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Discussion Starter #1
There's lots of things that I love about my RL (and a few minor things I don't), but I'm reminded again today how much I really appreciate and use two of it's most distinguishing features - the two-way tailgate and the in-bed trunk.

Sure, I figured they'd be 'handy', but even as a lifelong PU owner I never imagined while shopping how very much they would alter my habits and add to the day-to-day utility and enjoyment of my truck.

I now rarely 'drop' my tailgate (it's great not having to 'reach'), and almost daily toss something into the trunk rather than into the cabin …. well, it's just super nice.

Reminded again this morning as I toted a 5-gallon gas-can for refill (feeding the riding mower), and grabbed a few semi-bulky items a Lowes. No, I don't put the gas can in the trunk but neither do I have to reach/slide the thing to put it in the bed and lash it to a corner tie-down.

Just felt compelled to share that for folks surfing here as they shop.
 

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I agree 100%! The other thing I really like if the cargo tie downs. Handy, at just the right places. I keep about 5 bungee straps in the trunk and use them all the time. Just hauled a new snowblower home, eazy peesy! A couple of days ago, 5 gallons of gas, and a 20LB. LP tank at the same time. Strap them down to the bed and go.
Gotta love it.
 

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Agreed with all counts. Most everyone who goes to get something out of my truck bed puts the tailgate down. When I show them it can be opened the other way, their eyes usually get large and they say, "whoa". It's very rare for me to put the gate down, as well, as opening like a door is just much more convenient for stuff in the bed and trunk. I also keep bungees and ratchet straps in the trunk whenever I need to secure something. When my 2gal gas can needs filled, it rides on top of the trunk with a bungee around the handle and secured at each rear tie down. Doesn't move or tip that way. This is one thing you absolutely CANNOT do with an SUV. If you do, you're putting yourself in danger. At the very least, good luck getting the smell of gas out of the interior anytime sooner than 3-4 days.
 

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This is one thing you absolutely CANNOT do with an SUV. If you do, you're putting yourself in danger.
In between Ridgelines, I've been guilty of transporting gasoline cans and propane tanks in the trunk of a sedan or rear area of a hatchback. I set the HVAC to outside air and high fan in an effort to keep any explosive gasses from exceeding their lower explosive limits. I've ridden in many pickups with gas tanks located inside the cab behind the rear seat and my mom used to have a Ford Pinto. :)
 

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The main reason I bought the Ridgeline was because of the swivel tailgate and bed trunk. The tie downs were an added bonus as I did not know about those. The only time we place the tailgate down is to drink a beer(s) in the garage.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
In between Ridgelines, I've been guilty of transporting gasoline cans and propane tanks in the trunk of a sedan or rear area of a hatchback.
Folks without a PU do what they gotta do.

Showing your professional skillset with reference to 'LEL' ;)
 

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Funny how some stuff sticks with you … it's been over 10 years now since I retired from Federal Superfund Project Management and had my last 40-hr 29CFR1920.120 'refresher', but those numbers still roll off the tongue with ease.

Built and operated one treatment plant that used propane as a solvent (not a combustion process) for extracting creosote from soil - a fascinating 'innovative technology project' taking advantage of the convenient phase-change properties of propane. Up to our ass in handling huge quantities of propane in a closed system - obviously everyone on site very ingrained with the critical concentrations.

Another was a natural gas fired hazardous waste incinerator (120 million BTU/hr) for treatment of soil contaminated with process wastes from the Houston Ship Channel 'chemical corridor' at a rate of 40 tons/hr. Again, critical concentrations for natural gas were ingrained in everyone on site. Long ago and far away ….

396150
 
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