There is no set RPM and there are many variables such as engine load percentage and even brake bias calculations.
 

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If there is a variance it should be visible on your tach I would think.
 

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There are a lot of variables. If the ECU is in open or closed loop mode, percent load, density altitude, ignition advance, etc. It's not a fixed number, but will not occur later than 4400 RPM. According to the fuel map the earliest I see it could actuate the switch valve is 3800 RPM.

Remember there are no EPA regulations on WOT operation so under heavy load conditions there is nothing wrong with running a rich mixture for a short period of time. I've don't see a OBDII code when the switch valve actuates but when I've towed 6500 lbs. it switches very close to 3800 RPM.

This is all pretty much history anyway since the new system is completely different.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've been really tuning into the engine while I'm driving, and I've notice the activation is usually around 3800 rpm, but at higher speeds it's also activated a little over 4000 rpm.

It's much easier to hear and feel the added boost with my intake and exhaust installed. When the truck was stock, the VTEC activation was much harder to detect.
 

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Since seeing this thread, I've been paying very close attention to mine as well. Just this morning, it activated consistently at what appeared to be right at 4,400 RPM (just a "hair" below the 4,500 RPM mark) dozens of times on my commute to work while in D or D3. At varying speeds, grades, and throttle positions, it was very consistent at 4,400 RPM every time. To my surprise, however, it didn't appear to activate at any RPM while in 2 based on no perceptible change in sound or feel from 0 to just over 60.
 

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I don't stomp on mine enough to activate my VTEC very often, but when I do it is really apparent in my '08. And I drive 100 to 150 miles every day of the week. I really have never watched the tach to see where it activates, I can just hear and feel it.
 

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My place of employment is directly off of a 4-lane, divided highway with 60 MPH traffic. To avoid getting ran over, you need to get up to reasonably quickly using about half throttle since there is no entrance ramp. I often cringe when going from a cold engine to 4,500 RPM in less than 15 seconds. :) When the vehicle is cold, the transmission holds gears longer pushing me into VTEC territory every time. If it is warm, it shifts about 3,500 RPM under the same conditions an no VTEC.
 

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My place of employment is directly off of a 4-lane, divided highway with 60 MPH traffic. To avoid getting ran over, you need to get up to reasonably quickly using about half throttle since there is no entrance ramp. I often cringe when going from a cold engine to 4,500 RPM in less than 15 seconds. :) When the vehicle is cold, the transmission holds gears longer pushing me into VTEC territory every time. If it is warm, it shifts about 3,500 RPM under the same conditions an no VTEC.
Technically other parts of the drive train are also waking up on a cold morning and are not as well warmed up while the car sits in the garage while the engine idles.
Driving easy until the temp gauge at least registers is advisable. But on balance, 3500-4500 rpm may be 'kids play' to a cold Honda engine.
Probably a good endorsement for using 0-20 oil.
 
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