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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, this is not good. I bought my truck in march and I mentioned this situation somewhere on this site awhile back. Shortly after I had my truck, we had a very wet snow about 8". I drove to work that day and when I came out to go home as I got to about 40mph, a bag I had on the passenger seat starting jumping about 3" in the air and the steering wheel shook like mad. I pulled over and with everything so new did not know what to do. I started back on the road and drove slow home. I looked under the truck when I got home and ther was alot of snow packed underneath. The next day it had melted out and truck drove fine. We never had snow again until yesterday, which was almost the very same conditions. I went to work and when I came out EXACTLY the same thing happened. My steering wheel shook so hard I could not hang on to it. I got home and the next day it was fine. I only have to drive 2miles home. I cant imagine going any farther with this event. There is no doubt in my mind we will here more of this from others as soon as the snow starts. I have no idea what to do, I am going to the dealer on dec. 9.:(
 

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Is there a possilbility of snow getting packed on the inside of the wheels, causing an imbalance. Since it drove fine after the snow melted, that may be an indicator.
 

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I had that happen with my other 4wd vehicle after a large snow. It shook the car, when the snow melted, no problems. I think it's snow on the wheels. Has anyone else had this problem? I know that others have driven in the snow.
 

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I too know that packed snow can throw off wheel balance as well as CV joints etc, with lots of snow and the right temps... happened everytime I went driving in heavy snow areas with past vehicles.
I can see a concern if this happens in everyday driving:eek:
Not that it snows everyday, but should we get hit with a deep snow, are we all gonna rattle & shake?
Has anyone else drivin in heavy snow conditons?
 

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Having packed snow and ice in the wheel(s) is more common than you think. It has happened many time in many different 4WDS and regular cars as well. I tend to plow through lots of snow. I just jump out clean the wheel(S) and get rolling.

Of course, if you find a mechanical reason after visiting the dealer, I would like to hear about it!
 

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I had this exact issue last year with my Forester. I took it to the dealership, they brought it inside and let it sit for a while before looking, there was a large puddle on the floor. They couldn't find anything wrong so they said it was probably ice built up in the wheels. I asked the obvious question, does Subaru make closed hubs that can be purchased for the car so that snow can't get inside so easily. I sort of worried about that with the Ridgeline too. People seem to like the open wheel design but it tends to be proned to snow and ice build up.

So far we haven't had a significant snow in the NE so I haven't had to deal with this, I am hoping these wheels will be easier to push the snow out of before it turns to ice.
 

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If that's all that it is, just power brake it for a few miles. You know, like Sammy Hagar said, "One foot on the brake and the other foot on the gas". The radiant heat from the rotors should take care of it :rolleyes: .
Actually, thanks for the heads-up. It is something to be aware of.
 

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If it's really a problem (which I have my doubts about) I'll wax the inside of the alloys with a paraffin block.
 

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I have experienced this with my Jeep Cherokee. It only happens with a very wet sticky snow which is a relatively rare event in central Alberta. The snow pack on the inside of the wheel rim causes an exaggerated wheel imbalance, or your lug nuts have come loose and your wheel is ready to fall off. Nothing like an inspection with a flaslight to be sure.

Gary P.
 

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Ultra-HOG said:
If that's all that it is, just power brake it for a few miles. You know, like Sammy Hagar said, "One foot on the brake and the other foot on the gas".
:eek: I guess if you're leasing thats a good idea ;)

This happened every snowstorm with my integra...snow/slush gets in your wheels and when you park, the resident heat in the wheel melts most of it away, As the wheel cools down the melting water is finding a nice resting place and freezing there. On the integra rims it was usually behind a spoke in one of the casting grooves. Then I'd get up to about 50 and think my tire blew.

Driving actually heats up your tires and consequently rims, especially cornering, accel/decel. so if you are driving on backroads I'd say to just cool it a bit and it will come off, unless you can see a big hunk of it when you approach the vehicle that you may be able to shake off. But do be careful because if you pick it off or something you may be tearing off your clearcoat.
If you're driving on the highway you may have to stop and at least remove the biggest offending piece of imbalance you can find.

But if you just persist in driving with it banging all over the place you will damage expensive things :)
 

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This is interesting, I've been driving 4WD vehicles since the 1960s and have driven in lots of deep snow but never experienced this. It's possible I just never drove fast enough. Where I live these days it's rare to have deep snow on the roads, the salt trucks start rolling with the first snowflake (and some towns dump a chemical on the roads before it even starts snowing).
 

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dbb said:
This is interesting, I've been driving 4WD vehicles since the 1960s and have driven in lots of deep snow but never experienced this. It's possible I just never drove fast enough. Where I live these days it's rare to have deep snow on the roads, the salt trucks start rolling with the first snowflake (and some towns dump a chemical on the roads before it even starts snowing).
Actually it has little to do with driving in deep snow, it has to do with driving in deep snow or being surrounded by deep snow, letting the snow get into your hubs/wheels and having them freeze during the day. You end up with essentially a block of ice on one side of the wheel, so as you drive it is like driving with a grossly unbalanced wheel. Driving through quickly you would likely throw the snow away from the tires not into the hubs. When I had this happen we had had over a foot of heavy wet snow fall and the snow was pushed up against my wheels. So over night some of the snow froze into the wheel (at least that is the only explanation I can find for it, when it happened), when I dug the car out the next day it wasn't noticeable that there was snow in the wheels. In almost 20 years of driving, I have had this happen once, but then I have also only had one car before the Ridgeline that had open hubs.
 

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captmiddy said:
Actually it has little to do with driving in deep snow, it has to do with driving in deep snow or being surrounded by deep snow, letting the snow get into your hubs/wheels and having them freeze during the day. You end up with essentially a block of ice on one side of the wheel, so as you drive it is like driving with a grossly unbalanced wheel. Driving through quickly you would likely throw the snow away from the tires not into the hubs. When I had this happen we had had over a foot of heavy wet snow fall and the snow was pushed up against my wheels. So over night some of the snow froze into the wheel (at least that is the only explanation I can find for it, when it happened), when I dug the car out the next day it wasn't noticeable that there was snow in the wheels. In almost 20 years of driving, I have had this happen once, but then I have also only had one car before the Ridgeline that had open hubs.

You said it better than I did!
 

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Speaking of iced-up wheels: My wife-to-be went to school in Potsdam, NY, a place that gets some pretty harsh winters and where paved surfaces end up covered with several inches of densely-packed snow by January. One year, an unusual warm spell occurred over the Xmas holiday period and the snow in the student parking lots turned to slush and all the cars that were left there sank into it down to the pavement, and then a cold front came through and the temperature dropped to well below zero and all the cars became entombed in ice. I came up to visit the next day and saw all these kids with hammers, axes, blow-torches, etc. trying to free their cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I am sure what happened is just like capt. describes. It was interesting that the first couple snow conditions I encountered with my truck were under the same conditions, and produced the same results. The troubling part is these conditions are not exactily rare. On the other hand both times as I was driving to work I was VERY impressed with the way the truck was handling in the conditions. So, Is this a problem? When it is happening, You bet it is. Any time you are sitting on the side of the road wondering if you should call a wrecker its worth a heads up. Thank You for your replies, I have been excited for winter travel in this truck, I am sure the other 99% of the time this truck will amaze us as usual. :)
 

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I have this same problem all year long...but only when I hear Rock n' Roll music from my XM!!:p
 
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