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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone out there changed their own plugs.?.? Is it hard to get to the backside.?.?
 

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Not really. I just read up on the forum posts, watched some youtube videos, and found it to be quite simple. The only issue I had with the back plugs was that, due to their location, I was doing everything by feel only and not by sight. Minor inconvenience, though.
 

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Not too hard to do. I'm 83 and didn't have any trouble. Just throw a pad or blanket on top of the engine and hang over the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. Any new or updated info on plugs.?.? NGK still the way to go.?.?
 

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It is easy. I changed mine out in about an hour...that included the time it took to get the appropriate tools out, change the plugs, clean up, and put everything away. I think if I did this job again, I could get it done in about 1/2 that time.
 

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2007 Nimbus Grey Metallic RTL
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Did mine. It was pretty easy. As was said, the rear ones are a bit of a pain to get to - especially if you're vertically challenged. Luckily, I'm 6'4", so it wasn't too bad. Make sure you have a dedicated 5/8" spark plug socket as it makes the job easier. Using two 6" extensions rather than one 12" extension is also much better for the rears. I bought six stock NGK's from Amazon for less than $60 shipped to my door. Dealership charges around $20 for each plug, so that wasn't happening. Lastly, ensure that you DO NOT use anti-seize on the plugs and use an actual torque wrench to tighten the plugs to 13lb/ft. The plugs have an anti-seize coating on the threads already to prevent any sticking. Using excess anti-seize can alter the torque values.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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That anti-seize issue was puzzling, to say the least.

I decided to use a very small amount of AS on the threads since:
1) the FSM says to use anti-seize, and
2) the FSM quotes the torque (13 lb-ft) which is no doubt predicated on the application of AS on the plug threads.

Unfortunately, the OEM supplier (NGK/Denso) does not quote the amount of torque to use in their bulletin about not using AS on their plugs. So my fall back position is as above. IMO and fwiw and ymmv and all that.
 

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The use of anti-seize was something I had to do some research on because I saw so many opinions on whether to use it or not. After digging into it more and looking up info on the NGK spark plugs I decided against it. I do not recall where I saw this, but I do remember seeing that if you don't use it, 13 lb-ft torque was recommended whereas 15-16 lb-ft was recommended if AS was used.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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The use of anti-seize was something I had to do some research on because I saw so many opinions on whether to use it or not. After digging into it more and looking up info on the NGK spark plugs I decided against it. I do not recall where I saw this, but I do remember seeing that if you don't use it, 13 lb-ft torque was recommended whereas 15-16 lb-ft was recommended if AS was used.
Without a source, that torque value is meaningless imo. The Honda FSM says to use AS on the OEM plugs and to use 13 lb-ft torque. Aluminum heads... don't want to overtorque.

Your conclusion seems logical, but I have to assume that Honda has already allowed for the usage of AS in their 13 lb-ft number.
 

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Without a source, that torque value is meaningless imo. The Honda FSM says to use AS on the OEM plugs and to use 13 lb-ft torque. Aluminum heads... don't want to overtorque.

Your conclusion seems logical, but I have to assume that Honda has already allowed for the usage of AS in their 13 lb-ft number.
I torqued mine to 14lb/ft simply because I don't like odd numbers. :act024:
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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And we're assuming the torque wrenches are accurate too.
 

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I changed them and they were quite easy. Rear you do more by feel, so be gentle when placing plugs into the tubes.
 

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And we're assuming the torque wrenches are accurate too.
Very true. They could be slightly off. Nevertheless, whether it's 12lb/ft or 15, you'll be ok. 10 or 17 is likely the low and high limits of "acceptable" torque, but the days of just "snugging them up by hand" are gone. Especially with aluminum heads.
 

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When working with aluminum heads I snap an old fuel line over the plug end tip to use for starting the threads. It keeps me from cross threading the new plug. I turn and snug up the plug using the hose before I use the plug socket with torque wrench.

 

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I do not recall where I saw this, but I do remember seeing that if you don't use it, 13 lb-ft torque was recommended whereas 15-16 lb-ft was recommended if AS was used.
This is backwards. Applied torque must be reduced if/when AS is used, because it lowers the CoF at the threads (makes 'em slicker).
 
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