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Discussion Starter #1
I just finished installing the roof rack. It took about 2 hours. My hacksaw's blade is very dull...I would suggest buying a new blade for your saw before attempting the install. I did accomplish to make one mistake...whether or not it is a big one...only time will tell. I was using a torque wrench to finalize the install and I over torqued one of the screws connected to the roof. So out of 12 possible screws, only 11 are secure on the roof rack. Luckily it did not involve any of the corner screws(8) just one of the center(4) ones. I would rate the install as easy to moderate. Beware of over torquing the screws. Hope this helps. BTW, I checked for noise at 50 mph and bad. I will try the highway tomorrow...that is the true test.
 

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bongus said:
I just finished installing the roof rack. It took about 2 hours. My hacksaw's blade is very dull...I would suggest buying a new blade for your saw before attempting the install. I did accomplish to make one mistake...whether or not it is a big one...only time will tell. I was using a torque wrench to finalize the install and I over torqued one of the screws connected to the roof. So out of 12 possible screws, only 11 are secure on the roof rack. Luckily it did not involve any of the corner screws(8) just one of the center(4) ones. I would rate the install as easy to moderate. Beware of over torquing the screws. Hope this helps. BTW, I checked for noise at 50 mph and bad. I will try the highway tomorrow...that is the true test.
Ok, had to laugh a little bit at this as using the torque wrench is supposed to prevent stripping threads out, provided you have it dialed in to spec. But I'm not one to judge. My friends call me "OT" which is short for Over Torque as I think I've stripped every thread known to man kind, just not with a torque wrench :)

As for this situation, if just the screw is stripped, get a replacement. If the receiving end is stripped then there's a variety of solutions. A hardware store will have some sleves you can put in the hole so the screw will bite although it's typically for wood applications, not sure if it would work here. If it was me, I'd probably just mix up some epoxy and plop it in and then put the screw in best you can and call it good. Or you could also fill in the hole and drill and tap it out. Not sure epoxy would be the best for this, talk to an old fart at Ace Hardware, they always know their stuff, avoid the young guys :)
 

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.

What is the weight and size of space for the roof rack ?

How loud is the additional noise created by the air movement ?

With a lockable trunk that is easier to access , I think I could
do without the roof rack and use the dollars for other items .

.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
In regards to the roof rack noise, I did not seat one of the moulding properly and that resulted in the noise issue...now it's fixed and sound is minimal :) . Thanks Vertrkr for the chime in...I think I'm going to call it good; I just hope having the 11 secured screws will suffice versus having 12.

I believe the roof rack is designed to hold a max of 110lbs, obviously the weight has to be evenly distributed. One of the other reasons I went with the roof rack is I think it adds to the look of the truck besides adding function. In today's world many accessories are used primarily for looks versus function.
 

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Could you give us a little more 1, 2, 3 on how its done and how much of a job it is?

Also, you mentioned the saw blade - how much cutting and what kind of cutting do you have to do?

Did you really say it's only rated for 100 pounds and how do you know that? I would like to put one on when I get mine but was hoping to actually put a Thule on it and use it. Thanks
 

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If you are still concered about your one problem screw. You could try Loctite on it. Blue is medium strenght and Red is Max strength (If you ever want to take apart for some reason Red would make it very difficult) It's not cheap but a great product. Most Hardware stores or Auto Suppliers should have it.
http://www.loctite.com/int_henkel/loctite_us/index.cfm
bongus said:
I just finished installing the roof rack. It took about 2 hours. My hacksaw's blade is very dull...I would suggest buying a new blade for your saw before attempting the install. I did accomplish to make one mistake...whether or not it is a big one...only time will tell. I was using a torque wrench to finalize the install and I over torqued one of the screws connected to the roof. So out of 12 possible screws, only 11 are secure on the roof rack. Luckily it did not involve any of the corner screws(8) just one of the center(4) ones. I would rate the install as easy to moderate. Beware of over torquing the screws. Hope this helps. BTW, I checked for noise at 50 mph and bad. I will try the highway tomorrow...that is the true test.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ridgeman said:
Could you give us a little more 1, 2, 3 on how its done and how much of a job it is?

Also, you mentioned the saw blade - how much cutting and what kind of cutting do you have to do?

Did you really say it's only rated for 100 pounds and how do you know that? I would like to put one on when I get mine but was hoping to actually put a Thule on it and use it. Thanks
If you go to the HandA site, you can view the installation process for the roof rack. The documentation is great. I got the 100 lb. information from the actual rack...there are stickers on it with weight limitations. There are a total of 10 cuts that need to be made and they are straight cuts.
 

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I've used JB Weld epoxy in a stripped nut...mix the two parts, use a toothpick or similar and smear it heavily over the stripped area. Take some WD-40, or better yet, some TriFlow and lube the bolt. Screw in loosely (do NOT tighten yet!) and let the epoxy set for at least a few hours. Overnight is best (park in sun if possible to heat the area, which accelerates the curing). Then tighten...done!

Aloha,
Keoni
 

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If you download the instructions as suggested in an earlier post

http://www.handa-accessories.com/Ridgeline/roofrack.pdf

and follow them step by step, it's very easy. The first thing you want be careful with is prying up the trim on the roof. Just use some plastic item to do the prying. You only have to pry high enough to get your fingers on the end. Then just pull forward and the strip will slide forward and off. Then you use needlenose pliers to pull off the plastic clips.

When you are measuring the trim strip for cutting, make sure you do the measuring twice. Take your time. Get a brand new hacksaw blade. The rest is really easy. Just don't overtorque the nuts! I almost did the same thing. Luckily I noticed that I had the torque set incorrectly and backed off the nut without stripping the thread.

This truck is very very quiet, to any additional noise due to added equipment will be noticed. Those sloping rear pillars were added to reduce wind noise associated with pickups and they are very effective. With the roof rack at highway speeds, there is some noise but it's not excessive. Also, you can barely see a roof rail from inside the cab through the sun roof.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
sfoster said:
If you download the instructions as suggested in an earlier post

http://www.handa-accessories.com/Ridgeline/roofrack.pdf

and follow them step by step, it's very easy. The first thing you want be careful with is prying up the trim on the roof. Just use some plastic item to do the prying. You only have to pry high enough to get your fingers on the end. Then just pull forward and the strip will slide forward and off. Then you use needlenose pliers to pull off the plastic clips.

When you are measuring the trim strip for cutting, make sure you do the measuring twice. Take your time. Get a brand new hacksaw blade. The rest is really easy. Just don't overtorque the nuts! I almost did the same thing. Luckily I noticed that I had the torque set incorrectly and backed off the nut without stripping the thread.

This truck is very very quiet, to any additional noise due to added equipment will be noticed. Those sloping rear pillars were added to reduce wind noise associated with pickups and they are very effective. With the roof rack at highway speeds, there is some noise but it's not excessive. Also, you can barely see a roof rail from inside the cab through the sun roof.
You explained it better than I could and you are 100% correct.
 

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Roof Rack install.... wind noise?

Hi, folk,

I have always had a roof rack on all of my mini van and station wagons.
but I rarely ever use it. they all come factory installed and actually do not look good on mini-vans. in the case of the RL truck, with the huge bed available for loading, I definitely DO NOT need a roof rack for carrying stuff. BUT the truck looks much better with a roof rack.

My questions is: with the height of the truck and lack of aerodynamics, are you sure there is only slight wind noise with the roof rack installed? It comes down to, if there is any slight wind noise, I will not get it... Is there less wind noise with the cross bar removed?

Because after I install the roof rack, I can not uninstall it if there is wind noise. In my case, practicality before vanity.
 

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On my truck there is wind noise over 40mph. I don't know if it's from the windshield seal or the roof rack, but I suspect the latter. It doesn't bother me as it is not obtrusive. I can have a normal conversation over it and I don't have to crank the stereo to overcome it. To me, this is a truck, not a Mercedes ;)

Maybe I'll measure it with my sound level meter just for giggles.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Re: Roof Rack install.... wind noise?

Blue said:
Hi, folk,

I have always had a roof rack on all of my mini van and station wagons.
but I rarely ever use it. they all come factory installed and actually do not look good on mini-vans. in the case of the RL truck, with the huge bed available for loading, I definitely DO NOT need a roof rack for carrying stuff. BUT the truck looks much better with a roof rack.

My questions is: with the height of the truck and lack of aerodynamics, are you sure there is only slight wind noise with the roof rack installed? It comes down to, if there is any slight wind noise, I will not get it... Is there less wind noise with the cross bar removed?

Because after I install the roof rack, I can not uninstall it if there is wind noise. In my case, practicality before vanity.
Hello Blue, I was one that had the truck before the roof rack and after the install I did not notice any significant amount of noise during high speed travel. With my sunroof open, I did notice a bit more noise again not enough to annoy me. I had my wife verify the noise as well and she said it was not bothersome. So, I guess I would have to say it is a subjective thing...I did not measure the noise using a decible meter so I can't be objective like that. Hope this helps....BTW, I too think it looks better with the roof rack...I feel it breaks up the "boxiness" of the truck.
 

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Shovelhd

I have a Silver RTL-Navi no roof rack and have the noise over 40, I'd rather have gotten the rear mud flaps instead of the wind noise option, I'm waiting for my salesman to return from vacation to take him on a post purchase test drive. We will than drive every Ridge on the lot so they know its not just me!

P.S. The five passenger seating will come in handy so we can take the dealer owner a senior service rep, and the President of Honda Corp, I'll even pay for the coffee!!!!!

Gonzo
 

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Moved this over to our new category.
 

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I just installed my roof rack yesterday. Easy install. I almost cut the thing at the wrong place. Luckily I scored the line instead of actually cutting. Although I live in Canada where everything is metric, I still got confused - Canada went metric long after I finished school, so metric is still a pain for me.

Anyway, I'm thinking the roof rack might take its toll on gas mileage. If it's bad, I'll be taking it off and storing it until needed. I do a lot of freeway driving where the roof rack would make more of a difference.

I hope the roof trim pieces aren't too expensive.

The noise is there, but it isn't a high pitch whistling or a low hum. I can live with it. If you are worried about the noise, test drive a vehicle that has one on. A few Honda dealers around my area have RLs with accessories on them.

Anyone notice a significant increase in fuel consumption with the roof rack on?
 

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We drove with the moonroof open before adding the roofrack specifically so we could tell if there was an increase in wind noise. The answer is, yes there was, but it is negligible except with the moonroof open and going over about 40 MPH. We cut that noise considerably by sliding the cross bars all the way to the back. Now I don't notice it in the least.

Do not add the roofrack if you have the moonroof visor, unless you take the visor off. That is supposed to make some terrible turbulance.

We haven't got enough miles on our truck yet to say if there was any change due to adding the roofrack. We barely hit our 600 miles mark.
 

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I just installed my roof rack. It went very well, thanks in great part to the posts here. No stripped screws, etc. :)

I do have a question though...
Step #11 of the install instructions says: "To reduce wind noise, cut the rubber molding from each roof rack and install the pieces of the rubber molding you just cut between the crossbars."

Can anyone explain what that step means? What rubber molding gets cut, and where do you install it? :confused:

Any reasonable explanations are accepted, but the truth is preferred. :D
 

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Rick Walker said:
I just installed my roof rack. It went very well, thanks in great part to the posts here. No stripped screws, etc. :)

I do have a question though...
Step #11 of the install instructions says: "To reduce wind noise, cut the rubber molding from each roof rack and install the pieces of the rubber molding you just cut between the crossbars."

Can anyone explain what that step means? What rubber molding gets cut, and where do you install it? :confused:

Any reasonable explanations are accepted, but the truth is preferred. :D
It is not very clear but they mean the molding that you cut....

Pic #1 - Shows the molding in question

Pic #2 - Make sure your cross bars are facing the correct way. (red circle)

I gave up and removed my cross bars due to wind noise. (Since I bought them for looks anyway)

TL
 

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Hi tlaudio! - I don't agree that they are talking about the molding cut in step 4...

Step 4 instructs on cutting the molding...
Step 5 & 6 instructs on placing the cut pieces of molding into the roof channels...

What I am talking about is step 11 that says:
Rick Walker said:
"To reduce wind noise, cut the rubber molding from each roof rack and install the pieces of the rubber molding you just cut between the crossbars."
Here's the instructions for reference:
View attachment roofrack.pdf

I'm wondering if they are talking about the rubber that is embedded in the top of the crossbars??? :confused:
 
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