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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Finally found the time to install these and it took my 6-hrs from start to finish. The hardest part was taking the dust shields off with the hubs still in place.

Before the pictures, here are some of the install items.

Rotora - 6 piston Front calipers
Rotora - 4 piston Rear calipers
Rotora - Stainless steel lines Front & back
Rotora - 355 x 32 mm Front slotted & vented rotors
Rotora - 355 x 29 mm Rear slotted & vented rotors

Velox Apex 18 x 8.5 +40mm offset wheels - Black Metallic
Hankook Dynapro ATM RF10 255/60-R18 tires

Here are some data for everyone who many be interested in it.

Wheel/Tire
2010 RT Steel wheels + 245/70-R17 General Grabber AT2 - 65.05lbs/corner (inflated @ 38psi)
Velox Apex wheels + 255/60-R18 Dynapro RF10 - 58.87lbs/corner (inflated @ 38psi)

Brakes
FRONT OEM Brakes (Hawk Rotor, Z36 pads, caliper, caliper bracket & SS line) - 36.00lbs/corner
Front Rotora Brakes (Rotor,pads,caliper, & ss lines) - 29.80lbs/corner

REAR OEM Brakes(StopTech rotors, pads, caliper, caliper bracket & ss lines) -
REAR Rotora Brakes (rotor, pads, caliper, & SS lines) - 25.20lbs/corner.

Basic Tools needed

Adjustable wrench
Ant-seize compound.
Brake line wrench 10mm/12mm
Brake parts cleaner
Breaker bar – 24”
Chisel w/rubber grip
Hammer
Hydraulic jack - minimum lift of 18.00 in
Impact wrench, basic & cordless
Jack Stands - With a min lift of 18 inches
Liquid lubricant – WD-40/PB Blaster/Liquid wrench, etc
Locking pliers
Ratchet extension
Ratchets
Screw driver – w/various bits
Sockets – 10mm to 19mm
Torque wrench
Wrench, regular – 10mm/12mm

NOTE: The instructions that come with the Brake kit is very thorough and as long as you are mechanically inclined and can read & follow directions, you are good to go. Having a friend would help as they can tackle a corner when you are doing one. I did this by myself and it took my 6-hrs with the truck on 4 jack stands and no air tools. Should take a shop about 3 to 4 hours.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
More progress pictures
Wheel to caliper clearance approx 5mm
rear and front tire stance. Front is a tad past the OEM mud flaps, but the rears are well within the Husky mudflaps.
 

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Glad you finally found the time to put these goodies on!

That's some impressive unsprung weight loss between the wheel/tire and the brake components!

Here's a few questions for you . . .

Did you reinstall some sort of dust shields after the old ones were cut off? If not do you think they will be missed?

Did you have any trouble disconnecting the factory flex line from the hard line union? I have found that the flare fittings on the hard lines tend to get locked in place causing the flex line to twist. Any tricks on that one?

You replaced your master cylinder too? What technique did you use to get all that air out of the system?

How much $ for the brake kit? Is there an associated part # for the Ridge? Is there a lead time or do they have the kit on the shelf? . . .PLEASE POST COST, THANKS!

HOW DOES IT PERFORM????

Thanks and nice work!
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Did you reinstall some sort of dust shields after the old ones were cut off? If not do you think they will be missed?
- No dust shield were reinstalled. Since the caliper is an enclosed system with no exposed or sliding units like the OEM floating design, the is no need to reinstall any shielding. Also, the calipers are made of Aluminum so cooling these calipers (in severe cases) is best if no airflow is restricted.

Did you have any trouble disconnecting the factory flex line from the hard line union? I have found that the flare fittings on the hard lines tend to get locked in place causing the flex line to twist. Any tricks on that one?
- I had no trouble getting them to loosen. My truck sits a tad over 220K miles and I am in NJ and have seen many winters and road salts. I used the adjustable wrench to hold the flex line end and a 10mm brake line wrench (flare wrench) to break them loose. I also changed my master cylinder (as it was bad) to an OEM one and that used a 12mm and that too was not hard. A flathead screw driver to pop those retaining clips was not too bad either. Honestly, I did not use any lubricating spray on any of these fittings, which tells me that the regular car wash with underbody cleaning works :)

You replaced your master cylinder too? What technique did you use to get all that air out of the system?
- Traditional pumping of the brakes, hold to firm and bleed the brakes. I had to do this myself so it is not the greatest yet. I used a vacuum pump to create vacuum on the bleed valves first, then pressurize the system the traditional way and held the pedal down with my cargo/Load bar & seat, and then bled the system. Since there are two bleed valves per caliper, you gotta do 8-locations and at least 3 times a bleed valve. I have to do it again and use a help of my bro-in-law as It is not fully bled yet. Will do doing it again tomorrow.

How much $ for the brake kit? Is there an associated part # for the Ridge? Is there a lead time or do they have the kit on the shelf? . . .PLEASE POST COST, THANKS!
- the kits are not on the shelf and they do carry part numbers for the 4/2-piston and 6/4-piston. I got the 6 piston front and 4-piston rear. You could do all 4-piston upfront and 2-piston rear if you want.
For a 4/2-piston kit it is RFK.215.03 (FRONT-$2595.00) and RFK.331.01 (REAR - $2395.00)
For a 6/4-piston kit, it is RFK.215.04 (FRONT - $2995.00) and RFK.331.02 (REAR-$2595.00)
The average lead time is between 7 days to 11 days, depending on how busy they are.
Since I am probably one of the very very very few G1s with the Rotora Kit, I was able to get a deal with them for my kit. Rather than $5590.00 plus shipping, I got the whole kit for $3700.00 shipped.
For about a year, I have been researching a BBK for the Ridgeline and communicated with Brembo USA, Brembo Italy, StopTech, Wilwood, Fast Brakes, and RolloFace Performance. None of them (besides StopTech) were able to match the production timeline, let alone even entertain a possible production. StopTech quoted me $6890.00 and I have to use 19" wheels since they only offer with a 380mm x 32mm rotor sizing. Sentiments aside, as I wanted StopTechs, the killer was the 19"wheel requirement, and they were few wheels. With the StopTech and aftermarket 19" wheels and tires, the total cost would have been around $10,000 and that is being very frugal. I had a requirement of just an 18" wheel due to the truck being a daily driver and the places I visit are not like the flat roads of Florida.
No one would even work on a mix-and-match style as they had no interest or clue in their own design specs.



HOW DOES IT PERFORM????
- Funny you should ask. When I opened up the boxes on Thursday, I came to the realization that the jet nuts, essentially the 8 nuts and washers that secure the 4 calipers to the caliper bracket were not shipped. :( i should have checked the boxes when I got them over a month ago, but life was just too busy. To get the car out of my garage and get the calipers in place to bleed them, I had to go hunting to three different stores on Thursday at 7pm looking for a nut that can go the caliper stud and also clear the counter-sunk hole on the caliper. The nut was a 7/16-20 and it was in Home Depot...... the last store I went, 5 minutes before closing. Rotora shipped me the jet nuts and washer, but did not overnight so it was ****ty on their part (UPDATE: got it today). I will definitely hold it against them for this. Had I given it to a shop to do this, I would have paid through my ass for the days they would have to hold my truck. So now, my truck sits in the driveway for now awaiting the correct washer and nuts so I can essentially go and bed the pads in. They are bit of a different bedding process than I am used to, so I have to do it after 10pm when the traffic is light and I have to jump on I-95 to properly do it.

Lesson to take away is this, when you order something, when it arrives, always go through the checklist of items that are in the packaging slip against the items in the box (Rotora did not send me a packaging slip, but just the invoice and product details) or use the instruction booklet and write down the parts used against what was shipped. Now I get to drive around in my parent's '09 Fit that has not been washed in 10-months..........

Once I get the truck fully dialed in, I will surely update on how the tires & brakes perform. Fully installed, 355mm do not look bigger than the 320mm OEM rotors, but When you hold them side by side, it is obvious. 5 years down the road, I have other plans for the truck as it will be time for it to retire and my odyssey will be paid off. Who knows what this G1 will be turned into..... :)
 

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So do the rears have an internal “drum” for the parking brake?

I have subscribed and will be following up

Also do you want the other thread closed?
 

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Thanks for the detailed answers to my questions!

Your "discounted" cost is about what I expected. Not inexpensive enough to make it a no brainer and not so crazy expensive as to make it a no frickin way. . . .At least from my perspective:) Do you think that they would be willing to go with the price you paid for other interested parties?

On my 06 when I went to swap the factory flex line for a braided stainless one on my front calipers the flare nut was locked hard to the hard line. It is supposed to spin freely so the removal process is supposed to be as you describe . . .hold the flex line fitting still and turn the flare fitting with a proper fitting wrench . . . .The problem was when I did that on my 06, the hard line itself started to twist. If you are not paying attention and you really twist the hard line, you are going to be VERY SORRY! My solution was to hold the flare fitting still and turn the entire flex line. This was a PIA but it worked . . .

Sorry to hear that the mounting bolts didn't make it. That must have been incredibly frustrating. Sure it would have been smart to check the boxes when you first received the stuff. I probably wouldn't have . . . .Only thing I would add to your takeaway is that on the day of the actual install with something like this, make sure you have what you need before you "jump off the cliff."

For your replacement master cylinder, did you use a OEM Ridgeline one or something else? I can't quite follow what you meant . . .

Once you get the air out of the system and the proper bolts installed, please let us know your thoughts. It would have been cool to measure dry braking distances before and after but I know that is a PIA. Maybe you could do some measurements and compare to some GenI numbers from magazine test?

Thanks for being the test dummy on this one! I am personally quite excited and will now have to decide how much I love my GenI (and how much I hate the stock brakes)!
 

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I’ve often wondered, if any of the various BMW SUV setups would fit, since various BMW wheels fit directly. I haven’t done any real research. But with the prices you posted, it motivates me to do some more research. Still quite impressed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
@Carsmak: The rears do have the rotor hat that acts as the drum for the parking brake. Yes, you are more than welcome to close my other thread. Many thanks!

@eurban: I am sure they will honor the price for interested parties. During the spring is when they have their 'Spring Sale' and the rep I dealt with is Loren (its a male btw). The jet nuts were installed this afternoon and the brakes were re-bled. I had some air still left in the system. Tonight, I get to bed the brakes in. I replaced the master cylinder with the stock OEM one. The kit is made to work with the stock one, so no modification is required. Even the StopTech kit is made to work with the OEM master cylinder. Gone are the days when one has to change the master cylinder and proportioning valves to use the larger brakes. I will try and get the stopping distance from 60mph. My bed-in process calls for TEN (10) 60mph to 5mph runs.

Car & Driver long term test says the G1 stopped at 195 feet and the G2 stopping at 191feet. This is from 70mph to 0mph.
C&D G1 link >> https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15144343/2006-honda-ridgeline-rtl-long-term-road-test/ (braking improved to 180' by the end of the test)
C&D G2 link >> https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a25606089/2019-honda-ridgeline-reliability-maintenance-update-20k/ (braking distance remained constant at 191' by end of test)



One thing to note is that the black color option is the only hard anodized option. I chose that for its daily use in the North East with road salt. States that do not see severe weather and road salt could choose other color options.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
UPDATE #1 11/05/2018

BRAKES:

I had the opportunity to bed the brakes last night after 10pm. Luckily I-95 (NJ TPK) had barely any vehicles on the truck lane so the Right most lane was my friend. Drove for about 10 miles to get the tires warm before doing the bedding as it is not recommended to have the ABS engage during the process. The roads were dry and clean. I was able to do 10 consecutive 60mph to 5mph to bed the brakes. The smell was typical of the initial burn in and the fade was noticeable as it should. Then drove it for another 10 miles to cool the brakes, stopped & checked the temp (I could touch the rotor and hat without burning myself). Then I did 1 more of the bed-in process. Rotora recommends that you may have to do up to 3 of these bed-in process before having the brakes work at the peak.

After that, I turned back around and headed home. Did two tests of 60-0 and honestly felt like my eye balls were going to pop out. BTW, the brakes are too good that I was able to engage the ABS on a flat dry surface. The initial bite is as expected and the progression is linear and uninterrupted. Pedal feel is smooth and linear as well. The fade is absent and looks like the head dissipation is pretty good. The brake balance, with larger rear ratio to front than OEM, the truck does not dive as it did before under hard braking.

WHEELS/TIRES

The tires ride very very very well. The road/tire noise is almost as OEM. The bump absorption both high frequency and low frequency are light years beyond the Grabber AT2/OEM steel combo. High Frequency bumps are the shoulder strips on the highway and the low frequency as pot holes and inconsistent road imperfections. With the 255 width tires, I really do have a lot more lateral grip than before. Even more than the Nitto Grapplers, which as about as soft as the Dynapros. The tires are now at 35psi. Vehicle acceleration is also very smooth.
With the Grabber AT2/Steel combo, the car had a sluggish roll out from dead stop. I never felt the truck smooth out till the engine hit the Vtech band and shifted to carry momentum into 2nd gear.
With the Dyanapro RF10s/Velox combo, the light-weight is very obvious when you start rolling. The truck rolls smooth and linear and I do not need to hit Vtech to get momentum. Turn ins and change in speed is attained with no drama.
Many thanks to Dan over @Discount Tire for directing me to the Dynapro RF10s. Great advice!

CONCERNS:
There is a scrape when turning right. I did not see any rub when the vehicle was in static and on jacks, but it almost sounds like a scraping brakes. However, it cannot be as I do not have that going straight or turning left. I also changed the steering balljoints/Tie-rod ends (outboard) and need to get an alignment tomorrow. Will have the shop do the alignment and see if they can track down the scraping sound.

Will update once I do more testing.
 

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I thought we were friends, but here you are posting this kinda stuff.

With all the things needing attention on my beloved Swiss-Army-Knife-almost-a-truck 06 Ridge... like, cracks in the leather, aging paint, an almost comical sagging headliner and a box full of audio gear waiting to be installed, you had to go and add this to my endless, OCD driven list of must haves. That I can't find time for.

With a suspension rebuild is in my future, I was hoping to get away with caliper rebuild kits, pads, rotors and some fancy paint. But NOOOOOOOooo. Now I've got this in my head.

Thanks a lot buddy. :)

Farging beautious!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
@OhSix, trust me, we are still buds. I did you a huge favor of being the guinea pig and testing this out. So when the time comes, you know it works and you have a peace of mind. :)

I am waiting to see how my suspension handles and so far, it seems to be okay. At 220K miles, I see some rust and over stroking of the OEM shocks and I am keeping my eyes open on the KW Version-3s. Tire Rack has them for $2371 while others have them for $2550
I could test it out and tell you how it is ;)
 

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@OhSix, trust me, we are still buds. I did you a huge favor of being the guinea pig and testing this out. So when the time comes, you know it works and you have a peace of mind. :)

I am waiting to see how my suspension handles and so far, it seems to be okay. At 220K miles, I see some rust and over stroking of the OEM shocks and I am keeping my eyes open on the KW Version-3s. Tire Rack has them for $2371 while others have them for $2550
I could test it out and tell you how it is ;)
The clamping power and distribution of force of those 6 piston calipers must be awesome!

And WOO WEE, talk about pulling the trigger on an upgrade! Steelies to lovely new rubber & rims showcasing new slammers. With positive offset, no less!

I'll be paying close attention to your feedback.

Love your trail blazing spirit!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
UPDATE: 11/12/2018

I was able to diagnose the scraping sound on right turns. it happened to be the one rotor, Driver side Front, that was not secured to the hub using a set screw. It was rubbing on the pads, though I never had that with my previous performance OEM setup. Luckily there were two options for the setscrew and one ate my stainless steel set-screw. I was able to use the other one, but had to use a thin crush washer to hold it in place as the rust in the holes were pretty bad. Now the scraping noise is gone. The dust is typical of any braking system and after 5 days of use, the amount of brake dust around the inner wheel barrel and on the calipers is typical. The rotors rust less than my StopTechs and those rusted less than OEMs. I can foresee the need to get caliper piston spreader when the time comes to change the pads, which will probably not be in the next 50K miles.

@OhSix: It is amazing how immediate the brakes respond. With minimal travel, I get braking. Braking is very linear and the brake force is linear from the initial bite. There is no brake fade whatsoever and you can easily lock up the brakes/engage the ABS from 60mph or 70 mph. Heat dissipation is amazing and with lower unsprung weight, you can really feel the difference in the way the vehicle rolls from a standstill and accelerates around corners. There is still some body roll due to the OEM shocks/springs, but it is natural. I have to caution myself to not brake too late as I fear I may get rear ended by the car behind me. It truly does give you the confidence that you could stop in an emergency.

I hope that members do see the benefit of this investment as a safety improvement, and not just a statement piece.
 

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I am a bit confused as to how the lack of a set screw could be the culprit for your sound. . .Once the wheels lugs are torqued down, the rotor is held firmly against the hub. The set screws really only serve to hold the rotor to the hub while the wheel is removed. This is especially important while the vehicle is being put together on the assembly line. . .

You say that your pedal now has minimal travel? So would you now characterize the pedal feel as being firm? The stock setup on both Gen's of the Ridgeline has longish pedal travel and less than firm feel that no amount of brake bleeding can solve. Braided lines don't help much either. I always figured it was the nature of the complete system, including the linkage, the master cylinder, the abs components and the calipers. It would be interesting to know if the calipers themselves where the biggest contributor to the Ridge's sloppy pedal feel.

For giggles yesterday I put all the pieces necessary for a MDX front brake swap (onto a Ridgeline) into a shopping cart on Rockauto. This included remanned calipers with hangers (core charge included since you won't be able to send in the proper core), Stoptech drilled / slotted rotors, and Power Stop Z23 pads. The cost was $588 including shipping. It would undoubtedly increase braking performance and maybe improve pedal feel a bit. However it wouldn't have the Rotora setup's unsprung weight reduction or mind blowing stopping power. Still its probably the most financially tolerable brake performance upgrade for the Ridge.

Smuf,
Please keep us posted as time goes by and do elaborate a bit more on the pedal feel. How about some measured stopping distances? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
@eurban: I am on the same boat as you as I was perplexed as well. After a week's worth of driving, I was able to diagnose where the noise was coming from, driver side front. The scraping sound was similar to a seized caliper pressing the pads to the rotor. I also noted that the noise was absent when the turn was made and I was on the brakes. When the noise happened, it did not matter what speed I was doing and the top center of the steering wheel had to move to the 1 O-Clock position before the sound; so it was minimal steering input before the noise.
The lug nuts are torqued to 95-ft lbs.
When I ran the OEM setup, I had no set screw in the DR. front and never had this noise or any vibration, so I am dumbfounded as well. Once I took the wheel off, I checked to see if there was any rubbing on any of the hardware, if the hardware was rubbing on the rotor or anything. There were no interference with anything and no weird scrapes or wear on any of the hardware either. The pads were square as well. The only thing I did different this time around after installing the set screw was to leave the wheel/tire in the air when torquing it down. I have around 200 miles before I have to take all the wheels off, inspect everything and re-torque the wheels.

Pedal travel:
Aside from the squishy brakes of the OEM design, the brakes did not engage (even after a new OEM pad/rotor) till the pedal was almost 30% down the travel stroke. Now, with the Rotora setup, I can assure you that I get the brake feedback and hear the pad-to-rotor contact almost 15% of the travel stroke. I am one of those guys who does not lift his whole foot off the floor to brake; my heel is still on the mat and my fore-foot depressed the brake pedal. Weird way to drive, I know.

Pedal Firmness
The pedal is firm because of a multitude of reasons besides the master cylinder and brake fluid being new. The caliper design is fixed and pistons are opposed, unlike the floating caliper of the OEM design. The pad surface area is much larger and rotor diameter is about 11% larger than OEM and 14.3% thicker than OEM. I believe this combination yields a much higher braking torque with no caliper movement. Just speaking from a pure engineering design perspective, I believe this combination is the cause of the firmness.

Braided lines
Braided lines dont do much, and I have mentioned that in many threads. I felt ZERO difference between the rubber and the braided lines, with everything else the same. Mind you, back in 2016 (March maybe) I had the lines changed and the fluid fully changed (master cylinder was still the original) and I felt NO difference in the feedback and feel. The only thing I got was a peace of mind that my 7-month pregnant wife had a pretty decent braking on a truck with around 170K miles and one less thing I had to worry about as she drove it for around 2-years with our new born son.

With the MDX setup, I will surely not use the Z23 pads. They are essentially OEM replacement and I honestly hated them with a passion. The Z36/StopTech were a perfect marriage and once they grabbed, they stopped (though you had to stand on them once they got hot). The MDX rotor is around 3.13% larger than our OEM and with more clamping force from the larger piston calipers and larger pad surface area, it will surely be noticeable. I will find time to start a new thread on the Rotora setup alone so that I can share my data compilation of other OEM rotors and calipers that I gathered over the course of the year. Information such as piston surface area, mounting hole dimensions, vehicles they came in, etc etc would help someone who has the ability to have a BBK under a budget by making brackets. Had I had the time and a spare knuckle to play with, I would have surely gone with a custom solution where all one had to do was just make the bracket and source the calipers/lines.

Lastly, the weather has not been great so far in NJ, between cold and rain, it has not been conducive. I have to get the brakes re-bed tonight and I will get the stopping times. The Torque App I use seems to have the 0-60mph and 60-0mph, but in times. Simple math would tell me the distance :)
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
UPDATE 11/14/18

Dynapro RF10 in rain

Had some heavy downpour this week, especially yesterday morning where I was able to truly test the traction of these tires. I have to say I am not impressed much. They do 'wander' enough to cause me a concern. I have had the Nitto Terra Grapplers and General Grabber AT2s and they were very solid and confident at this speed and depth. The water was approximately 3 inches in a section and was at least 20 feet long with that depth. The other areas were small puddles that were marginally deep and at some parts were 'deep enough'. Hitting these at around 40mph was nerve-wracking. Traction light never came on, but truck did drift. These tires do not 'cut' through the waters like the Grabber AT2s did.

Light snow is predicted for tomorrow and the ground is supposed to be cold enough that icing might occur. Will report on how the tires feel on that.
 

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Still its probably the most financially tolerable brake performance upgrade for the Ridge.
Yup, my MDX swap came to around $520. Thought that was steep....now I feel cheap :|
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
UPDATE 11/14/18

Dynapro RF10 in SNOW

We got around 4" to 5" of snow, from my work to home yesterday. The snow was a heavy snow which turned into sleet. Ground temperature was 29F at the start of the day. Lot of areas were compacted snow, which turned into ice. Below assessment was based on 35mph to 40mph vehicle speed.
  • The Dynapro RF10 would be on the very bottom on the list for snow traction. #1 would be the Grabber AT2 (3PMSF rated) & #2 would be the Terra Grapplers (NOT 3PMSF rated).
  • The tires were not finding traction and 'floated' on every single patch of compacted snow it hit.
  • Deep snow traction is non-existent. The AWD sorted it out, especially on inclines, but the tire was not grabbing by itself.
  • Under steer was very prominent on turns and I had to control it by adjusting steering and throttle.
  • Stopping was acceptable without engaging ABS
  • Traction on ice is comparable to OEM tires, definitely not what is expected from a 3PMSF rated AT tire. I am making this assessment based on my Grabber AT2
  • The tire grooves did a good job in ejecting snow and debris as I did not find anything stuck.
  • I will rate this tire 7.5/10 in snow.
@Discount Tire: The above is my feedback, in case you guys needed it.
 
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