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Discussion Starter #1
This is an easy upgrade, and if you have to take a caliper off or drain your brake fluid for some reason, its not a bad time to do it at all. After you get your wheels and rotors off, it takes less than an hour to swap out all the lines. I bought stoptech 950.40014 for the front and stoptech 950.40512 for the rear. Cost me $100 total, $50 for each kit. Before you start you absolutely MUST HAVE a 10mm flare nut wrench! A regular 10mm wrench will strip your brake line nuts. Better to be safe than sorry. A can of liquid wrench or WD-40 is also a must. Once you brake the rusty brake line nuts loose its easy and self explanatory. The back has two separate lines on each side, so don't get confused; just look for the second line along the frame.

I took this on while trying to rebuild a caliper: http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/...n-2006-2014/139233-brake-caliper-rebuild.html
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The kit replaces both sides. The rear kit has 4 lines, the front kit has 2. I bought on Amazon.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here is a pic of the front:


I will say it takes quite a while to bleed the air out of the lines after the whole system has been drained.
 

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2014 Sport
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Here is a pic of the front:


I will say it takes quite a while to bleed the air out of the lines after the whole system has been drained.
What method did you use for bleeding? I have found that the the vacuum type bleeders on the Ridge really need some sort of sealant (teflon, pipe dope etc) on the bleeder screws threads. Without, it is a long and arduous process.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I didn't use a vacuum. I used the old-fashioned method; my wife worked the pedal while I crawled under each wheel and bled the calipers.
 

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2006 RTL, ~160k miles
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Any difference in pedal feel with the stainless lines? I just got my ridge and pedal feel/initial travel is my biggest complaint right now.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was hoping for a more firm pedal feel, but I didn't get that. It's possible I didn't get all the air out of my lines, so I intend to bleed them more just to see. It seems like sloppy brake pedal feel is somewhat standard on Ridgeline.
 

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A nice trick for bleeding brakes is to get a preferably clear hose that will slip over the end of the bleeder valve. Put the other end of the hose in a half full can of brake fl. Making sure to submerge the hose in the fluid. Start with the farthest wheel from the master cyl. Make sure the master cyl. stays full. Pump the brakes until no more air is in the system. Any time you need to pour out the container, make sure to close the bleeder valve. (flare nut wrench is handy for those too.) This method can easily be done by one person, but is much smoother with 2.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I bled the lines again and did improve the pedal feel, but its still not as firm as I had hoped. I think this is just as good as you can get with this vehicle. I guess the only advantage to the steel brake lines is that they will last longer.
 
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