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I have a 2012 Ridgeline. I had a problem installing a Softopper. I got to the part where I was supposed to use the provided Torx wrench to remove some bolts. I think the provided wrench must have been a size too small and it stripped the hole. There still is a little traction around the edges and I am hoping that a wrench one size larger will work. I don't know what to order. Is a wrench for the below screw (see photo) called a Star wrench? Thanks!

403607
 

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I believe that takes a T50 socket. You might just try it with the correct size and it may still work.
 

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2019 RTL-E (white on beige) in central Texas
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Is a wrench for the below screw (see photo) called a Star wrench?
It's properly called a "Torx" fastener, requires a "Torx" bit /driver, the size is designated by "T##" (e.g. "T6", "T50", etc). There is no SAE/metric distinction, "Torx" is a globally uniform size standard (one of its benefits).


EDIT - on my G2 those are indeed T50 fasteners holding the tie-down brackets. FYI the next larger standard size is T55 and there's no way you're gonna jam a T55 bit in a T50 fastener, the size-increment is too large a difference.

Good Luck
 
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2006 Ridgeline RTS in Steel Blue
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I believe on a G1 those are also a T50, Can check later today, most likely you were trying to remove it with a Hex Key, which may work some of the time, but the amount of Torque needed to break free an 8yr old T50 is what is causing you to strip it. Get the right tool for the job, apply plenty of penetrating oil, (liquid wrench or PB Blaster) and let it soak for a minimum of an hour
 

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most likely you were trying to remove it with a Hex Key ...... causing you to strip it
That'll round-off the 'star' for sure :cry: . Hopefully with the correct bit there's enough material left for it to engage properly.

@csbrown, if there's 'stuff' in the bottom of the socket-head be sure to clear that out before trying - you'll need the proper Torx bit to engage to its full depth and squarely in the socket. A T50 Torx can transfer a huge amount of torque when fully engaged.

I'd avoid getting any penetrating oil in the socket head itself or on the correct T50 bit - IMO you want all the friction between the socket and the bit you can get. I'd want those two mating surfaces solvent-clean-and-dry.

I seriously doubt you'll be able to get any lube behind the tie-down bracket and the bed liner all the way to the threads of the fastener where they grab the underlying structural piece. IMO if anything a small amount of PB Blaster applied to the tie-down above the fastener, allowed to run-down the bracket, may help break the 'age bond' between the head of the fastener and that bracket. But again, I'd take care to keep it out of the socket in the head.

BTW, under NO circumstances try to re-use that damaged fastener if you manage to get it out - replace that sucker.

Good Luck.
 

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Another old trick is to use a little steel wool on the tip of the bit if it is a little loose in the fitting. This is assuming you are using the correct size bit and have mild stripping.
 

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I've used aluminum foil in the past but I like the steel wool idea. I'll try that next time I strip out a torx, happens all the time.
 
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