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One area that's never been clarified (to the best of my recollection) is spark plugs. Anti-seize or not? The spark plug mfg says there's a special coating on the plugs and not to use AS. Honda says to use AS on spark plugs and provides the torque value.

I conclude that a small amount of AS should be used on spark plugs since Honda specifies the torque value and also specifies to use AS. That seems a logical conclusion to me.
Does the plug manufacturer specify a torque value? If so, is it the same as Honda's (16 lb-ft)?

EDIT: According to a company who sells NGK spark plugs, the torque specs are 10.8-14.5 lb-ft and they feature a "trivalent metal plating [which] provides superior anti-corrosion and anti-seizing properties". Curiously, I can't find any information on this plug directly from NGK.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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Does the plug manufacturer specify a torque value? If so, is it the same as Honda's (16 lb-ft)?

EDIT: According to a company who sells NGK spark plugs, the torque specs are 10.8-14.5 lb-ft and they feature a "trivalent metal plating [which] provides superior anti-corrosion and anti-seizing properties". Curiously, I can't find any information on this plug directly from NGK.
I found this info in my collection but am not sure exactly where it came from:
405852


405853
 

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Since Honda specifies 13 lb-ft torque for the spark plugs, maybe that corresponds to some dry torque value in that chart above.
 

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Then we disagree.
You might want to reconsider your thinking on this. See the continued discussion above.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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Sure is! I didn't realize spark plugs were one of the changes for 2009. Honda failed to list that in the "50 changes to the 2009 Ridgeline". ;)
I bet @McChizzle knew it though!
 
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16 lb-ft 2009-2020. Is 2006-2008 different, perhaps?
I wonder if this change was because of the cases where the spark plug come loose and blew out on the early 1st gen engines
 

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So, hoping to go the DIY route with my second rear diff fluid change. I have an adapter to take my 1/2" torque wrench socket down to a 3/8", but it does not appear to want to fully seat in the fill plug for the rear diff. I thought I had it in there as far as it would go and got about 1/8 turn before it torqued out, deforming the fill plug a bit in the process (Pic #1). Looking at the socket adapter (Pic #2) the way it's manufactured the ends are rounded off so hard it doesn't look like it's made for this thing in the first place, which makes me wonder if there's a different adapter or tool I should be using.

Any suggestions? Or should I just take it to the dealer and tell them to install a new plug before I make it any worse?


Pic #1 - fill plug
View attachment 405631

Pic #2 - socket adapter
View attachment 405632
Just curious on how that damage was caused. When you attempted to loosen the fill plug did you just pull on the end of the handle? On any bolt that I believe will be tight, I use my left hand to put some pressure on the head of the ratchet so that the socket or in this case end of a 3/8 extension doesn't slip off and crank with my right hand. I do the same when tightening the bolt or plug in this case. I've used an extendable 3/8 inch ratchet from harbor freight to crack loose these plugs on rear diff, front transfer case unit and transmission plugs.
 

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Amazon has some:
Yes, I had seen those too...I should have said I couldn't find one individually available at a reasonable cost.
 

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I've found using an impact rated 3/8 extension (just a Pittsburgh aka Harbor Fgt) and a short breaker bar will loosen the rear diff plugs without issue...

The biggest rear diff issue is that Honda's 1.92 qt fill spec is not accurate. 2.0 qts or even 2.1 when you do the air bleed procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
Just curious on how that damage was caused. When you attempted to loosen the fill plug did you just pull on the end of the handle? On any bolt that I believe will be tight, I use my left hand to put some pressure on the head of the ratchet so that the socket or in this case end of a 3/8 extension doesn't slip off and crank with my right hand. I do the same when tightening the bolt or plug in this case. I've used an extendable 3/8 inch ratchet from harbor freight to crack loose these plugs on rear diff, front transfer case unit and transmission plugs.
Basically I didn't have the 3/8" drive end seated entirely in the bolt, and even a light twist was enough to get it to cam out and cause it to deform the bolt. Might have been OK if I'd tried hammering it in to get it fully seated first. Tough to get a good handle on the center of rotation like you mention, given how one accesses the bolt. I was fine with the more squared-off adapter, even without manually bracing the extension.
 

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I've found using an impact rated 3/8 extension (just a Pittsburgh aka Harbor Fgt) and a short breaker bar will loosen the rear diff plugs without issue...

The biggest rear diff issue is that Honda's 1.92 qt fill spec is not accurate. 2.0 qts or even 2.1 when you do the air bleed procedure.
It seems odd that the manual says 1.92 qt. My dealer parts guy told me the same, that the mechanics use a little over 2qt. I just figured they took the third qt. home for their own vehicles, Ha!
Yeah, but what do I know? I’m just planning to do my first fluid change at 11000 miles, as the minder is giving me A16 code.
 

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Add me to the list of people who have just changed the rear diff fluid, and it definitely took 2 qts. + a little bit.
 

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It seems odd that the manual says 1.92 qt. My dealer parts guy told me the same, that the mechanics use a little over 2qt. I just figured they took the third qt. home for their own vehicles, Ha!
Yeah, but what do I know? I’m just planning to do my first fluid change at 11000 miles, as the minder is giving me A16 code.
Mine came up early as no road trips with the Covid...a little under 11k miles. Took about 2.2 quarts and I did a very thorough drain on a very level surface. I did torque back to spec (35 ft-lbs) but not issues with removal. I use a quart bottle fluid pump that I use for lower unit fills on the boat as well.

I've done so many of these drain and fills on various Hondas and others I've lost count...the air purge which is basically shifting in and out of P does purge some air and adds to the total fluid you have to add.
 

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I think I've asked this before and, if so, I apologize, but how do we know that 1.92 quarts isn't the quantity of fluid that Honda intends to be used and anything above 1.92 quarts is technically overfilled?
 
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