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Unfortunately I do not still have it. I should have taken pictures but I've seen many references to it only happening to 06-08.

Cheers!


Here are some pics from my '09' with 123,000 miles. Sorry they're not the clearest but you can see there is no excessive corrosion. Fittings were tight and fully seated. There is something kind of "chalky" at the inside of the threads - some type of sealant? It scrapes right off.

If I'd have known how well everything looked, I wouldn't have touched the radiator at all, just changed the coolant.
fitting.JPG
fitting1.JPG
fitting2.JPG
fitting4.JPG
 

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Hey jakeman,

Same here. Should have left it alone. But it was inexpensive for the Denso replacement. C'est La vie!
 

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Typical ATF temperature is recommended to be between 160F and 200F, depending on the system's design requirements. I have seen my ATF temps anywhere between 140F to 195F, in the G1.

The video is 'stump dumb'. :)




It is considered to be. The heat cycle does wear that exchanger out.



The system is designed with same operating parameters, despite the outside temp. Technically, your coolant temp, oil temp, and ATF temp is not changed much, as they are directly dependent on the combustion within the cylinders and they are not changing much. Even though other items such as fuel and ignition timing, are affected by the IAT on typical use.
Can you share your observed TFTs when ambient temps are cool/cold?

Everything under the hood is exposed to heat cycles.....does everything “wear” in 8-10 years?

I observe CT1 (t-stat controlled) is the only one of the three (CT1, CT2, TFT) monitored fluid temps that will remain in a very narrow range shortly after engine start-up. TFT is very slow to rise, as I have stated many times, from a cold start, in cool/cold ambient temps and that does not seem to be a concern of auto manufacturers. CT2 can easily be 100*+ from CT1. So, if CT2 is well below CT1, TFT is not being “warmed” by the cooler in the cold tank of the radiator. Again, low TFT does not seem to be a concern to auto manufacturers.
 

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Those pics above are what I would expect to see in a well maintained cooling system. Externally, road salt appears to be a non-issue.....internally, looks like the tranny fluid is doing its job to prevent corrosion.
 

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2010 RT - Bali Blue
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Can you share your observed TFTs when ambient temps are cool/cold?
Below are some of the data points. Some of the high Coolant temps in OCT is when I was doing some of the testing with the truck that was taxing on the engine and the ATF stays rather steady for the ambient temp.

Another good example is row two with the IAT at 91.4F. I was a slow speed crawl in heavy traffic for about 20 minutes and you can see that though the ambient temp was in the low 70s, the inadequate airflow can push the ATF towards 200F easy.

IAT (F)ATF (F)Coolant (F)DateAmbient (F)
113.00141.80176.00JUN101.00
91.40195.80201.20JUN73.00
51.80159.80174.20JAN43.00
44.60134.60176.00JAN41.00
41.00141.80172.40JANNA
44.60127.40174.20JANNA
53.60136.40172.40DECNA
66.20132.80177.80DECNA
84.20156.20197.60OCTNA
71.60161.60186.80OCTNA
66.20167.00174.20OCTNA
69.80165.20190.40OCTNA

I live in Central NJ so you can assume the temperatures in OCT, DEC and JAN in my area.
 

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Yep, drop that ambient temp and TFT basically drops as well. Coolant temp, for the most part and as expected, runs a more narrow range, about the same all year. I don't think auto manufacturers are concerned with low TFT. Our G2 has what Honda calls a tranny "warmer" (oh no, I shouldn't have used the word "warmer", oops there I said it again) on top of the tranny. I see NO evidence that it "warms" TF. Driving does warm TF

Bottom line is, if EC in the cold rad tank has a higher temp than the TF, the TF will be warmed......if EC in the cold rad tank has a lower temp than the TF, the TF will be cooled.
 

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Yep, drop that ambient temp and TFT basically drops as well. Coolant temp, for the most part and as expected, runs a more narrow range, about the same all year. I don't think auto manufacturers are concerned with low TFT. Our G2 has what Honda calls a tranny "warmer" (oh no, I shouldn't have used the word "warmer", oops there I said it again) on top of the tranny. I see NO evidence that it "warms" TF. Driving does warm TF

Bottom line is, if EC in the cold rad tank has a higher temp than the TF, the TF will be warmed......if EC in the cold rad tank has a lower temp than the TF, the TF will be cooled.

I was able to dig through my folders and filled in the ambient temps for the dates I tested. Below is the table, sorted by ascending order of the Ambient temp.

Dropping the Ambient temp, not always provided a lower ATF temp.

IAT (F)ATF (F)Coolant (F)DateAmbient (F)
41.00141.80172.40JAN41.00
44.60127.40174.20JAN41.00
44.60134.60176.00JAN41.00
51.80159.80174.20JAN43.00
66.20132.80177.80DEC55.00
66.20167.00174.20OCT59.00
71.60161.60186.80OCT59.00
69.80165.20190.40OCT59.00
84.20156.20197.60OCT59.00
91.40195.80201.20JUN73.00
113.00141.80176.00JUN101.00
53.60136.40172.40DECNA


I know you have engaged in conversations outside of this thread about ATF, coolant and Ambient temps, when discussing the effectiveness of the 'pre-warmer' in the G2.
I am not certain where the Coolant temp is recorded in the G1 on the TorquePro App.
In the G2, the 'pre warmer' gets its coolant straight from the Thermostat right? If that is the case, the coolant will always be warm than the coolant that is exiting the radiator.

However, your statement is correct as it is basic thermo dynamics; if the EC (engine coolant) is higher than the TF (trans fluid), then the TF gets warmer. if the EC is lower than the TF, then the TF gets cooler.
 

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I was able to dig through my folders and filled in the ambient temps for the dates I tested. Below is the table, sorted by ascending order of the Ambient temp.

Dropping the Ambient temp, not always provided a lower ATF temp.

IAT (F)ATF (F)Coolant (F)DateAmbient (F)
41.00141.80172.40JAN41.00
44.60127.40174.20JAN41.00
44.60134.60176.00JAN41.00
51.80159.80174.20JAN43.00
66.20132.80177.80DEC55.00
66.20167.00174.20OCT59.00
71.60161.60186.80OCT59.00
69.80165.20190.40OCT59.00
84.20156.20197.60OCT59.00
91.40195.80201.20JUN73.00
113.00141.80176.00JUN101.00
53.60136.40172.40DECNA


I know you have engaged in conversations outside of this thread about ATF, coolant and Ambient temps, when discussing the effectiveness of the 'pre-warmer' in the G2.
I am not certain where the Coolant temp is recorded in the G1 on the TorquePro App.
In the G2, the 'pre warmer' gets its coolant straight from the Thermostat right? If that is the case, the coolant will always be warm than the coolant that is exiting the radiator.

However, your statement is correct as it is basic thermo dynamics; if the EC (engine coolant) is higher than the TF (trans fluid), then the TF gets warmer. if the EC is lower than the TF, then the TF gets cooler.
I can’t find the coolant flow diagram that has been post here before, but the diagram indicated NO coolant flow thru the “warmer” when the t-stat is closed. That would explain why the tranny is very slow to warm up.....like most other auto trannys I’ve monitored.

Usually engine coolant sensors are located in, or near, a head.
 
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