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The 2006 Ridgeline steering wheel does NOT have a hand-hole at the BOTTOM of the steering wheel. I guess I'm used to having this from my Acura and Odyssey, and am finding it uncomfortable to hold it to the side.

I think that the design I want is called a "Racing Steering Wheel", which does have the hand-hole at the bottom...not because I'm racing, but because it is more comfortable and easier to steer when driving for more that 5 minutes.
 

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Amen.
I have had mine for 3 months and I still can't find a confortable grip.
The first thing I noticed when test driving was that there is not a hole at the bottom of the steering wheel which is where I have always gripped.
This is my only complaint about the Ridgeline.
 

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I think that the design I want is called a "Racing Steering Wheel", which does have the hand-hole at the bottom
I don't know of any racing driver that would grip the steering wheel at the bottom. The best grip for racing is at 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock because those hand positions allow the maximum amount of wheel turn without moving your hands on the wheel. 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock are good too.
 

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I was taught 10 & 2 but... I don't think he means an actual racing wheel (although it would be cool to be able to take the steering wheel with you like they do in F1 - try and steal it then!). I think he means a different spoke arrangement. Any alignment tech would be able to do that. Just loosen it up and turn the wheel the retighten everything. I don't know what that would do to the air bag however. I wouldn't chance it myself. I like it just the way it is.:D
 

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I guess what I should have said is that the 9-3 and 10-2 positions are the best grips for any driving, not just racing. If you have both hands at the bottom of the wheel, your ability to turn the wheel very far in either direction is very restricted. In an emergency situation, it can mean the difference between avoiding the situation or becoming part of it. I understand the lack of a comfortable position in the RL because the steering wheel is farther away that most other vehicles. Having raced for many years, I just don't feel comfortable with my hands at the bottom. I think I have finally reached a decent compromise by bringing my seat back a little more vertical that I used to. I hook my thumbs over the side spokes and my arms no longer tire so quickly and it's probably better for my aging arthritic back anyway.
 

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If I may put two more cents into this thread...I have been told that things have changed and I'm having some trouble with those changes. One of these changes involves air bags. We all know there is an airbag in the center of the steering wheel. I have been informed by two Highway Patrolmen that if you hold the wheel as I was taught (10 and 2 position, firm grip on the wheel) you are very likely to have your thumbs broken should the air bag be deployed. I guess you are supposed to keep all your fingers and both thumbs on the outside of the wheel. I'm having some trouble remembering this but I'm working on it. Broken thumbs sound like a very unpleasant experience. Sounds like something the Mafia would do to "make you an offer you can't refuse.":eek:
 

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I have been informed by two Highway Patrolmen that if you hold the wheel as I was taught (10 and 2 position, firm grip on the wheel) you are very likely to have your thumbs broken should the air bag be deployed.
It wouldn't happen on the RL, Spritegeezer. If you'll look at your steering wheel, you will see that the air bag cover is inboard of the controls, a long ways from your thumbs. What the patrolman was referring to was the fact that as the air bag deploys, it blows that cover off (it's hinged at the bottom). My son was hit by a woman that ran a red light and he says the air bag sure does sting though, and being 6'5", he doesn't sit close to the wheel.

BTW, I use to race a Spridget and also had a Bugeye at one time.
 

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First thought when considering any of the design elements of the Ridge is "Total Safety." You are being forced to put your hands where you will not be hurt if/when the airbag deploys. You guys don't really think that Honda brought something this sophisticated to market without engineering the primary human interface to the highest level of their ability, do you???
 

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Personally, I think every inch of this truck was engineered for something (safety, ergonomics, etc.) I don't think that Honda went into the North American truck market lightly.
 

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Webwader said:
BTW, I use to race a Spridget and also had a Bugeye at one time.
Still have mine. Retired it from the track competitively but can still be talked into a solo run or two. Since I lost 30 pounds it can be fun to drive again, but scarey. It really makes you appreciate all the safety and comfort features of the Ridgeline when you drive a vehicle from the 1950's or 60's:eek: .
 

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i completely agree about the missing space in the bottom of the wheel since i use that space in other vehicles when I'm making a tight turn. also when backing up a towed trailer i think having it open at the bottom would make it easier. one can adapt to the lack of it of course, but it would have been nicer to just have it there. i also agree with 9 & 3 currently because of the airbag causing more abrasions on the forearms upon deployment in the traditional 10 & 2 positions.
ridgelurker
 

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Still have mine. Retired it from the track competitively but can still be talked into a solo run or two.
I sold mine back in 1979 to a friend who, after racing a few years, sold it to another friend of mine. The car was raced competitively for 20+ years after I sold it. It was repainted once, worn out a few engines and never suffered a crash. The last time I talked to him a few years ago, he really wanted to get into historic racing, but at that time they still did not allow cars with flared fenders. I don't know if they have changed the rules or not. It may be scary to drive on the street, but it sure was fun to be able to run 125mph in a car that was lucky to hit 85 in stock form and to be able to get 8,000rpm in 4th gear out of an old long stroke that was designed back in the early 50's and had only two intake and three exhaust ports.
 

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I don't think that the lack of a 6:00 grip "hole" has anything to do with Honda's new "Safety For Everyone" campaign. The Odyssey, Accord Sedan, and the new Civic sedan all have a grip at the 6:00 position. I think that Honda designed the Ridgeline steering wheel (along with the Element and Pilot) to have a sporty but rugged looking wheel. Notice that the Accord coupe and S2000 both have 3-spoke wheels. My previous car was an Accord coupe, and it took some getting used to not being able to hold the steering wheel at 6:00, so I was used to it when I got the Ridgeline. I will say though, the Ridgeline sure has some comfortable "crusing" positions, aka, one hand at 12:00, with the other arm or elbow on either the drivers door or center armrest.
 

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I would say that, 1. no hole at 6 o'clock, 2. no telescoping feature, and 3. the angle of the wheel that puts the 6 o'clock closest to you, is a particularly bad combination

I don't do a lot of towing, yet, but certainly for backing up with a trailer it would be nice to be able to do that "cheat" by putting your hand in the 6 o'clock position.

The thing about the thumbs breaking off. I don't think that is related to the airbag itself blowing the thumbs back, but rather the airbag as it inflates smacks your forearms and forces them apart and away from the wheel, which in turn could cause a problem for your thumbs if they are hooked around the steering wheel.

And what's with whatever that thing is by the dead pedal that my toe hits when I try to put my foot on it? I haven't bothered to look at what it is yet, but it seems to get in the way of a true dead pedal function.
 

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Because of safety, these steering wheels in all cars are not designed for you to hold it at the bottom. If there is a hole at the bottom, then it is there only because they liked the "look" of the wheel. The proper driving positions for your hands is the 9-3 or 10-2 positions and EVERYTHING is designed to meet those positions...even your steering wheel controls. that is why you don't see any steering wheel controls at the bottom of the wheel...your hands are not supposed to be there while driving. Even your seat design for your back and shoulders is designed with 10-2 in mind. You airbag deployment is relying on 10-2/9-3.

Think about it...go take a driving test and drive with your hands down there. Then palm the wheel when you turn and don't go hand over hand...you will fail your driving test.

I understand your complaints...as old habits die hard and none of us drive down the road with our hands at 10-2.....but manufacturers build them that way unfortunately. Personally, I am a twelve o clock draper over the top of the wheel, or, even though it is the worst place for injury, I rest them INSIDE the wheel on top of the airbag. Easier drumming position!!! :D
 

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ShootinDownTheStars said:
Easier drumming position!!! :D
You got that right :eek:
 

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I'd like to have a telescoping steering column, for my own comfort, and having a tall sitting hight, I can't see the top of the speedometer, as the steering wheel blocks my view. My biggest pet peeve is actually the large Honda "H" in the middle of the airbag cover. Don't try slamming the horn with anything but the palm/heel of your hand, 'cause that "H" really does a number on your knuckles.:(
 
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