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Yes... is there a reason not to?

Edit: To be clear, I can see why you'd want a genuine breaker bar for busting apart something that is seized and rusted but we're talking about a bolt that shouldn't require any more oomph than you put in it to tighten a lug nut. If there's something fundamentally wrong with that then I've been doing it wrong for 30 years - albeit with the same torque wrench.
You've been using the wrong tools 30 years. A torque wrench is neither a breaker bar nor a ratchet handle.

That rounded out drain plug is just the inevitable catching up with you. As stated, get your wrench recalibrated and also really consider what you do about the differential fluid change. It's probably not an expensive mistake yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Your torque wrench is not a blunt instrument. Use a breaker bar for a breaker bar.

Now go out and get your torque wrench recalibrated.
A few important things to remember about torque wrenches:

1. Never use a torque wrench as a breaker bar in either direction. Applying force beyond its torque setting can cause a loss of calibration or permanent damage.

2. Never use a torque wrench to loosen a right-handed fastener or tighten a left-handed fastener unless it is specifically designed for bi-directional use. Some torque wrenches are made only for tightening right-handed fasteners and will be damaged if used in the opposite direction.

3. Always set the torque setting back to zero after use. Otherwise, the spring can set causing it to lose calibration.
Some habits formed while young and stupid persist well into adulthood, it would seem. Time to calibrate my torque wrench and buy a breaker bar :)

You've been using the wrong tools 30 years. A torque wrench is neither a breaker bar nor a ratchet handle.

That rounded out drain plug is just the inevitable catching up with you. As stated, get your wrench recalibrated and also really consider what you do about the differential fluid change. It's probably not an expensive mistake yet.
Yes, lesson learned - and we're moving very slowly here.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
The drain plug hole measures 0.379, my breaker bar measures 0.374, it fits snug. also it goes in about 0.400 deep
So that seems to answer the 3/8 vs. 10mm question, which is too bad because that 10mm socket adapter looked like it would do the job.

For me, the good news here is the 0.400 inch depth which is way deeper than I was getting. The rounding off of the interior of the bolt is only 0.1 to 0.2 inches deep, so I have some intact bolt geometry to work with, though at this point I definitely want something that's fully square as deep as possible.
 

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So that seems to answer the 3/8 vs. 10mm question, which is too bad because that 10mm socket adapter looked like it would do the job.

For me, the good news here is the 0.400 inch depth which is way deeper than I was getting. The rounding off of the interior of the bolt is only 0.1 to 0.2 inches deep, so I have some intact bolt geometry to work with, though at this point I definitely want something that's fully square as deep as possible.
I wonder too if you don’t have some dirt in the hole. I would pick at it with something sharp and see if you really are down to bare metal deep in the hole.
 

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You know people can get as mad as they want about no volume knob or the curvy front grill and I don't really care but stuff like this gives me pause.

Using a drain plug with a 4 face interface seems like someone in the engineering group either trying to hard or not hard enough. 6 face metric is pretty easy to deal with for removal with just a common wrench and easy to find that fitting for your torque wrench to reinstall.
 

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Make sure the hole is clear of corrosion. Scrape it out with a flat head screwdriver or something. Buy a short 3/8 extension (impact ready if you are going to use an impact wrench on it.) Grind the the tip flat of you are concerned (since you already messed up some of the socket) but that is not normally necessary. Tap the extension into hole with a hammer first. Cross your fingers and keep the extension straight in the socket while you turn it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Problem Solved - I cracked that nut!

Sorry, couldn't help myself.

Taking all the good advice from this forum into account, realizing that any solution involving welding or a trip to the dealer was going to be a last resort, and asserting the primary corollary of DIY which holds that any potential challenge presents an opportunity to buy new tools, I managed to save my own bacon with the following actions:

Found a 3/8 in - drive breaker bar at local hardware store. It was a tiny little thing but it's kind of tight quarters under the back of the truck and thought it would be worth a try. It fit in the socket better than my original adapter, and hammering it in seated it further, though it still felt like it wasn't completely in there. I did tap the handle of the breaker bar lightly and repeatedly with a hammer, hoping to start breaking the seal. If there was any movement it wasn't visually apparent.

So, needing to move on to Dad taxi duty, I finished off with a vigorous wire brush cleaning out around the plug, followed with copious amounts of WD-40.

The way back home took me right by an Advance Auto, which had an impact socket adapter that was a lot more squared-off than what I had been working with previously. While I was at it I picked up a nice 1/2 in - drive breaker bar that will see future duty relieving lug nuts.
new socket adapter crop.jpg

I hadn't been home two minutes before getting under the truck - the socket was a perfect fit - much better than either my old socket adapter or the 3/8 in-drive breaker bar. This adapter really felt completely seated ... so with a prayer to the DIY gods I put some muscle in to the breaker bar ... which was rewarded with a huge snap and all the resistance going out ... I just about shat myself thinking I'd snapped off the nut or something but I reached in and was able to spin the plug in and out by hand - phew!!!

Will be waiting for daylight before completing the fluid change, and possibly another adventure with the drain plug, but I'm equipped this time.

Thanks all for pitching in with the good advice and moral support, was much appreciated during my "tragedy narrowly averted". (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #33
This is too little too late but for future reference:
I did see a link to that part upthread. It makes sense that a Honda plug would be metric but from the measurements cited by another member it sounded like 10mm was going to be too big? My foray into the Honda SIS didn't reveal a proper socket size but if this is indeed the correct one I'm not opposed to purchasing this for the sake of having the right tool for the job, especially since I'm going to be buying replacement plugs. It's still in my Amazon cart.
 

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Congratulations on getting that nut out! It must have been a HUGE relief and joy. I have been silently following your story and crossing fingers along with you, and now, happy with you! Thank you for sharing your experience. Something we can all relate to ;)
 

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Thinking that 3/8 drain plug may be buggered up, you might want to replace it with a new one while you have it out. Along with a new sealing washer while you're at it.

In the early days of the G1 Ridgeline, I remember many posts about the factory gorilla tightening the drain bolts on the Ridgeline... rear diff, tranny, etc. That crack and break free experience is common.

I typically do a tire rotation and brake pad/guide pin check every OCI, so I always put my Ridgeline up on 4 jackstands... which makes it easier to get to all the drain plugs and gives more room to work with breaker bars.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Thinking that 3/8 drain plug may be buggered up
Oh, without a doubt. I have a replacement fill and drain plug on order and will be waiting to complete the rear diff fluid change until I have those in hand (already have the sealing washers).


In the early days of the G1 Ridgeline, I remember many posts about the factory gorilla tightening the drain bolts on the Ridgeline... rear diff, tranny, etc. That crack and break free experience is common.
I have no idea what it was like out of the factory since I had the dealer do the first rear diff fluid change at around 15k. But my experience has been that the dealer service dept habitually over-tightens bolts like this. I had a similar thing happen to an oil drain plug on our '05 Ody - there was a time that I would take it in for the B service intervals where they do all the checks, rotate tires, and so forth, but I would do the intermediate oil changes myself. Every time I would go to drain the oil the plug was just insane tight. I think they have some guys in the back that just put an impact wrench to everything and call it a day.

I typically do a tire rotation and brake pad/guide pin check every OCI, so I always put my Ridgeline up on 4 jackstands... which makes it easier to get to all the drain plugs and gives more room to work with breaker bars.
I'm probably going to do something similar, given the propensity for Honda OEM discs getting warpy I've replaced the discs at the same time the factory pads needed changing on all my prior vehicles. Honda must have fixed something in recent years because both my Ridgeline and our '17 Ody have done much better in terms of the rotors not going to hell - the Odyssey is a lease so I'm not going to bother with that but I might go ahead and take the opportunity to make the upgrade anyway on the Ridgeline while I'm doing the rotation.
 

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Apply lube to the new sealing washer. Always be sure any wrench has a full, complete purchase.
 

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The specified torque value is based on the use of a new, dry washer. Applying the same amount of torque to something that's not intended to be installed dry can result in over tightening and possible damage.
Great point. We had that specific issue when my son and I were installing a gas tube on a rifle. No lube required.
 
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