Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was skeptical of how my "new" RL would perform offroad, up a steep hill, loaded down with landscaping stone.
It's a 2006 RTS with 81,000 miles.

Twice, I loaded it down with about 850 pounds of stone and 2 grown adults - total weight: about 1,296 pounds per trip.

Grade: I estimate the total average slope around 25% (50 foot rise, 200 foot run), per GIS mapping. This calculates to approximately 14 degrees.
The hillside had growth over 5 feet tall but no major stumps, rocks, or boulder; just hard packed dirt.

Tires: Michelin XT road tires

Stock everything else.


I was very impressed to discover this puppy crawled straight up the hill, no slipping, no sliding, not even struggling - it was fantastic. I kinda wished I'd had a brush guard and extra splash shields underneath, but it was okay - no damage at all.

Yet another reason I love my new RL. :)
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,592 Posts
You know we needs pictures... or better yet... video of this alleged event. ;)
 

·
Super Moderator
2006 Ridgeline RTS in Steel Blue
Joined
·
7,265 Posts
I'd love to see pics or video of even the next event near these loads & limits. To shove in the face of the next fool who calls the G1 a minivan. 11 yrs +, I'm so over it...
 
  • Like
Reactions: Last Train

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Next time I will post pictures. Every two weeks I have carried 22 bags of feed in the ridgeline. Each bag weighs 25kg. In addition to the my weight, there is the additional weight of the tow hitch and balls and tonneau cover.

My rear tires are inflated to 44lbs when I am carrying the load.

Drives great with the weight. No complaints.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Uncle Festus

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You know we needs pictures... or better yet... video of this alleged event. ;)
I was trying to think of a way to video this event since I could find NOTHING on youtube for similar circumstances, but I was helping a buddy and didn't want to slow down the day - there was an important football game to watch later that afternoon, so time was short. :)
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,592 Posts
Next time I will post pictures. Every two weeks I have carried 22 bags of feed in the ridgeline. Each bag weighs 25kg. In addition to the my weight, there is the additional weight of the tow hitch and balls and tonneau cover.

My rear tires are inflated to 44lbs when I am carrying the load.

Drives great with the weight. No complaints.
I've carried similar weights with 25 bags of mulch. I never thought about bumping up the tire pressure. Is that needed or recommended for any particular reason?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
As far as tires go, (being a former tire changer tech) - extra load range tires are always recommended when hauling any material weight (stiffer sidewalls, etc...). Anytime I'd ever changed tires on a work truck, the tire pressures were significantly greater than typical standard load range tires.
All that to say: yes, I would put extra air in the tires but would first confirm the load range of the tire to make sure it can safely handle the added weight. I suspect the truck's own load capacity would keep tire issues from coming up, but I don't know for sure how it compares to typical light-duty load capacities; you'll want to check with the tire mfgr.
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,592 Posts
That's a good point. I would think the OEM tires would be at least equal to the task at the max weight. I've never read anything in the OM about increasing tire pressure for carrying heavy loads. But those who branch out from the OEM tires might have to consider the load range. Otoh, perhaps most tires can handle the max weight of the RL when loaded to the max (6050 lbs for the G1).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
As far as tires go, (being a former tire changer tech) - extra load range tires are always recommended when hauling any material weight (stiffer sidewalls, etc...). Anytime I'd ever changed tires on a work truck, the tire pressures were significantly greater than typical standard load range tires.
All that to say: yes, I would put extra air in the tires but would first confirm the load range of the tire to make sure it can safely handle the added weight. I suspect the truck's own load capacity would keep tire issues from coming up, but I don't know for sure how it compares to typical light-duty load capacities; you'll want to check with the tire mfgr.
That is correct. The tires I have a rated to a max of 44psi. The load rating is marked on the tire. Not sure if it is still done on new cars but older cars and trucks used to have a sticker on the door panel to indicate the higher pressure when carrying load.

The maximum weight on the Rear Axle (GAWR includes weight of vehicle and load) of my 08 is 3245lbs (that's 1622 lbs per side). That info is on the door sticker.

I have the moonroof model so my total weight carried that can be carried in the entire vehicle must not exceed 1480lbs.

The Curb weight of my truck is approx 4570 lbs. I dont have the figures handy buts lets say a 52/48% weight distribution. So on the rear axles you have 2194 lbs (vehicle weight) before load. Therefore you can carry an addition 1051lbs (3245-2194lbs, with the moon roof, (1100lbs without moonroof)) on the rear axles. This is where you get folks quoting the 1100lb limit in the rear. Which means the other 429 lbs (1480-1051lbs) that the truck can carry has to be up front (if you are loading the truck with rear weight), that is passengers sitting in the front seat. Don't place any more weight further back.

Now the tires i use are max load 2149 lbs per side at 44psi COLD. This is written on the sidewall of my tires (or look up the Load Index number 107). And well since I can only have a max weight of 1622lbs (3245/2) per side on the axle, I am well below the limit of the tires. So yes I dont have to go as high as 44 lbs because I am not carry 2149 lbs on each tire. Please note that you must know the type of tire you have on the vehicle. Some tires are NOT designed for load and increasing the pressure could cause a blowout.

Tire Rack gives an overview on this. If you are wearing tires that are cheap passenger tires you may not have the option of increasing the pressure OR you may not have that much room to increase the weight in the vehicle. So be careful what you buy. You do NOT want a tire with a Load rating below 98 !

The original 245/65/17 tire for the Ridgeline was a load index tire of 105. Thus max load on that tire was 2039lbs. A Load Index of 111 would be best and I am using a Load Index tire of 107.

So 19 bags of feed in the rear of the truck (stacked higher at the front of the bed), 3 bags of Feed in the passenger seat area, plus me. So I know I am close or at the limit. Bought for work, not fun.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Last Train

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,592 Posts
Interesting info.

FWIW, the 1100 lb load rating in the bed comes from the Honda OM:

For the G1 (I don't know about the G2 RL):
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Interesting info.

FWIW, the 1100 lb load rating in the bed comes from the Honda OM:

For the G1 (I don't know about the G2 RL):
That would account for the additional 50lbs for those who dont have the moon roof as the load limit is 1530 lbs for those without the moon roof and 1480 for those with the moonroof.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Here is another bit of info for about your tires.

If your temperature is below 70F, increase your tire pressure by 1psi for every 10 degress below 70.
that is, at 60F = 33psi, 50F=34psi, 40F=35psi (stop here if your tire is an Index 105), 30F=36psi, 20F=37psi, 10F=38psi, 0F & colder=39psi (stop here if your tire is an Index 107)

If I extrapolate (not scientific)
MY Load Index 107 tire that has a max load weight of 2149lbs at 44psi (check your sidewalls for info)
32psi for truck weight 1097lbs (rear axle unloaded)

Therefore at 1622 lbs (per side @ rear loaded), I should be adding approx 6 psi , for a total of 38psi. That actually sounds more in line with what it should be when carrying a full load based on my past experience with load stickers in the previous trucks I owned.

OK so I will go outside and deflate my tires to 38psi. :nerd: Remember I am using a higher Load index tire and the numbers are specific to my tire.

Now for those of you who are still wearing the standard 105 Load Index tire, The max inflation pressure of those tires is probably near 35psi (guessing as I dont have the original tire to look at) @ 2039lbs.

Extrapolating again, for that tire you would need to inflate by an additional 1.7psi when carrying full load. That would mean aprox 34psi. Now seeing that most people dont read their manuals or load stickers, it would explain why Honda didn't bother to put the information there. Your average joe/jane isnt going to care about 2psi in his tires and your average joe/jane isnt always carrying an additional 1100 lbs in the rear. And if you do care, then just pump it to 35psi when cold (if that is the max) and carry your load.
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,592 Posts
Here are the specs on the OEM LTX M/S tire for the G1 RL:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
As far as tires go, (being a former tire changer tech) - extra load range tires are always recommended when hauling any material weight (stiffer sidewalls, etc...). Anytime I'd ever changed tires on a work truck, the tire pressures were significantly greater than typical standard load range tires.
All that to say: yes, I would put extra air in the tires but would first confirm the load range of the tire to make sure it can safely handle the added weight. I suspect the truck's own load capacity would keep tire issues from coming up, but I don't know for sure how it compares to typical light-duty load capacities; you'll want to check with the tire mfgr.
Yes...TOTALLY...agree scubacamper...my good friend from Sunday School (that was the Viper and Cummins mechanic at the local Dodge dealer) used to talk about tires all the time. I used to always try to replace tires on any rig with "E" Load rated Michelins of some sort. But no such luck with the tire sized on the Gen 2 RL's.

So, my Michelin Defender LTX M/S are rated the same as the Firestone's I took off...oh well. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Here are the specs on the OEM LTX M/S tire for the G1 RL:

:smile: (for others - not all 105 are the same, for eg. The Yokohama Geolander A/T G015 is 2039lbs at 51psi, the Hankook Dynapro HT RH12 is 2039 lbs at 35psi)

So using that Load Index tires 2039lbs at 44psi (shown above). With a full load, extrapolating, that would need approx 7 psi @ 1622 lbs. So 39psi needed at 70F.

What brand tires was that OEM tire? At first I thought it was the Michelin LTX M/S P245/65R17 105T but that is rated at only 1854 lbs @ 44psi... except on Tireracks website it says 2039lbs. That tire is discontinued anyway, anyone with over 50000 miles still has that tire on their truck?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Next time I will post pictures. Every two weeks I have carried 22 bags of feed in the ridgeline. Each bag weighs 25kg. In addition to the my weight, there is the additional weight of the tow hitch and balls and tonneau cover.

My rear tires are inflated to 44lbs when I am carrying the load.

Drives great with the weight. No complaints.
as promised here are my photos.. Here I have 20 x 25kg bags in the rear (6 under the front part of the tonneau, 8 in the middle row, 6 at the tailgate) and another 2 x 25kg bags at the front seat. The bags in the front seat are in green bags to prevent dust from getting all over the interior.

total weight 1210 lbs + passenger (210 lbs) + hitch weight (35lbs) + tonneau weight (20lb) = 1475 lbs
Tire Pressure 38psi.




 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top