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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I am soon getting a 2022 Ridgeline Sport and am researching some overlanding mods.

I was wondering of any issues caused by the skid plates (especially the rear diff skid plate). The front skid plate has cutouts for cooling, but the rear diff skid plate doesn't. Does this cause cooling/overheating issues when under heavy loads (towing or rough terrain)?

Thanks. Sorry if this is answered somewhere else. I'm new to the forum and didn't see this topic anywhere.
 

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We have had no issues with the No-Lo front skid plate creating overheating problem, even with heavy towing, and I doubt there would be any with the rear skid plate. Also the front skid plate has several gouges aquired in the back country proving it's value. Otherwise, I may be talking out of turn here, but what would concern me with the rear skid plate is it's design with that blunt front end clobbering a rock or other obstacle, catching, ripping off and possibly doing more damage than if it was not there?

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Hood Bumper


If I may add a commentary here, yes, the front skid plate has saved our Ridgeline from potentially devastating damage, but the biggest thing we believe we have learned is the the Ridgeline really does not belong in truly rough back country in the first place. Not only have we damaged the skid plate, but there is damage, (luckily minor), along the length of the bottom side where good ol Mother Earth has reached up and touched us underneath. So, if this is where you really want to go, then I would suggest that there are other vehicles out there that would serve you better for this purpose.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@OleSaintNik Welcome to the club!
Thank you!! I'm excited to join the Ridgeline family! I look forward to learning from you all on the forum.

We have had no issues with the No-Lo front skid plate creating overheating problem, even with heavy towing, and I doubt there would be any with the rear skid plate. Also the front skid plate has several gouges aquired in the back country proving it's value. Otherwise, I may be talking out of turn here, but what would concern me with the rear skid plate is it's design with that blunt front end clobbering a rock or other obstacle, catching, ripping off and possibly doing more damage than if it was not there?

Bill
That's a good point, thanks for the response! I'm surprised it doesn't have an angled front like the front skid plate. Are you running only the front skid plate?
 

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Thank you!! I'm excited to join the Ridgeline family! I look forward to learning from you all on the forum.



That's a good point, thanks for the response! I'm surprised it doesn't have an angled front like the front skid plate. Are you running only the front skid plate?
Yes we are operating with the front skid plate only, for the reasons that I have described. I have also added another lil commentary to my post above possibly after you read the post?

Bill
 

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We have had no issues with the No-Lo front skid plate creating overheating problem, even with heavy towing, and I doubt there would be any with the rear skid plate. Also the front skid plate has several gouges aquired in the back country proving it's value. Otherwise, I may be talking out of turn here, but what would concern me with the rear skid plate is it's design with that blunt front end clobbering a rock or other obstacle, catching, ripping off and possibly doing more damage than if it was not there?

View attachment 418190

If I may add a commentary here, yes, the front skid plate has saved our Ridgeline from potentially devastating damage, but the biggest thing we believe we have learned is the the Ridgeline really does not belong in truly rough back country in the first place. Not only have we damaged the skid plate, but there is damage, (luckily minor), along the length of the bottom side where good ol Mother Earth has reached up and touched us underneath. So, if this is where you really want to go, then I would suggest that there are other vehicles out there that would serve you better for this purpose.

Bill
I agree 100%. I went on some fire and hunting trails a few weeks ago and bottomed out more than once on the front skid plate. The trail wasn’t that gnarly, but I was driving pretty fast, and with the shocks getting a workout it did scrape the bottom.

So I would not plan on aggressive offroading with the Ridgeline. What we did while we were in the Black Hills was to rent some RZR ATVs, specifically the Pro XP. Awesome rig with about 170 horses turbocharged DOHC, and AWD. It is a bargain to rent one of these for a day or half a day, vs buying a fullsize truck to go offroading maybe 1-2 times a year. If something breaks unexpectedly, it’s not your problem. Plus many of the most challenging trails were ATV only.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree 100%. I went on some fire and hunting trails a few weeks ago and bottomed out more than once on the front skid plate. The trail wasn’t that gnarly, but I was driving pretty fast, and with the shocks getting a workout it did scrape the bottom.

So I would not plan on aggressive offroading with the Ridgeline. What we did while we were in the Black Hills was to rent some RZR ATVs, specifically the Pro XP. Awesome rig with about 170 horses turbocharged DOHC, and AWD. It is a bargain to rent one of these for a day or half a day, vs buying a fullsize truck to go offroading maybe 1-2 times a year. If something breaks unexpectedly, it’s not your problem. Plus many of the most challenging trails were ATV only.
If I may add a commentary here, yes, the front skid plate has saved our Ridgeline from potentially devastating damage, but the biggest thing we believe we have learned is the the Ridgeline really does not belong in truly rough back country in the first place. Not only have we damaged the skid plate, but there is damage, (luckily minor), along the length of the bottom side where good ol Mother Earth has reached up and touched us underneath. So, if this is where you really want to go, then I would suggest that there are other vehicles out there that would serve you better for this purpose.

Bill
Thank you both for sharing your experiences with the Ridgeline, it's some very valuable info. I don't plan to do any aggressive offroading in the ridgeline, just some occasional overlanding. I know it's not a rock-crawler, so I won't try to tackle any intense obstacles. I mainly just want to be able to go through some reasonably rough trails to get to scenic areas and campsites.

Are either of you running a lift? I was thinking of getting a Traxda lift and some bigger All-Terrain tires.

Thanks
 

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Since the OP is a temperature thread, maybe take some temp readings with a point-n-shoot infrared temp gun before installing skid plate(s) and under same driving conditions (as best you can) after installing skid plate(s) for a comparison, if possible. Some fluid temps (tranny) can easily be monitored under all driving conditions…..unfortunately, rear diff fluid is not one of them, to the best of my knowledge. Temp gun temp comparison may be worth a shot, maybe not. My $25 Harbor Freight temp gun is just as accurate as my $300 Raytek. I do monitor temps but do not off-road so no need for skid plates so I can’t give you an honest temp comparison, with and without plates. Again, give the temp gun some thought.

20 mph may be doomsday (even with skid plates)…..2 mph may be a non-issue. How do you know? It could be very painful/expensive finding out what speed over what terrain exceeded the Ridgeline’s limit…..lift or no lift. Larger diameter tires always place increased load on a drivetrain, as in reducing performance/increasing temps.
 
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Just an interesting lil tid bid where when we probably clobbered the front skid plate the hardest was innocently within a hundred feet or so of the highway. We pulled off the highway on a wide spot simply to give our pup a lil run and didn't see where runoff had eroded a ditch, in which I found rather abruptly. Thank goodness we had the skid plate installed! So the front skid plate can be a good idea even if you don't head into the back country.

Bill
 

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Take a look at this thread.
Running over a deer in the road caused damaged to propeller shaft support.

These two supports hang down and are exposed pretty well. It would be nice to have some protection for them, as well.

 

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Yea, when you look underneath the Ridgeline there several things that can get smacked or snagged where the rear differential may be the least of your worries?

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Since the OP is a temperature thread, maybe take some temp readings with a point-n-shoot infrared temp gun before installing skid plate(s) and under same driving conditions (as best you can) after installing skid plate(s) for a comparison, if possible. Some fluid temps (tranny) can easily be monitored under all driving conditions…..unfortunately, rear diff fluid is not one of them, to the best of my knowledge. Temp gun temp comparison may be worth a shot, maybe not. My $25 Harbor Freight temp gun is just as accurate as my $300 Raytek. I do monitor temps but do not off-road so no need for skid plates so I can’t give you an honest temp comparison, with and without plates. Again, give the temp gun some thought.

20 mph may be doomsday (even with skid plates)…..2 mph may be a non-issue. How do you know? It could be very painful/expensive finding out what speed over what terrain exceeded the Ridgeline’s limit…..lift or no lift. Larger diameter tires always place increased load on a drivetrain, as in reducing performance/increasing temps.
Thank you, that's some very helpful information. If I end up doing that test, I'll post the results here, so the community can have a reference for this topic. However, it may be a little while until then because the truck isn't getting delivered until November, we have a baby coming in December, etc...

You might check this YouTuber out. Probably can answer a lot of your questions. He Overlands in a Passport.
Thanks! I have been watching his channel a lot lately, and it is very helpful! I may send him a few messages with specific questions. He definitely shows that extreme overlanding is possible with this platform, with the proper mods and driver skill.

Just an interesting lil tid bid where when we probably clobbered the front skid plate the hardest was innocently within a hundred feet or so of the highway. We pulled off the highway on a wide spot simply to give our pup a lil run and didn't see where runoff had eroded a ditch, in which I found rather abruptly. Thank goodness we had the skid plate installed! So the front skid plate can be a good idea even if you don't head into the back country.

Bill
That is so true. The stuff that you don't see is usually what will get you the worst. That does further encourage me to get a lift, bigger tires, and skid plates. Even if I don't do any extreme offroading, it will help give peace of mind!

Take a look at this thread.
Running over a deer in the road caused damaged to propeller shaft support.

These two supports hang down and are exposed pretty well. It would be nice to have some protection for them, as well.

Ouch. That is a very helpful thread, thanks for linking it! That definitely makes me want a lift/tires/skid plates even more now! I live in the country, so deer carcasses are definitely a risk for me.
 

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That is so true. The stuff that you don't see is usually what will get you the worst. That does further encourage me to get a lift, bigger tires, and skid plates. Even if I don't do any extreme offroading, it will help give peace of mind!
I just need to ask, why are you intent on purchasing a Ridgeline, modifying it at an additional expense and possibly negating some of it's most appealing attributes, namely it's superb ride, handling and dependability, when you can simply purchase a vehicle right off the show room floor already better designed for this type of duty at overall less expense?

Bill
 

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Thank you, that's some very helpful information. If I end up doing that test, I'll post the results here, so the community can have a reference for this topic. However, it may be a little while until then because the truck isn't getting delivered until November, we have a baby coming in December, etc...........
The only fluid temp I can think of that will be very close to the same, all the time, winter vs summer, is engine coolant temp.
 

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With a new baby coming you will have neither the time or energy to make “upgrades” or go off-roading and still be a responsible parent and partner.
That pretty much nails it.👌 Raising them so that they don't become old babies is a tough job, as in you gotta be there with/for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I just need to ask, why are you intent on purchasing a Ridgeline, modifying it at an additional expense and possibly negating some of it's most appealing attributes, namely it's superb ride, handling and dependability, when you can simply purchase a vehicle right off the show room floor already better designed for this type of duty at overall less expense?

Bill
Because 99.9% of the time, I will be driving on the road doing general commuting stuff. From what I've heard, the ride quality and handling isn't affected very much by the lifts/skids/tires. Also, I don't see how those mods would affect dependability.

With a new baby coming you will have neither the time or energy to make “upgrades” or go off-roading and still be a responsible parent and partner.
That pretty much nails it.👌 Raising them so that they don't become old babies is a tough job, as in you gotta be there with/for them.
Thanks, but I didn't come to this forum for parenting advice, and I don't need you telling me what I do and don't have time for in my personal life. My family comes first in my priorities list, and having a hobby doesn't mean that I can't spend time with them and be a good parent and partner. My wife and I both decided on the Ridgeline together, and we anticipate it being a great family vehicle. If we go camping, it will be as a family activity. I don't need to justify my decisions to any of you, so I'd appreciate it if we can keep this thread on its intended topic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Getting advice you don’t want to hear is the downside of posting personal information on a public forum and asking for advice.
I didn't ask for advice on personal matters, I asked for advice on aftermarket mods for the Ridgeline. The only reason I even mentioned having a baby was because I didn't want people expecting me to report temperature data immediately, if at all. I thought the community here would be friendly and mature enough to handle a small comment about my personal life without jumping on me. Guess I was wrong.
 
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