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So I might get my sway bars next Monday, and am deciding if they go on at the same time as the lowering springs or after.
 

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The ones you see in the pic are part of a prototype order made many months ago prior to manufacture. I bought these prior to knowing because their are no others in existance that I know of and I didnt want to let them pass me by. There is a chance that no more will be made. So, i took the risk but I felt confident from the info I had that they would be an upgrade. It is a fair question and i have asked this question myself. If I get a response from the fabricator I will post here. Regardless, they are going on my truck.

Im probably not going to install to next weekend because of travel, but I will post my install and my impressions.

They are noticeably thicker than stock and they are heavier than they look. I was suprised at the weight. They have nicely done powder coat finish. I am not going to try to guess as to the material or treatment processes - i honestly dont know.

I'm not the seller, I'm a risk tolerant buyer, and I'm not even recommending them (yet) at least until after install.

You have to decide for yourself. I just posted to let you know they are available in limited quantity. They are probably leftovers of a limited run. As far as I know, they might be gone already.



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You have sway problems in a Ridgeline? SMH
 

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I had to find a sway problem with significant effort but you use a decreasing radius wet mud strewn corner with a good run off area. At speed I found excessive understeer and difficult management of anti lock / traction control when it engages at speed, requiring reaction to counter delay.

That test convinced me to do the sway bars, Ridgeline drifts should feel better to my style of driving.
 

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Traditionally, just from physics, a hollow tube has more torsional stiffness than a solid one given that they both have the same mass and material composition. G2, in its OEM configuration, runs a 25mm solid front and a 26.5mm hollow rear (AWD) or 25.4 hollow rear (FWD). Going with 28.575mm solid, which according to them is 75% stiffer than stock, which is crazy and not sure how heavy they are. I am not sure if both the front and rear are the same dimensions and how it affects the handling of the truck; more oversteer or neutral or more understeer. I would have to wait for you guys to install and do an OEM to CC comparison.


@Mnstr2000 , since you have access to some fancy equipment, wanna do a test to find out the spring rate of your lowering springs? ;) ;)


This is from the manufacturer:
They're cold drawn SAE 1045 steel. No heat treating is necessary as sway bars are not springs in the traditional sense because they sit at rest in an unloaded state. That's the gist of a rather complicated discussion from the engineers regarding metal choices for sway bar manufacturing.

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Though these are not your words, but the mfg's; they are not correct. stabilizer bars are indeed springs, though they are not coil springs. Transmitting load and storing energy is what defines a spring, and these do that. But, I will let them define it how they want to.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Though these are not your words, but the mfg's; they are not correct. stabilizer bars are indeed springs, though they are not coil springs. Transmitting load and storing energy is what defines a spring, and these do that. But, I will let them define it how they want to.
I agree with you that not not all springs are coils (i.e. leaf springs) and sway bars work on the same physics. I didn't read their statement so literally but rather they are not functionally the same and also hold no or little tension when level.

So I agree with you and don't disagree with them.

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I did a rear sway bar on the 2013 Subaru Outback I owned and it made a big difference in terms of overall flatness of the vehicle and made it fun to drive.

Not sure I have the same desire from the RL being that it is a truck and so much bigger. Eager to hear what you think
I did the same thing on my 2004 Accord (Acura TL sway bar) and our 2006 Acura CSX (Civic R sway bar). Best, most effective mod you can do for handling improvements. It ranks up there with the rear door checker hack on the 2017-2019 RL's bang for the buck.
 

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Hi all - sorry to hijack the thread. Even though the Ridgeline is on the JSport 1.5f and .75r, I wanted less lean during some turns so I took part on the initial group by a few months back. I recd the sways late Wednesday and did a quick inspection. Powder coated in a nice gloss black and mounting hardware looked good. The new sway bars are definitely heavier and beefier than OEM. A buddy who owns a VW group shop owed me a favor so he offered to do it along with an oil change and tire rotation. Yea a Honda getting worked on by VW/Audi/Porsche guy but he and his team do great work. He said it was pretty straight forward especially if you are using a lift and had to lower the sub frame a bit. He mentioned the bolt holes on the bars was a "tad" smaller so he had to make the holes bigger to attach to the end links. All in all, took him and one other person on his team about 2 hours for the oil change, tire rotation and sway bar installation. 30 minutes for an alignment. Driving impressions are positive. Straight line, you are not going to notice a difference. Going thru some turns ie entering or exiting the freeway, the ridgeline is more flat. Able to take those turns 10 mph faster than before. No increase noise or ride harshness. One thing to note, I do not know how this will impact some of the trails I off-road on other than disconnecting the end links when necessary. Shop was able to take some pics and video on their go pro so will post once I receive it.
 

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Beefy swaybars are great for highway driving and getting out on some twisty roads. But offroading articulation will suffer.

My Beetle has a KW suspension and 1" bars front and rear. We have a little transition into our driveway and I usually come in with one of my rear wheels in the air. Looks pretty funny and would make it easy to remove the wheel without a jack.

If you could find a quick clip to disconnect the sway bars for offroading, that would give you the best of both worlds.
 

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I do not off-road.
A few drives up groomed Forrest roads is it.
2 sets of wheels, Summer time 20 or 22 light weight wheels with Pilot Super Sport 4s.
Also stock rims with Michelin ice X 2 snow tires that get changed out with the stock tires each year until original tires get replaced with low resistance road trip tires, on perhaps a third set of rims.

Might not be able to wait after sway bars get here for my 12-01-2020 install appointment and do it in the dirt, looks like Monday 11-23 is delivering time.
 

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I do not off-road.
A few drives up groomed Forrest roads is it.
2 sets of wheels, Summer time 20 or 22 light weight wheels with Pilot Super Sport 4s.
Also stock rims with Michelin ice X 2 snow tires that get changed out with the stock tires each year until original tires get replaced with low resistance road trip tires, on perhaps a third set of rims.

Might not be able to wait after sway bars get here for my 12-01-2020 install appointment and do it in the dirt, looks like Monday 11-23 is delivering time.
You might want to make those road trips wheels 17-inchers:

 

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Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
You might want to make those road trips wheels 17-inchers:

That is a pretty poorly written article that lacks specifics and makes a general assertion, based on the Car & Driver article it references, that bigger wheels are heavier and therfore lower performance.

The C&D article: "It’s obvious from the test that as wheels and tires grow in size, they also grow in weight."

That is an shockingly ignorant statement for a professional car publication to make. That is only true if you choose a rim and tire combination that is heavier. Which they obviously did on purpose to make their point.

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That is a pretty poorly written article that lacks specifics and makes a general assertion, based on the Car & Driver article it references, that bigger wheels are heavier and therfore lower performance.

The C&D article: "It’s obvious from the test that as wheels and tires grow in size, they also grow in weight."

That is an shockingly ignorant statement for a professional car publication to make. That is only true if you choose a rim and tire combination that is heavier. Which they obviously did on purpose to make their point.

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There was also the Engineering Explained video referenced in the article. You can almost always find exceptions to the rules. For example, forged or magnesium wheels are much lighter, but also much more expensive, and in the case of magnesium, a bit brittle.

The general rule of more sidewall and less wheel being lighter is supported when all else is equal. Obviously, YMMV.

For general handling improvements, one would likely give up more sidewall, at a slight expense to weight (again, all else being equal). For a softer ride and best MPG, you would lean toward more sidewall, all else being equal.

On a heavy vehicle like the Ridgeline, it will make little difference either way.
 

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I think there are a few aspects at play with bigger wheels. On acceleration, a heavier wheel would rob some of the power to turn the added weight. While cruising, the added weight will act more like a flywheel and provide more kinetic energy (if I am using the correct term) to keep the wheels turning. I guess this could provide lower city MPG's and higher highway MPG's.

I took the Beetle from 16's to 19's and with the very light and expensive forged BBS wheels, the weight went down. Win win!

I bought some less expensive 19's for the Element and you could feel the power loss when the little engine tried to turn those (mostly city driving). Mileage went into the trash.

I would like to find a ~20" wheel combo using the Michelin Pilot 4's so long as I can get an equivalent or better load rating so I don't loose out in the towing capacity.

Mnstr2000, do you have any pics of those 20 and 22 wheels on your RL? I would love to see them.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
I will say that the stock 18x8 ridgeline rims are relatively light reportedly at around 28 lbs. I have 20X9 aftermarket wheels and they are the same at 28 lbs. But like was just said, if you want to pay the price you can get down around 25 lbs or below which is what I consider light weight - but you are going to pay for those.

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Have not got near final decision, 275 40 20 is smaller than stock yet wider, 275 40 22 is taller than stock both have acceptable weight rating. Still have not even received a shipping date on my Ice x snows
 
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