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So I need to buy a truck soon, both for work and personal; my job relates to construction and have quite a bit of work equipment to haul around and the personal belongs I'm starting to lug around with my car is increasing as well. Also the construction sites can be rough sometimes, sometimes there gravel, a lot of the other time's it's dirt, and often times those dirt roads are really rough, and uneven; every once in a while I'll scrap up against a really big rock or scrap where there's a dip or hump on the dirt roads(this even applies to gravel as well). Every now and then I gotta go park in the middle of a field of decently high grass or the side of the road. Should a Ridgeline be able to handle the construction work stuff or do I need to look at other trucks? I like the interior of the Ridgeline and heard it's really comfortable to drive and has amazing mpg but I'm not sure if it'll hold up for my work and also been hearing some people say not to use it as a work truck but I'm not 100% sure what to think about it.
Any thoughts on whether I should still pursue the Ridgeline or no?
 

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What kind of car have you been driving in these areas?
If it's a sedan, I would say yes the Ridgeline would be better, if you say a Wrangler, we may have an issue here.
What kind of ground clearance does you car have?
And if you go with a Ridge, you may want to invest in some skid plates to protect the bottom.
You may also want to invest in more aggressive tires - depending on the terrain and how often.
Also the AWD is a must. Which will help a lot.

More information is needed to give a better answer.

But the first thing you should do is test drive one :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What kind of car have you been driving in these areas?
If it's a sedan, I would say yes the Ridgeline would be better, if you say a Wrangler, we may have an issue here.
What kind of ground clearance does you car have?
And if you go with a Ridge, you may want to invest in some skid plates to protect the bottom.
You may also want to invest in more aggressive tires - depending on the terrain and how often.
Also the AWD is a must. Which will help a lot.

More information is needed to give a better answer.

But the first thing you should do is test drive one :cool:
I'll probably go and test drive one soon. But I currently have an 2005 Toyota Camry. Very low clearance. That combined with the 2wd makes it a pain on some of the construction sites I've been on, but it's managed to hold on... for now.
Also additional question, is it possible to put a lift on a Ridgeline(nothing too crazy though), for a bit more clearance and still get at least mid-high teens mpg?
 

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A G1 would stand up to that service. I don't know about a G2. I'll assume you're smart enough to determine for yourself whether ground clearance and bed size are adequate to your needs.

Bashing axles into rocks and through deep mud is best done with solid-axle pickups. They often have far more ground clearance apart from the axles, and dragging an axle through the mud is easy, whereas bottoming out the belly pan in mud is a nasty thing to try to get out of.

At least a couple members here with G1s used them daily on construction sites.
 

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2005 Toyota Camry
Ground clearance5.5 in.

2020 RIdgeline
Ground clearance7.9 in.

Putting a lift on the Ridgeline won't help you, you can get one, but it won't give you more clearance.
But you'll have a lot more than what you have now.
If your Camry is managing, you are going to LOVE the Ridgeline.

Test drive one tomorrow!
 

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A lift kit will definitely lift the Ridgeline, everything except the mounting points where the lower control arms meet the wheels. It is a suspension lift, not a body lift that is so common on many BoF trucks.

You can get lift kits for 0.5", 1.0", 1.5", 2.0" and Traxda recently introduced a 3.5" kit that has a pretty involved (expensive) installation. Lift kits are offered by Jsport, Traxxas and Truxx. Many people recommend not going over 1.5" as axle angles can get a little severe.

Make sure you have someone install the lift who is very familiar with CV joints. If not done correctly, it is easy to tear a boot or dislodge the CV joint and not get it re-installed correctly.

Also be aware that adding a lift may reduce the overall size of tire you can fit in the wheel well (rubbing at full lock). A larger lift could also possibly require recalibration of the Safety Sensing features.

Expect to lose 1.5 - 2 MPG with a lift, and more if you switch to aggressive tires.

As noted above, test drive all vehicles you're considering. Test drive them over similar roads if possible, including smooth and rough roads. Don't let the salesman turn the radio up while you're on rough roads, as you'll want to check for rattles.
 

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A lot to like with a Ridgeline and it has the trunk which you should like but it doesn't have a low range/transfer case. The cabin in plenty spacious and odds are that it could handle most of what you put it through. However, you shouldn't rule out a full size as IMO it will handle the offroad better with more ground clearance and a transfer case plus the interior space will be the best. You will obviously lose some MPG's with a full size.. RL is known as an on road light duty offroad truck. It is low to the ground and I've hit curbs in parking lots with the lower front plastic pieces so hopping curbs is not always a given. If you have never avoided anything because of your Camry then the RL is home run for you.The other midsize trucks I think you will find the interiors a bit cramped. Unfortunately, it's a sellers market now for trucks.
 

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I'd have loved my box-stock G2 AWD RL for my past career in civil engineering construction management, driving on sites from pre-clearing through all stages of sitework in any weather.

The in-bed trunk would have been hugely useful along with the two-way tailgate that's waaay under-rated IMO until you have it and get spoiled by it (sooo much easier to load / unload / reach stuff in the bed).

IMO for this application the G1 is cursed by the sloping bed-sides and buttresses that unarguably restrict front-of-bed 'reach-over' access compared to the G2's 'traditional' level bed sides. I would not want that for jobsite use myself, but YMMV.

As you compare to other 'similar size' trucks, be attentive to how much more of the RL bed is 'useable' in comparison to those with much larger encroaching wheel-wells (noting that between the almost negligible 'flat-topped bumps' of the RL 'wheel wells' there's 48" clear width that no other midsize can match).

IMO the only 'downside' of the RL is the lack of a rubber floormat / vinyl seats 'work-truck trim', but there's lots of floor-liner and seat-cover options to mitigate that. The hours on streets between jobsites will be superior without a doubt compared to the 'competition'.

If you've been 'making do' with your Camry on jobsites, the RL will be nothing less than a HUGE upgrade by every possible measure, IMO / IME / BTDT. That's as-delivered right off the showroom floor with AWD.
 

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So I need to buy a truck soon, both for work and personal; my job relates to construction and have quite a bit of work equipment to haul around and the personal belongs I'm starting to lug around with my car is increasing as well. Also the construction sites can be rough sometimes, sometimes there gravel, a lot of the other time's it's dirt, and often times those dirt roads are really rough, and uneven; every once in a while I'll scrap up against a really big rock or scrap where there's a dip or hump on the dirt roads(this even applies to gravel as well). Every now and then I gotta go park in the middle of a field of decently high grass or the side of the road. Should a Ridgeline be able to handle the construction work stuff or do I need to look at other trucks? I like the interior of the Ridgeline and heard it's really comfortable to drive and has amazing mpg but I'm not sure if it'll hold up for my work and also been hearing some people say not to use it as a work truck but I'm not 100% sure what to think about it.
Any thoughts on whether I should still pursue the Ridgeline or no?
If a car with a pickup bed for those light hauling needs will suffice, then a Ridgeline will be just fine. In other words, when you think Ridgeline think of the El Camino or Ranchero of the past. It sounds like a dedicated truck will better serve your needs.

Bill
 

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IMO for this application the G1 is cursed by the sloping bed-sides and buttresses that unarguably restrict front-of-bed 'reach-over' access compared to the G2's 'traditional' level bed sides. I would not want that for jobsite use myself, but YMMV.
Take from someone who has used a GenI for constuction duty since they first came out in 2005. . .Sloped bedsides are a non issue for how I use my truck and are a plus for trash and bulk material hauling. My daily use tools fit in the trunk and are hidden form thieves unlike a typical bed mounted toolbox. Larger tools go in the back of the cab or the bed on the way to a jobsite. 4x8 materials lay flat in the bed. I also have a heavy duty roof rack for ladders and long materials, although lighter weight / floppy stuff are easily hauled through the large sliding rear window.

GenII is expensive to be beat up for construction duty. Its bed is wider and longer but shallower (as already discussed) and its trunk is smaller. Rear cab access is significantly more cramped in the GenII than the GenI even with the door checker hack. This is more of a construction use "curse" than any so called issue with too much bed depth. The GenII gets about 2-3 mpg better overall and is a much more car like in the inside / outside experience. It's minivan styling will be a big "hit" at the job site if you care about those types of things. GenI is more trucklike inside and out with its tougher (a bit dorky too) appearance. GenIs that have been properly maintained will go over 300k miles with plenty of first hand accounts on this site. . .GenII?? Honda's build quality does seem to have slipped as of late although there are plenty of happy GenIIers. Transmission and fuel injector issues seem to be at the top of the list for expensive somewhat common GenII issues.
Overall the Ridge has been a perfect match for my dual use needs as both a family AND a tool / material hauler.
Good luck!
 

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Besides all of the above positive notes... the lift up rear seats provide access to a flat floor that holds a ton of crap if needed. I typically kept stuff I used less frequently in the bed's trunk and used the back seat area for everything else. Although I didn't find a full covering weather floor mat, for my purposes, I always left a moving blanket and towels covering the floor. That protected the floor for everything I ever threw in there, and also gave me blankets to wrap stuff into that I wanted to protect.

I think you would be very happy with a 'Ridge for your requirements.
 

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I find it funny that every other truck owner trashes the Ridgeline for not being a truck, and lots of G1 owners trash the G2 for not being as capable and looks :eek:

I find it all a pile of crap, if your needs are a pick up truck to move shit around in the bed (thus the name pick up) on road or gravel roads/ grass the G2 is not only capable but does it very well. I had the 2017 and now the 2020 and have loaded it up with dirt, wood, trees, sheetrock, camping gear, tools of all sorts, moved people's stuff out of their house, large appliances, snow blowers, lawn mowers, construction materials of all sorts, you name it. Never once have I had an issue.

If you don't like the looks, that's fine, but that doesn't speak to it's abilities.

Can a full size truck do more - of course if you want a full size truck.
Do you need a full size, are the trade offs what you want? That can only be answered by the user.

Comparing a Ridge to an El Camino is a bit much :rolleyes::sleep::poop:
 

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I find it funny that every other truck owner trashes the Ridgeline for not being a truck, and lots of G1 owners trash the G2 for not being as capable and looks :eek:

I find it all a pile of crap, if your needs are a pick up truck to move shit around in the bed (thus the name pick up) on road or gravel roads/ grass the G2 is not only capable but does it very well. I had the 2017 and now the 2020 and have loaded it up with dirt, wood, trees, sheetrock, camping gear, tools of all sorts, moved people's stuff out of their house, large appliances, snow blowers, lawn mowers, construction materials of all sorts, you name it. Never once have I had an issue.

If you don't like the looks, that's fine, but that doesn't speak to it's abilities.

Can a full size truck do more - of course if you want a full size truck.
Do you need a full size, are the trade offs what you want? That can only be answered by the user.

Comparing a Ridge to an El Camino is a bit much :rolleyes::sleep::poop:

Your'e lying. The G2 is only capable of getting groceries. It is too pretty to be used like a truck. Don't want to scratch the pretty paint.












/S :p
I wish I could afford one.

"Do you need a full size, are the trade offs what you want? That can only be answered by the user."

Exactly, we can only slightly push them towards the ridge though haha. But it is always hard to recommend it because it is a love hate relationship with the ridge, which I think that speaks for all of us on here.
 

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Exactly, we can only slightly push them towards the ridge though haha. But it is always hard to recommend it because it is a love hate relationship with the ridge, which I think that speaks for all of us on here.
All you have to do is get them to test-drive the different trucks back-to-back, then let them figure out if they'll spend more time inside the cab looking out (driving), or on the outside looking at the truck in their driveway or parking lot.

The Ridgeline would be a much easier sell if the front fascia looked more conventional. I don't particularly care for it, but the rest of the truck more than makes up for the appearance, and I'm not all that vain to begin with anyway. 😁
 

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Comparing a Ridge to an El Camino is a bit much :rolleyes::sleep::poop:
Of course, this is just a personal view point where we own two early 8' bed 70's pickups which serve our "truck" needs, where the Ridgeline has filled in the spot vacated by our El Camino's of the past. :)

Bill
 
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