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I'm not the first ROC member to use either of these products, but I may be one of the first to use the two together.

College Hills Honda makes a simple plug-n-play adapter to add two aftermarket horns without any wire cutting, soldering or additional relay.

https://www.collegehillshonda.com/product/0S03A.html

PIAA Superior Bass Horns produce 115db of loud, old-school sound and only draw 2.7-amps each; well within the 10-amp capability of the G2's OEM horn relay.

PIAA | Automotive Superior Bass Horn (330/400Hz) #85115

https://www.amazon.com/PIAA-85115-Superior-Bass-Horn/dp/B0060ZB43G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523453949&sr=8-1&keywords=piaa+superior

Using the two products together I mounted one of the PIAA horns in the OEM horn location and mounted the other on an unused bracket nearby and connected everything with the College Hills wiring adapter. It takes about 30-minutes to an hour and is a HUGE improvement over the OEM meep-meep horn!

Here are a couple of photos, one of which I've marked to make it easier to visualize the new wires and horns.
 

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Thanks, @coolbob. Parts ordered.

I'm NOT fond of modifying vehicles, but I'm a very "horn-y" person and can no longer live with Honda's inappropriate horn choice. This solution seems simple enough.

Here's a random video I found demonstrating what the PIAA 85115 Super Bass Horns sound like...

 

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Cool job Bob!:smile:

New horns do not sound loud. May be it's because where you stood when you made video or it's my crappy headphone.

How did you install the horn on the right side? I had a hell of a time trying to screw on a relay and ground wire with one hand and gave up in the end.

Edit: just realized that the video was not yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm NOT fond of modifying vehicles, but I'm a very "horn-y" person and can no longer live with Honda's inappropriate horn choice. This solution seems simple enough.
zroger73

I don't mind modifying a vehicle to address a deficiency, but only if I can make the entire modification up to my standards.

The OEM horns are woefully inadequate. I tried another solution, but removed it as soon as I finished the installation for several reasons. (1) I prefer not to have the horns visible through the grill. (2) I am concerned that exposure to the elements (80-mph rain, bugs, heat, etc.) will shorten the lifespan of any horns mounted behind the grill. (3) I prefer not to add an additional horn relay circuit that includes numerous connections and an additional and difficult to access fuse and relay.

Even though I am very pleased with the install, the OCD in me is tempted to encase the horn adapter wires in small gauge wire loom and I am concerned that the horn's push-on connectors may corrode over time, but other than that I feel the upgrade is up to my standards. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
How did you install the horn on the right side? I had a hell of a time trying to screw on a relay and ground wire with one hand and gave up in the end.
JamesW

There is a nice threaded nut welded to the unused bracket, but the threads on the nut are painted over at the factory and thus it's very sung. A ratcheting 10mm box wench or a 1/4"-drive socket wrench are definitely your friend for getting a bolt on that nut. I was tempted to run a tap through the nut threads to clean them up a bit, but managed to get the new bolt in place with a little patience.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
What is actually involved to replace the horns. What needs to be removed in order to gain access, etc. Thanks
The only things you will need to purchase in addition to the PIAA horns and connecter is a pair of 6mm fine-thread bolts about 3/4-inch long, two lock washers and one nut.

Unscrew the four plastic clips (Phillips screwdriver) that hold the air cleaner intake that goes over the radiator on the driver's side. Once the screw portions are removed, pull the clips out of the holes and set them aside. Lift off the upper intake plumbing pieces and set them aside.

Disconnect the battery. Loosen and remove the negative wire first with a 10mm wrench or socket, then repeat with the positive wire. When you reinstall, secure the positive first, then the negative. (this way you won't accidentally short a wrench between the positive terminal and the truck ground)

Loosen the two bolts that hold the battery in place and unhook the battery hold-down hooks. (10mm deep well socket or open end wrench)

Unplug the small electrical connector on the front right of the battery (I think it's a fan to cool the battery). Lift the battery high enough to clear the battery tray and slide the battery over closer to the engine as far as it will go.

This should give you enough room to work.

Unplug the OEM horn and unbolt the horn from the OEM bracket and remove the horn.

Don't mess with the PIAA horn brackets, you risk ruining the horns and they work fine as is.

The PIAA horns come with a pair grounding wires as does the College Hills horn wiring kit. you can use either set as is, but I chose to shorten the wires as they are quite long.

I can't remember which horn went where, they are mirror images of each other so test fit both PIAA horns to the OEM horn bracket to see which one fits best and allows the opening of the horn to point downward the best. There is an aluminum brace that prevents the horn from pointing straight down, but a downward angle is sufficient as the mounting area is well protected from water.

Connect the grounding wire to one of the horn terminals (either terminal is fine) and put the loop end of the wire around the bolt you use to attach the first PIAA horn to the OEM horn bracket with a lock washer and nut. I found that a 10mm open end wrench and a 10mm ratchet box wrench worked better than a socket wrench.

Repeat the process for the second horn threading the bolt into the nut welded to the unused bracket. The nut will have a good bit of paint on the threads and it will be difficult to thread the bolt, you might want to clear the threads with a tap if you have one or at least thread the bolt into place without the horn to clean the threads.

Once both horns are mounted and grounded, simply plug the horn adapter wire into the OEM connector and attach the two wires to the open terminals on both horns.

Give the new horns a test toot and put everything back like you found it. :)
 

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Robert,

Thanks for your quick and detailed response. It looks pretty straight forward and I appreciate you sharing. It looks like another upgrade I need to move forward on.
 

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Can the OEM horn be replaced by a single horn from this or another manufacturer and still get a good tone and volume of sound?
 

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Can the OEM horn be replaced by a single horn from this or another manufacturer and still get a good tone and volume of sound?
You can change the single horn to one with a different pitch, but it'll still have only one "note". There are two types of "horns" typically used on vehicles - one that uses a spiral path (this is the "conventional" type of "horn" that "honks" (more common on larger/domestic vehicles) and one that uses a larger, exposed diaphragm that "meeps" (more common on smaller/import vehicles and motorcycles/scooters). Most vehicles use one or two of one type or the other, but some older Cadillacs and Buicks used four horns that sounded like a train. While a single horn is more than capable of serving its purpose, the sound from a single horn will never be as rich or pleasing as two, three, or four horns. Think about the difference between a solo singer and a duet - the harmonies from two different notes makes a huge difference.
 

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PIAA Superior Bass Horns produce 115db of loud, old-school sound and only draw 2.7-amps each; well within the 10-amp capability of the G2's OEM horn relay.
My horns came in yesterday from Amazon, but who knows when the wiring harness will arrive from College Hills Honda considering the free shipping through USPS. :)

I measured the current draw of the 330 Hz horn at 3.0 amps and the 400 Hz horn at 2.5 amps for a total of 5.5 amps. The 330 Hz horn would sometimes "hum" instead of "honk" during bench-testing using a fully-charged, 12-volt battery. Hopefully, it won't be a problem once its rigidly mounted in the correct orientation, but it has me a little concerned.
 

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You can change the single horn to one with a different pitch, but it'll still have only one "note". There are two types of "horns" typically used on vehicles - one that uses a spiral path (this is the "conventional" type of "horn" that "honks" (more common on larger/domestic vehicles) and one that uses a larger, exposed diaphragm that "meeps" (more common on smaller/import vehicles and motorcycles/scooters). Most vehicles use one or two of one type or the other, but some older Cadillacs and Buicks used four horns that sounded like a train. While a single horn is more than capable of serving its purpose, the sound from a single horn will never be as rich or pleasing as two, three, or four horns. Think about the difference between a solo singer and a duet - the harmonies from two different notes makes a huge difference.
When a barbershop quartet hits certain notes/harmonies, sufficient overtones are created to make a listener think that there are actually five singers. I wonder if one could duplicate such an effect with horns? And if so, how would the Doppler effect affect it?

In addition to frequency, once might also consider the timber (pronounced 'tambor') of the note. Timber is affected by various physical parameters, and is what makes 440hz on a piano string sound different from 440hz on a guitar string, or even 440hz among various guitars or guitar strings, etc. In this case, it would be the overall sound of the frequency based on horn manufacturer and manufacturing design and characteristics, and is largely subjective depending on the listener.

You can listen to different horns on YouTube, but the sound will be affected by how it was recorded, youtube compression, and the end listeners speakers, etc. Or you can go to a good auto shop and hope they have a few different horns on audio display, or listen to friends' aftermarket horns, or go to a custom car show, etc., or just go buy a horn and live with it. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I measured the current draw of the 330 Hz horn at 3.0 amps and the 400 Hz horn at 2.5 amps for a total of 5.5 amps. The 330 Hz horn would sometimes "hum" instead of "honk" during bench-testing using a fully-charged, 12-volt battery. Hopefully, it won't be a problem once its rigidly mounted in the correct orientation, but it has me a little concerned.
College Hills shipped my connector pretty quickly, bet yours shows up any day now.

Before installing my PIAA horns I hooked up a pair of test leads and briefly tested each of my PIAA horns by touching the test leads to the battery terminals. Both horns were very loud.

PIAA says the horns draw 2.7 amps each, the hum along with the 3-amp draw on the 330 Hz horn would have me concerned. Every set of horn instructions I have seen says not to mess with the mounting brackets attached to the horns. Do the nuts attaching the horns to the brackets or adjusting screws show any sign of tampering? Maybe you got a set that were damaged and returned or just factory duds.

I'd go ahead and order another pair from Amazon.
 

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College Hills shipped my connector pretty quickly, bet yours shows up any day now.

Before installing my PIAA horns I hooked up a pair of test leads and briefly tested each of my PIAA horns by touching the test leads to the battery terminals. Both horns were very loud.

PIAA says the horns draw 2.7 amps each, the hum along with the 3-amp draw on the 330 Hz horn would have me concerned. Every set of horn instructions I have seen says not to mess with the mounting brackets attached to the horns. Do the nuts attaching the horns to the brackets or adjusting screws show any sign of tampering? Maybe you got a set that were damaged and returned or just factory duds.

I'd go ahead and order another pair from Amazon.
My harness arrived today. I was expecting a custom-made harness by College Hills Honda using a "genuine Honda OE horn connector" to female push-on terminals. I was a bit surprised to have received a "MADE IN CHINA" wiring harness complete with misspelled words on the packaging.

http://en.osunhorn.com/product_detail/productId=78.html

The horns were in a factory-sealed box with no signs of tampering and no damage to the packaging.

I'll be out of town the next few days, so this might be a project for later in the week. We'll see how long this el-cheapo wiring harness lasts...if I don't change my mind. I much prefer a solution that uses all "Honda" parts.
 

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I did the horn mod last week...
Been a while since I have worked under a hood, and it showed while doing this install, It is a bit tight in there unless you fully remove the battery.
I am much happier with a truck sounding horn.
 

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Even though I am very pleased with the install, the OCD in me is tempted to encase the horn adapter wires in small gauge wire loom and I am concerned that the horn's push-on connectors may corrode over time, but other than that I feel the upgrade is up to my standards. :)
In the old days, I liked to spray the exposed metal electricals with dielectric grease (not silicone). Other solutions are to use black tape (annoying) or "monkey poop" tape (effortlessly conforming and permanently waterproof). The more modern silicon rescue tape (http://www.rescuetape.com/) that acts just like monkey poop would be the way I'd approach this today.

However, after modifying a few vehicles with better horns, corrosion didn't turn out as big a problem as I expected it to be.
 

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Robert,

I did this horn install as per your instructions. Everything went in nice and easy and my new horn sounds great! Thanks for providing clear and easy to follow instructions. I wasn't really interested in the other horn upgrades that utilize custom brackets, especially ones in front of the radiator. I understand why people like those, but I prefer this OEM-style upgrade the best. Thanks again for putting this together.
 
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