Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
living here in ny waiting for the big snowstorm to hit sometime this winter. i would like to know what people use to remove the snow from their vehicles. i had scratched the clear coat using a snow brush too aggressively and dont want to mess up my black paint. so lets hear your choices and yes i do realize not everyone gets snow and some of us garage our trucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,311 Posts
I'd use a hair dryer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
The main thing I do is wax the entire truck as close to winter as possible while still above freezing. This helps the snow slide off easier. I use an extendable snow brush and push the snow from one side to the other. Use a light pressure as not to scratch the paint. Remember , you don't want scrub the thing....just remove most of the snow, not all of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,967 Posts
If I am not in it, it stays in the garage. So far no snow this year, a little unusual to be well into January and only a couple of flurries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
I use one of these... It's foam molded around a plastic core. I always replace the aluminum adjustable handle that invariable fails with a wooden broom handle cut down to about 4 - 5 feet.

There are several brands on the market. I've had my 'sno-brum' brand one for years and it works great to push or pull snow be it light/fluffy or wet/heavy.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
781 Posts
I use one of these... It's foam molded around a plastic core. I always replace the aluminum adjustable handle that invariable fails with a wooden broom handle cut down to about 4 - 5 feet.

There are several brands on the market. I've had my 'sno-brum' brand one for years and it works great to push or pull snow be it light/fluffy or wet/heavy.
This guy is from Alaska! He must know what he's talking about!:act030:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
Some of my detailing colleagues that live in snowy climates say it's best to leave a very thin layer on as to not touch the paint, but get the bulk of it off using a brush of some nature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
I use a car wash brush and only use it on the RL.Its Softer then my snow brushes.For my 2000 corolla I just use a plastic shovel and snow brush.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
50 Posts
Here in the province of Ontario the law states all the windows and large surfaces should be cleared of snow and ice. The storms that provdes
moisture which in turn freezes followed by snow can be a pain. If the truck is outside, and i have an early morning run I plug in the block heater the night before. Had one in my earler Civics and now in the 2011 Ridgeline. Come out in the early morning, thef ront bonnet is clear of precipitation, the rest of the truck is warm so the snow brush (with a wood handle, not plastic) simply pushes the snow off. Clear the top roof if you can as well. Undo the outside electrical plug and start the truck. You should be good to go in five minutes or less. Oh, and fill the windscreen washer up to the top, every day!
I make a point of using a spray wash with cold water once a week to clean all the crap out from under the wheel arches, as well as the cargo deck area. Winter and the chemicals of same can be disastrous to the finish of your Ridgeline. I usually get 15 years or more from my vehicles; oil underspray in the fall, keep it washed and regular oil and filter changes, more often than the book and computer calls for.Most engine oils are dead by the time the 40 percent mark appears.
That truck cost a pretty penny; you want to keep the Ridgeline clean and good looking
when you trade it in ten or 15 years. It's your money!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
I still use an older foam/rubber snow broom, similar to the above Snow Brum. It was sold here in Canada at the Canadian Tire store for a while, but I guess they didn't sell enough to continue to stock it.

Anyway, it's great! After most snowfalls, I can clear off the Ridgeline in less than two minutes, including the roof and tonneau cover. I only use my conventional snow brush/scraper when there is ice or crusty snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Some of my detailing colleagues that live in snowy climates say it's best to leave a very thin layer on as to not touch the paint, but get the bulk of it off using a brush of some nature.
You got it right. This is what I do. I don't want anything touching my paint. If there is a ton of snow, I take the bulk off and leave the rest to blow off on the drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
I'll second the soft bristle, long handled car washing brush. It is only used for clearing from my vehicles. I actually just picked up a replacement today as the one I've used for the last 7 years is falling apart. New brush was $15 at Tractor Supply Depot. To clear the bed I use a plastic snow shovel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,014 Posts
I've never used anything but a regular snow brush/ scraper combo about 18" long that you can buy anywhere. Lots of snow, I use a regular broom from my garage. I think you can get a little carried away with this. A regular brush works just fine and work hurt anything unless you get too aggressive

New car lots where we live brush off their cars much more crudely than most of us would do our own. Car salesmen don't like this part of the job and get it done as fast as they can. I don't know anyone not buying a new car because of scratches from brushing them off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
I've never used anything but a regular snow brush/ scraper combo about 18" long that you can buy anywhere. Lots of snow, I use a regular broom from my garage. I think you can get a little carried away with this. A regular brush works just fine and work hurt anything unless you get too aggressive

New car lots where we live brush off their cars much more crudely than most of us would do our own. Car salesmen don't like this part of the job and get it done as fast as they can. I don't know anyone not buying a new car because of scratches from brushing them off.
Most people's paint is swirled to hell and they don't know the difference. My paint is near perfect and swirl free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,014 Posts
Most people's paint is swirled to hell and they don't know the difference. My paint is near perfect and swirl free.
I'm no stranger to taking care of cars, but I wasn't aware that gently brushing snow off a vehicle created swirls? ...nor was I aware that Honda RLs came with near perfect paint ;)

As for leaving a thin layer of snow on the entire vehicle so as not to touch the paint...that's a different world from my snow world. The only way a thin layer will be there is if there was freezing rain and snow....or the hood iced up a bit from the engine heat when it was last shut off and it snowed. If that's the case, you certainly don't want to chip that coating off. The engine will typically melt it when it gets run again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
I'm no stranger to taking care of cars, but I wasn't aware that gently brushing snow off a vehicle created swirls? ...nor was I aware that Honda RLs came with near perfect paint ;)

As for leaving a thin layer of snow on the entire vehicle so as not to touch the paint...that's a different world from my snow world. The only way a thin layer will be there is if there was freezing rain and snow....or the hood iced up a bit from the engine heat when it was last shut off and it snowed. If that's the case, you certainly don't want to chip that coating off. The engine will typically melt it when it gets run again.
It creates RIDS, but was saying people don't know what they're looking at.

I'm sure my RL paint didn't come perfect, but I've made the paint that way. ;) No RIDS or swirls in my paint. :)

You could start higher from the paint with the brush as to not touch the vehicle. That should still leave a layer of snow. If it manages to come off without touching it, great.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top