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So, hoping to go the DIY route with my second rear diff fluid change. I have an adapter to take my 1/2" torque wrench socket down to a 3/8", but it does not appear to want to fully seat in the fill plug for the rear diff. I thought I had it in there as far as it would go and got about 1/8 turn before it torqued out, deforming the fill plug a bit in the process (Pic #1). Looking at the socket adapter (Pic #2) the way it's manufactured the ends are rounded off so hard it doesn't look like it's made for this thing in the first place, which makes me wonder if there's a different adapter or tool I should be using.

Any suggestions? Or should I just take it to the dealer and tell them to install a new plug before I make it any worse?


Pic #1 - fill plug
View attachment 405631

Pic #2 - socket adapter
View attachment 405632
As a retired Honda mechanic I always smacked the fill plug with the extension and hammer and the fill and drain plug will be loose.
 

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Agreed!! or cut\grind the tip of your adapted to square up the end.




They sell square head adaptor that sit flush. Mine is from autozone from a few years ago.
 

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There is a tool to remove this plug, and it is metric, after you get the tool you will have to tap it into the Deformed plug and it should be easy to remove
 

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Get 1/2" breaker bar. Spray bolt with PB penetrator. Place wrench, lay on your back and use your foot to stomp/press. Otherwise it ain't happening or you will bust your knuckles. Works everytime.
 

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As a retired Honda mechanic I always smacked the fill plug with the extension and hammer and the fill and drain plug will be loose.
Maybe that is a trick of the trade, but upon successfully performing countless center transfer case and rear differential fluid changes on my G1, I have not encountered a situation where I had to whip out my hammer. Rubber mallet I can imagine, but a hammer?

What other tricks did you guys use to get things done?
 

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Get 1/2" breaker bar. Spray bolt with PB penetrator. Place wrench, lay on your back and use your foot to stomp/press. Otherwise it ain't happening or you will bust your knuckles. Works everytime.
1/2” breaker bar doesn’t fit inside the plug ....he was using 1/2 ratchet (torque wrench) with a 3/8” extension.
 

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There is a tool to remove this plug, and it is metric, after you get the tool you will have to tap it into the Deformed plug and it should be easy to remove
More detail Information on this proper metric tool would be VERY helpful. Links or pictures even better.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Agreed!! or cut\grind the tip of your adapted to square up the end.
Yeah, that was going to be the next step. That or taking a hex head steel bolt that I could drive with a normal socket and grinding down the threaded portion to a 3/8" square. But fortunately it never got to that point.
 

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@ModernViking
I looked all over the web and couldn't find a 3/8 drive with the square profile either...
Amazon has some:
 

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Breakaway torque or the torque needed to loosen that plug can easily be 2-4 times the tightening torque spec.

Corrosion between dissimilar metals steel plug and aluminum case creates nature’s LOCTITE.
Then add the stiction and friction adds to that loosening torque.
Stiction is the reason an oil filter appears to be too tight, as the filter gasket can stick to the filter and block.

Another plug that can appear to very very tight ( for the same reasons) is the transmission fill plug on the top of the transmission .
 

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That factory gorilla really just used factory torque specs. I found that when I torque those drain and fill bolts to the factory spec, I have the same crack and break free experience every time. So I think the gorilla really gets a bum rap. ;)
 

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The specified torque value is based on the use of a new, dry washer. Applying the same amount of torque to something that's intended to be installed dry can result in over tightening and possible damage.
Then we disagree.
 

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McMaster-Carr shows an example of a square 1/2 - 3/8 in adapter on this page under "Impact Square Drive Size Adapters":


They're pricey, but now we know to search for adapters for impact drivers.
 

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Then we disagree.
Where lubricant is required before tightening, it is specified in the service information.

For example, you DO lubricate the o-ring on an engine oil filter or the cylinder head bolt threads and heads with clean engine oil before tightening to the specified torque value, but you do NOT lubricate lug nuts.

The 35 lb-ft torque specification for the iVTM-4 unit's drain and fill plugs is based on the use of new sealing washers without lubrication. Lubricating the plug reduces friction which results in higher clamping forces at the same torque value which can damage threads or fatigue the components. Will it in this application? Perhaps not or perhaps not immediately, but it's best to follow the manufacturer's instructions to minimize the potential for damage and/or leaks.
 

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Where lubricant is required before tightening, it is specified in the service information.

For example, you DO lubricate the o-ring on an engine oil filter or the cylinder head bolt threads and heads with clean engine oil before tightening to the specified torque value, but you do NOT lubricate lug nuts.

The 35 lb-ft torque specification for the iVTM-4 unit's drain and fill plugs is based on the use of new sealing washers without lubrication. Lubricating the plug reduces friction which results in higher clamping forces at the same torque value which can damage threads or fatigue the components. Will it in this application? Perhaps not or perhaps not immediately, but it's best to follow the manufacturer's instructions to minimize the potential for damage and/or leaks.
One area that's never been clarified (to the best of my recollection) is spark plugs. Anti-seize or not? The spark plug mfg says there's a special coating on the plugs and not to use AS. Honda says to use AS on spark plugs and provides the torque value.

I conclude that a small amount of AS should be used on spark plugs since Honda specifies the torque value and also specifies to use AS. That seems a logical conclusion to me.
 
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