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Here's a table showing "registration fee" by state, but based on posts above for TX, CA, and HI the numbers here don't include everything that must be paid for annual renewal: Car Registration Fees By State 2020
That chart makes it look like Colorado is a "tax friendly"state, which it certainly is not. We pay 8% tax when we purchase our vehicle. Here is an example of what @CentexG2 is referring with regard to extra fees! I especially like the one at the bottom, "Road Safety Surcharge."


tax.jpg
 

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I especially like the one at the bottom, "Road Safety Surcharge."
Lol!

Is that line item "Specific Ownership Tax" a part of your annual renewal fee paid in CO? Is that one set by vehicle type, weight, 'appraised value' ..... or? (just curious)

More FYI than anyone wants ... in TX private vehicle sales are taxed at the 6.25% rate when the title is transferred. In order to eliminate 'funny games' (false "lowballing") with claimed purchase price, a number of years ago a "Presumptive Value" system was instituted to set the minimum value for used-vehicle private-transaction sales-tax calculation ....


Yeah, the "Presumptive" value is often far below actual market / transaction price paid, so some folks still report a false transaction price near that lower presumptive value limit. There's almost always ways to 'game' a system when lack of personal integrity is involved. So it goes.
 

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Yes, @CentexG2, the "Specific Ownership Tax" is based upon the value of the vehicle and age of the vehicle.

Specific_Ownership_Taxes_common.jpg


Calculating the specific ownership tax. Once the class of vehicle and the registration year are known, it is possible to calculate the specific ownership tax.

For example, the taxable value of a family car would be calculated at 85 percent of the MSRP because it is a Class C vehicle. If it had an MSRP of $30,000, the following calculation would be applied to find the taxable value: $30,000 MSRP x 0.85 = $25,500. If this is the first year of ownership, the taxable value is then multiplied by a tax rate of 2.1%. The specific ownership tax would be $25,500 x .025 = $637.00. If you add that to the 8% sales tax, $25,500 x .08 = $2,040, purchasing a new vehicle is an expensive proposition.

If this is the vehicle's second year of registration, the taxable value is then multiplied by a tax rate of 1.5 percent to determine the specific ownership tax. $25,500 x 0.015 = $382.50 This calculation results in a specific ownership tax of $382.50 for the given vehicle for that particular year of registration.
 

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Your TOWN gets income off the value of your vehicle? $1000 bucks for a $40,000 truck? What the hell!, I hate to ask what your property taxes are like. That is one of the most insane taxes I have ever heard of, what is the logic behind that?
I don't get the justification, other than promoting people to buy old used cars that are cheaper and probably less environmentally friendly ...
Well, the idea is that it's supposed to go towards road repairs, but in practice, it goes into the town's general fund, without specific earmarks. The valuation drops fairly quickly, and it's usually less than blue book retail value, but yeah, another freakin tax.
 

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Here in Denver, CO the license plates costs for my 2017 Ridgeline, which I purchased in 2016:
  • $585 for the first year
  • $485 the second year
  • $363 the third year
We also have bi-annual emissions tests ($35), but a new vehicle is exempt for the first 5 years. I guess I would consider Colorado to be somewhere in the middle ground for licensing costs.

We do have state income tax here in Colorado and they do tax Social Security benefits, so maybe I should not feel so fortunate.
This is good to know as I live in Jeffco and am about to pull the trigger on a 2020 RTL-E. What you quoted was much cheaper than the first year of my 2012 Acura TL, which was over $700--in 2012.
 

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That chart makes it look like Colorado is a "tax friendly"state, which it certainly is not. We pay 8% tax when we purchase our vehicle. Here is an example of what @CentexG2 is referring with regard to extra fees! I especially like the one at the bottom, "Road Safety Surcharge."
I just looked at the bill of sale for my Acura (in Sept 2012) and my state sales tax was 2.9 percent, based on 80123 zip code (unincorporated Jeffco, no city tax), and RTD tax of 1.1 percent, total of 4%. Has something changed, or does the city tax you paid by living in Denver make up the difference?
 

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The registration fees in NC look like this for 2020. You also have to pay your vehicle property taxes when you renew the registration.

My Pilot costs $36. The Ridgeline is $56.50 because of the max weight. I guess I should count myself lucky the state didn't use GVWR which is 6050 lbs.

I'm not sure what they based the Pilot on since I believe the empty weight (curb weight includes a full tank of fuel) is close to the same as the Ridgeline.

Honda shows the 2006 Pilot EX-L 4wd as 4524 lbs curb weight and the 2008 Ridgeline RTS at 4491 lbs.

View attachment 400839
 

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I just looked at the bill of sale for my Acura (in Sept 2012) and my state sales tax was 2.9 percent, based on 80123 zip code (unincorporated Jeffco, no city tax), and RTD tax of 1.1 percent, total of 4%. Has something changed, or does the city tax you paid by living in Denver make up the difference?
I actually live in Thornton and yes, the city tax makes up the difference. Thornton has one of the highest sales tax rates in the Denver area. When I lived in Brighton, CO, (unincorporated Adams County) and my sales tax was around 4%, also.
 
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