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i realize some of my questions have been answered already in this forum. however i have some more questions regarding driving in the sand. I'm from ny & renting a house down in the outer banks in nc in a month or so. i already know the precautions about getting stuck as well as the usual procedures such as lowering down the tire pressure between 10-15 psi, pulling the 2 fuses under the hood & use my head as far as common sense goes. also, only hit the 4-wheel button on the dash ONLY if i get stuck & once rolling disengage. one question is I'm not sure if something is wrong with my 4-wheel button on dash since it does not light up, whether a quick press or i hold it down & release. possibly my fuse is bad? another thing is once i hit the sand i realize i must take out tire pressure. since I'm a contractor i will bring w me my air compressor which goes up to 120psi but i need power since there are no outlets on the beach, LOL! i stopped by my local auto zone & found some Duralast inverters that hook up directly to the truck battery. my issue is what wattage is needed & what is overkill? they have a 400 watt(800 peak), a 750 watt(1,500 peak) & a 1,000 watt(2,000 peak). also any other concerns i should be aware of & am i good to go.......because my wife & i really, really want to rent this house directly on sand which has about a 3 mile drive on the sand. thanks for all your help!!!
 

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VTM-4 Lock only engages in first, second, or reverse, not Drive.

Unless you need the inverter for other purposes, I'd recommend buying one of the all-in-one inflator pumps and battery jumpers. They run about $60 and are very handy to have around for inflating all sorts of things as well as for emergency jump starts. They take awhile on four big tires, but are so convenient otherwise I love 'em.

These things: http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=12+volt+compressor+jump+start&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8#q=12+volt+compressor+jump+start&hl=en&client=safari&sa=X&rls=en&tbs=p_ord:p&tbm=shop&prmd=imvns&ei=3zneT-WhOsnG6AHXvLymCw&ved=0CB8Quw0oAQ&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=e6b8d25da891941b&biw=974&bih=801

If you want the inverter you can do the calculation (or google it) from what your compressor's current draw and voltage is. It's printed or stamped on there somewhere by law.

KeS
 

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Another vote for the 12v compressor, instead of going for an inverter.

Chip H.
 

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Bulb might be out as well... I just replaced 14 bulbs!! 11 burned and figured replace the rest i had.. Not cheap but looking good now.. What a joke these bulbs are..from honda.. Wifes crv replaced 6
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks guys for all ur responses. I'm a bit confused though. since i have my compressor which the gauge goes up to 120psi i might as well use it. so wouldn't i still need an inverter to plug the 110 plug into it thus connecting it to the truck battery? as far as the light on dash for 4wd, it must be either a bulb or fuse, but ill check fuse first since more accessible than taking dash apart to check bulb.
 

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What we're saying is that your current industrial compressor will draw too much current. So you should buy one of the small 12v compressors that plug into the lighter socket.

Yes, it'll take longer to inflate your tires, but they're smaller, and you don't need a separate inverter (which will cost more). And you can keep it in the truck all the time, in case you need it by the side of the road some dark + stormy night.

Chip H.
 

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I would be surprized if you can find a inverter powerful enough to run your 110v Compressor and even if you could the cost would probably out weigh the price of a 12v compressor, which could easily fit into the trunk or under the rear seats. The 12v tire inflators can easily pump enough to fill your tires, though it won't be as fast as the 110v compressor.
So heres a 3rd vote for the tire inflator over a inverter...Sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
its not actually that bad.....the price of the inverters, especially if i already have the compressor. the cost of the inverters range from $60 for the 400 watt, $80 for the 750 watt & $100 for the 1,000 watt. what does "draw too much current" mean? wouldn't i be inflating tires with the car already on like when ur boosting a car? i have heard some negatives when plugging directly in cig lighter....burning out units! unless I'm missing the point then I'm confused & since i already have the biggest expense which is the compressor plus prob a fraction of time spent inflating tires this way, i figure for me its the way to go? thanks again everybody for input!
 

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its not actually that bad.....the price of the inverters, especially if i already have the compressor. the cost of the inverters range from $60 for the 400 watt, $80 for the 750 watt & $100 for the 1,000 watt. what does "draw too much current" mean? wouldn't i be inflating tires with the car already on like when ur boosting a car? i have heard some negatives when plugging directly in cig lighter....burning out units! unless I'm missing the point then I'm confused & since i already have the biggest expense which is the compressor plus prob a fraction of time spent inflating tires this way, i figure for me its the way to go? thanks again everybody for input!
Your compressor has a "start up" amp draw and a "run" amp draw.

Take the "start up" number and multiply it by 115.

You will need an inverter which has a peak output (in watts) greater than this calculated number.

Take the "run" number and multiply it by 115.

You will need an inverter, not only with the peak output determined above but also, having a constant output greater than this second calculated number.

An inverter of this size will require connection to the battery via dedicated leads.

Unless the inverter that you purchase is true sine wave, the current that it outputs is choppy, not smooth. A constant diet of this choppy current will shorten the life of your compressor.

That inverter is more than $50.

I have a couple of 110 volt portable compressors. I have true sine wave inverters that could power the smaller of my compressors. I also have a pair of Honda EU2000i generators.

I carry 12 volt direct drive inflator pumps in all of my vehicles. The right tool for the right job.
 

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Doesn't get much better than this - which I personally own. This is a totally independent compressor, jump starter, emergency light operation that stows perfectly under the rear seat. Charge it up at home, on the drive, or plug directly into AC outlet while in use. Be sure to buy the 500 amp version, not the smaller version and you can reload your air pressure fairly quickly with no worries of juicing your electricial system. Again, No inverter needed at all. A full charge from any (NYC or Corolla) wall plug lasts a surprisingly long time.

Whatever you decide.....DO NOT forget your favorite mosquito repellant.
 

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http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002X6VXL4/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B001U0FD8S&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=10QCQJTGR37YB4DHDE0C

Doesn't get much better than this - which I personally own. This is a totally independent compressor, jump starter, emergency light operation that stows perfectly under the rear seat. Charge it up at home, on the drive, or plug directly into AC outlet while in use. Be sure to buy the 500 amp version, not the smaller version and you can reload your air pressure fairly quickly with no worries of juicing your electricial system. Again, No inverter needed at all. A full charge from any (NYC or Corolla) wall plug lasts a surprisingly long time.

Whatever you decide.....DO NOT forget your favorite mosquito repellant.
Did you know mosquito's cannot see LED light?
 

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i realize some of my questions have been answered already in this forum. however i have some more questions regarding driving in the sand. I'm from ny & renting a house down in the outer banks in nc in a month or so. i already know the precautions about getting stuck as well as the usual procedures such as lowering down the tire pressure between 10-15 psi, pulling the 2 fuses under the hood & use my head as far as common sense goes. also, only hit the 4-wheel button on the dash ONLY if i get stuck & once rolling disengage. one question is I'm not sure if something is wrong with my 4-wheel button on dash since it does not light up, whether a quick press or i hold it down & release. possibly my fuse is bad? another thing is once i hit the sand i realize i must take out tire pressure. since I'm a contractor i will bring w me my air compressor which goes up to 120psi but i need power since there are no outlets on the beach, LOL! i stopped by my local auto zone & found some Duralast inverters that hook up directly to the truck battery. my issue is what wattage is needed & what is overkill? they have a 400 watt(800 peak), a 750 watt(1,500 peak) & a 1,000 watt(2,000 peak). also any other concerns i should be aware of & am i good to go.......because my wife & i really, really want to rent this house directly on sand which has about a 3 mile drive on the sand. thanks for all your help!!!
So how did your RL do in the OBX Sand ? I'll be up there in my RTL-E in 3 weeks and have wondered the same things as you. Still cringing at the thought of taking such an expensive rig out on the sand- period ! I do have to say though, I was under the impression you put it in SAND MODE upon entering the sand, not when you are maybe getting stuck- which may well be too late IMHO. The access ramps in the OBX are usually comprised of large granular, loose sand with deep troughs made by other vehicles - and ground clearance may become an issue as well. I've been out numerous times in a relative's Toyota 4 Runner in 4WD mode (OE tires, nothing special) and its a tank- we don't ever even air down the tires. Interesting to see full sized, lifted Fords (etc) with monster tires on them, airing down before entering the ramp/beach..... Seems a waste. Those are both different animals thant he RL, and ours have very generic 'all season' tires, nothing like an offroad tire.....IDK about up your way but the few derivable beaches in E Central (to N Central) FL are for the most part a very hard pack, fine type sand that a car can drive on- nothing at all like the OBX.
 

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So how did your RL do in the OBX Sand ? I'll be up there in my RTL-E in 3 weeks and have wondered the same things as you. Still cringing at the thought of taking such an expensive rig out on the sand- period ! I do have to say though, I was under the impression you put it in SAND MODE upon entering the sand, not when you are maybe getting stuck- which may well be too late IMHO. The access ramps in the OBX are usually comprised of large granular, loose sand with deep troughs made by other vehicles - and ground clearance may become an issue as well. I've been out numerous times in a relative's Toyota 4 Runner in 4WD mode (OE tires, nothing special) and its a tank- we don't ever even air down the tires. Interesting to see full sized, lifted Fords (etc) with monster tires on them, airing down before entering the ramp/beach..... Seems a waste. Those are both different animals thant he RL, and ours have very generic 'all season' tires, nothing like an offroad tire.....IDK about up your way but the few derivable beaches in E Central (to N Central) FL are for the most part a very hard pack, fine type sand that a car can drive on- nothing at all like the OBX.
Your E is a GenII and the OP drives (drove? He posted in 2012) a GenI which doesn't have a Sand Mode. . .
I just came back from a vacation to the 4wd area of Carova Beach. We used my 2014 (GenI) Ridgeline and it got us the there (8 miles each way on the sand) and back but ground clearance was definitely the limiting factor rather than traction. Your GenII has even less ground clearnance than the GenI so in rutted areas you will likely be scraping the sand at times.
Your previous experience in the 4 Runner and not airing down is believable but I must say that I saw PLENTY of stuck conventional 4wd trucks / SUVs who most likely didn't air down. Some of these were serious looking rigs that were lifted and had AT tires on them. I speculate that they didn't air down, started to slip and dug themselves in by spinning their wheels. A couple of them were up to their axles in sand that my Ridge cruised easily over. . .
For our trip I had the Ridgeline at around 18psi and it was a beast in the sand as far as traction was concerned. It was however, the rutted areas that were problematic. Most vehicles had more like 10 inches of ground clearance and the sand in between the tire tracks was often "plowed" to that height rather than the 8ish inches that my Ridge has. We never got stuck but we were definitely plowing sand at times.
Bottom line is that my GenI survived just fine but you will likely be scraping the sand and potentially damaging the plastic under parts up front. You should absolutely air down and I would certainly put it in sand mode before entering the sand.
 
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