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Weirdest thing happened, the steering wheel controls were being intermittent for a few days and then stopped all together. I have a pioneer HU and I brought it back to the shop that installed everything. They replaced the wire/harness with two different one's and the steering wheel controls still do not work. They say that the problem is in the column. Any ideas? I would like to check the fuse, but not sure which one to check.
 

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Weirdest thing happened, the steering wheel controls were being intermittent for a few days and then stopped all together. I have a pioneer HU and I brought it back to the shop that installed everything. They replaced the wire/harness with two different one's and the steering wheel controls still do not work. They say that the problem is in the column. Any ideas? I would like to check the fuse, but not sure which one to check.
It's not unusual for a shop to misdiagnose a non-universal system control & interface like OEM steering wheel controls. What I mean is: unlike other electronic systems, steering wheel controls don't necessarily "speak the same language" from one OEM to the next, although there are many similarities between them - which is why aftermarket companies offer programmable "universal" adapters.

Depending on the knowledge and curiosity of the shop that diagnosed your RL controls, they *could be* passing off a "defect" simply because they don't have knowledge or time to thoroughly derive an accurate conclusion.

To best of my knowledge, there is no solid method to test Honda's steering wheel controls, but a search of this (or other Honda) forums might result in good info. And then there's google - of course. There are specific pulses output by the engaging of controls and without knowing the value of expected results, it could be difficult to properly diagnose. But generally speaking, a multimeter testing the OEM wiring where the adapter connects to factory wiring is the starting place. Because *most fuses* in a vehicle protect more than one accessory at a timeI would rule out any fuses related issue IF there are no other accessories functioning normally - until knowing if the factory wire is conducting the expected pulse, resistance or voltage first.

Fish around the web for the experience of others before spending anymore time or $. You'll likely find what you need. At the bare minimum, you'll need a meter and access to the factory wiring behind the head unit to get the diagnosis ball rolling.

OR, you could ask the shop how they determined the controls in the wheel are "bad". IF the controls are "bad" - which I suspect is NOT the case, a visit to a bone yard is likely in your future.
 

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OH HECK YES. Again, I'm not versed in the topic specific to the RL but the fact that another steering wheel mounted control is misbehaving, you have pretty solid evidence of an interrelated issue.

Without looking at reference materials - but having experience with other vehicles, the wiring associated with wheel mounted controls follow the same route and more than likely have a single interconnection between the wheel/column and vehicle wiring. Could be something simple - or not. But simple is where you start, like checking that multipin plugs are properly seated. But those things rarely "fail" on their own.

Has anyone been under the dash, around the steering column? How about, was your RL in for the air bag recall?
 

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Weirdest thing happened, the steering wheel controls were being intermittent for a few days and then stopped all together. I have a pioneer HU and I brought it back to the shop that installed everything. They replaced the wire/harness with two different one's and the steering wheel controls still do not work. They say that the problem is in the column. Any ideas? I would like to check the fuse, but not sure which one to check.

Here is a reference point to start on...

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=clock+ring+on+steering+wheel&qpvt=clock+ring+on+steering+wheel&qpvt=clock+ring+on+steering+wheel&FORM=IGRE
 

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3-4 months after the headunit was installed
After you mentioned cruise control failure and assuming no one has done anything in/around the steering wheel/column since the HU was installed, OldNorske's suggestion about the clock ring makes perfect sense.

FYI: clock ring refers to a disc shaped mechanism that allows the wheel to turn while maintaining electrical connections. It's really pretty simple - the design uses compression connections to maintain contact between controls and vehicle wiring. The problem *could be* as simple as dirty contacts or a physically broken component. Since you've lost controls on both sides of the wheel, there could be a central problem right behind the cover. One side of the ring is bolted to the steering column, so diagnoses usually requires exposing it via wheel disassembly and potentially removing the wheel altogether. With the air bag living inside the wheel cover, you really need someone who knows what they are doing to dig into the root cause. Air bags can be dangerous, so dealerships and body shops are usually the best resource for dealing with that sort of thing. I guarantee any body shop dealing with modern vehicle collision repair knows all about air bags, clock rings & intermittent wheel controls - but the dealer might be the shortest route to getting the issue fixed. If that idea gives you heartburn (like it does me), might be worth your time to check out a body shop or two. Just a suggestion...
 

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After you mentioned cruise control failure and assuming no one has done anything in/around the steering wheel/column since the HU was installed, OldNorske's suggestion about the clock ring makes perfect sense.

FYI: clock ring refers to a disc shaped mechanism that allows the wheel to turn while maintaining electrical connections. It's really pretty simple - the design uses compression connections to maintain contact between controls and vehicle wiring. The problem *could be* as simple as dirty contacts or a physically broken component. Since you've lost controls on both sides of the wheel, there could be a central problem right behind the cover. One side of the ring is bolted to the steering column, so diagnoses usually requires exposing it via wheel disassembly and potentially removing the wheel altogether. With the air bag living inside the wheel cover, you really need someone who knows what they are doing to dig into the root cause. Air bags can be dangerous, so dealerships and body shops are usually the best resource for dealing with that sort of thing. I guarantee any body shop dealing with modern vehicle collision repair knows all about air bags, clock rings & intermittent wheel controls - but the dealer might be the shortest route to getting the issue fixed. If that idea gives you heartburn (like it does me), might be worth your time to check out a body shop or two. Just a suggestion...
Actually, the cable reel ("clock spring") is a multi-conductor ribbon cable that is coiled up near the center of the wheel. It "tightens" and "loosens" as the wheel is turned (hence the term "clock spring". It does not use spring-loaded pins or wipers on a contact surface to maintain an electrical connection.

Each audio-related switch assembly on the steering wheel uses a resistor network to select a specific resistance value each time a button is pressed. This is an analog system based on resistance values. Unlike communication between computers and other modules on the vehicle, the steering wheel buttons do not communicate to their respective devices using digital signals. The cruise buttons use a simple switch matrix - no resistors.

One exception to this was some older GM models that used an array of IR transmitters on the moving section of the steering wheel that transmitted coded signals to fixed IR receivers. I believe the function was communicated by varying the frequency of light pulses. The transmitter section required only a power source.

Some makes and model do, however, use a "steering wheel module" to accept button presses that get digitally coded and transmitted over a low-speed data bus. The Ridgeline does not.
 

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Initially, it sounds to me like a connector on the cable reel came loose. Less likely, but still possible, are a few broken traces in the cable reel.
 

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Actually, the cable reel ("clock spring") is a multi-conductor ribbon cable that is coiled up near the center of the wheel. It "tightens" and "loosens" as the wheel is turned (hence the term "clock spring". It does not use spring-loaded pins or wipers on a contact surface to maintain an electrical connection.

Each audio-related switch assembly on the steering wheel uses a resistor network to select a specific resistance value each time a button is pressed. This is an analog system based on resistance values. Unlike communication between computers and other modules on the vehicle, the steering wheel buttons do not communicate to their respective devices using digital signals. The cruise buttons use a simple switch matrix - no resistors.

One exception to this was some older GM models that used an array of IR transmitters on the moving section of the steering wheel that transmitted coded signals to fixed IR receivers. I believe the function was communicated by varying the frequency of light pulses. The transmitter section required only a power source.

Some makes and model do, however, use a "steering wheel module" to accept button presses that get digitally coded and transmitted over a low-speed data bus. The Ridgeline does not.
WOH! Given the duty cycles of a steering wheel, Kapton (or other) ribbons have come a long way since their first use in mechanically articulating consumer devices.

Pardon me while I order up a service manual!
 

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how would I find the cable reel? What do I need to take apart?
The airbag will need to be removed to inspect the connector on the rotating side of the cable reel. The steering wheel will need to be removed to access the cable reel. I suggest leaving this type of repair to the dealer since airbags are involved.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I will definitely have the dealer look at it...I don't want to mess with the airbag. Thank you and I will keep you posted.

does anyone have a part number for the clock spring (cable reel)?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Got the part and I finally had time to get it installed. Everything works again. Thank you for the advice and expertise!!!
 

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Posting here as a reminder, I have a similar issue now only the Audio Controls have went out, and the Cruise Controls are fine, possibly the same "clock spring" issue, any thoughts "recent experiences" and updates @drace99 are appreciated
 
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