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I had a 2011 Grand Cherokee Overland with the big Hemi, and really loved the vehicle - strong, somewhat sporty for a 5k lb. beast, very luxurious. It was about 6 months old and had 5k miles when we bought it, and we kept it until January 2019.

It wasn't always a basket of roses though. After driving it maybe a few thousand miles I checked the oil for the heck of it while the gas pump was running, and OMG 2 quarts just got it to register on the dipstick! For the first couple of years the thing used oil at a frightening rate, but it wasn't leaking, and no blue smoke either. Chrysler said it was "within the norm" or whatever - wouldn't even consider doing anything about it - and I had constant buyer's remorse about it....made it kinda difficult to enjoy even such a cool machine. If it hadn't been under warranty I'd have been even more upset, but figured if it blows it might be covered. Kept thinking about selling it, but really didn't want to drop what I thought could be a time bomb on some unsuspecting buyer.

At some point a few years in, however, the oil consumption slowed to a pace of maybe a quart between oil changes. Dealer never could tell me why it had happened or why it stopped. Still think it was really weird, especially with an engine - the Hemi - that's been around since the virtual dawn of time.

I like the look of the Ram trucks - actually the G2 has a similar-looking back end - and their performance stats are impressive - wouldn't rule it out - but from my own experience I wouldn't necessarily bank on a perfect experience with the Hemi, even as awesome as it generally is.
 

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I've had my tranny changed out of my 2019 this past January due to it failing. Less than a year of ownership. No towing at that point. I finally used it to tow this past June and picked up a Kubota B1700 with a mower and rear blade. Was around 3500 lbs with the trailer, did not stop on scales to weigh. Picked it up in the mountains of WV and towed it back to where I live. The transmission did great. No issues with overheating or rough shifting. Outside temp was 91 that day and sunny. The only noticeable change was my MPG's dropping down to the mid teens for the return trip.
 

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I've had my tranny changed out of my 2019 this past January due to it failing. Less than a year of ownership. No towing at that point. I finally used it to tow this past June and picked up a Kubota B1700 with a mower and rear blade. Was around 3500 lbs with the trailer, did not stop on scales to weigh. Picked it up in the mountains of WV and towed it back to where I live. The transmission did great. No issues with overheating or rough shifting. Outside temp was 91 that day and sunny. The only noticeable change was my MPG's dropping down to the mid teens for the return trip.
Good to hear. Towed my Kubota BX (2000 + trailer...maybe 3250) with my G1 on 50 miles of windy, hilly roads, including 3 miles of steep gravel, no problem at all. Need to bring it back for service....will see how my 2019 G2 does with it.
 

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Oh yes. It is definitely covered.

not getting a diesel. I don’t tow everyday, once a month, maybe twice, but if the Ridgeline can’t tow a simple 60% of what it claims it can tow, I’m getting a HEMI

looking at a Ram with a HEMI V8 Not a diesel. And I can get one here for $40K 2020 big horn with 72 months 0% versus a 0.9 on my Honda.
I really don't think you should have a problem with towing a couple times a month with a Ridgeline when you're well below the limit. I'd probably just see how things go after the repair. I rarely towed with my Tundra and I am happier with the Ridgeline. I wouldn't want to go back to bigger truck. In any case, whatever you decide I hope it works out for you. And let us know if you do tow with the repaired Ridgeline how it does.
 

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I had a 2011 Grand Cherokee Overland with the big Hemi, and really loved the vehicle - strong, somewhat sporty for a 5k lb. beast, very luxurious. It was about 6 months old and had 5k miles when we bought it, and we kept it until January 2019.

It wasn't always a basket of roses though. After driving it maybe a few thousand miles I checked the oil for the heck of it while the gas pump was running, and OMG 2 quarts just got it to register on the dipstick! For the first couple of years the thing used oil at a frightening rate, but it wasn't leaking, and no blue smoke either. Chrysler said it was "within the norm" or whatever - wouldn't even consider doing anything about it - and I had constant buyer's remorse about it....made it kinda difficult to enjoy even such a cool machine. If it hadn't been under warranty I'd have been even more upset, but figured if it blows it might be covered. Kept thinking about selling it, but really didn't want to drop what I thought could be a time bomb on some unsuspecting buyer.

At some point a few years in, however, the oil consumption slowed to a pace of maybe a quart between oil changes. Dealer never could tell me why it had happened or why it stopped. Still think it was really weird, especially with an engine - the Hemi - that's been around since the virtual dawn of time.

I like the look of the Ram trucks - actually the G2 has a similar-looking back end - and their performance stats are impressive - wouldn't rule it out - but from my own experience I wouldn't necessarily bank on a perfect experience with the Hemi, even as awesome as it generally is.
Ya know, they say if it burns a quart every 1k miles, you never have to change the oil because you keep topping off with fresh! 😁

I wonder if the 5.7L and 6.4L Hemi engines have much in common with the Hemis of the 1950s/60s and early 70s?

The story of the original Hemi is that Chrysler made Don "Big Daddy" Garlits race the Hemi back in the 50s. Garlits had been having success with the old wedge engines and didn't want to change, but Chrysler made him change since they were sponsoring him and wanted publicity for their new engine. The engine performed similar to the wedge engines of the time. Garlits wanted back his old engine, so he advanced the timing on the Hemi to way beyond what any engine was capable of back then, as he was hoping to blow the engine so Chrysler would give him his old engine back. Well, with the advanced timing, the Hemi didn't blow up, but ran like a scalded dog and that convinced Garlits to keep it, and it was the engine that rocketed him into fame.
 

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Ya know, they say if it burns a quart every 1k miles, you never have to change the oil because you keep topping off with fresh! 😁

I wonder if the 5.7L and 6.4L Hemi engines have much in common with the Hemis of the 1950s/60s and early 70s?

The story of the original Hemi is that Chrysler made Don "Big Daddy" Garlits race the Hemi back in the 50s. Garlits had been having success with the old wedge engines and didn't want to change, but Chrysler made him change since they were sponsoring him and wanted publicity for their new engine. The engine performed similar to the wedge engines of the time. Garlits wanted back his old engine, so he advanced the timing on the Hemi to way beyond what any engine was capable of back then, as he was hoping to blow the engine so Chrysler would give him his old engine back. Well, with the advanced timing, the Hemi didn't blow up, but ran like a scalded dog and that convinced Garlits to keep it, and it was the engine that rocketed him into fame.
I think mine was a 5.7 - not the "Big Daddy Garlits" model, but it accelerated in very satisfying fashion :) ! Our 19 year old daughter had a medical situation at college, and we covered the 70 miles to reach her in maybe 45 minutes.

BTW, Big Daddy is literally still the only drag racer I could name. He was apparently great, and that nickname was apparently very memorable - great marketing!
 

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Domed cylinder heads (hemispherical combustion chambers) are nearly obsolete. Chrysler is still milking the "hemi" trademark, though. The design is limited to one intake and exhaust valve per cylinder and it's hard to control emissions. "Hemis" sound good because they're V8's and feel good because their large displacement allows for good low-end torque. Other than the shape of the combustion chamber (which has been used by many other automakers over the decades), there's nothing special about a "hemi". The carbureted, 1.6L, 4-cylinder engine in the 1981 Ford Escort was technically a "hemi" engine, too. It developed all of 65 horsepower and literally made a wheezing sound (my parents bought a new '83 Escort wagon with the 1.6L HO ("High Output" - 80 HP - hold on!) and I had an '86 with the 88 HP 1.9L (which actually felt fast to me at the time having previously owned a '65 Skylark with a two-speed automatic). :)
 

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Party pooper 💩 ......I was trying to have a little "all around - HEMIspherical" fun. Everybody knows, that you know, what a HEMI is.
 

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Actually knew about the hemispherical cylinder heads too (about the limit of my engine knowledge, lol), but like to imagine it's about driving fast all over the hemisphere.
 

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Honda would have to go body-on-frame to go much larger on vehicle size. They are not currently set up to do that, and likely would have a tough time recuperating costs to do so.
They don't even need to go BOF. GC, Durango, VAG MLB platform are good examples.

Sad that Honda didn't learn from their mistake in underdeveloping, scrapping then redesigning the new NSX.

If Honda/Acura really wants to be taken seriously, instead of developing yet another transverse FWD/AWD chassis for the RDX and TLX, they could have spent that money on new RWD based platforms like Ford did with the new Explorer/Aviator and what Mazda is doing with the next gen 6 giving them a jumpoff point for more powerful engines, high capacity rear differentials, and even simple things like being able to use excellent gearboxes (ZF8) instead of being saddled with a turd like the ZF9.
 

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Domed cylinder heads (hemispherical combustion chambers) are nearly obsolete. Chrysler is still milking the "hemi" trademark, though. The design is limited to one intake and exhaust valve per cylinder and it's hard to control emissions. "Hemis" sound good because they're V8's and feel good because their large displacement allows for good low-end torque. Other than the shape of the combustion chamber (which has been used by many other automakers over the decades), there's nothing special about a "hemi". The carbureted, 1.6L, 4-cylinder engine in the 1981 Ford Escort was technically a "hemi" engine, too. It developed all of 65 horsepower and literally made a wheezing sound (my parents bought a new '83 Escort wagon with the 1.6L HO ("High Output" - 80 HP - hold on!) and I had an '86 with the 88 HP 1.9L (which actually felt fast to me at the time having previously owned a '65 Skylark with a two-speed automatic). :)
Agree with you on most of the hemi engines, particularly the newer ones. The 426 Hemi from 1964 - 1971 did have many upgraded parts, though, as it was essentially built for stock car racing. The early 426 Hemi engines sold to the public were racing engines, and then the following year they offered "street" Hemi engines that had less compression, less aggressive timing and different intake/exhaust, but still all of the internal racing goodies. They were expensive, so not a whole lot were sold.

I remember the Plymouth Sapporo / Dodge Conquest from the 70s also had a four-cylinder hemi, although it was entirely from Mitsubishi Japan.

Edit: Chrysler Australia even offered a hemi head for the venerable Slant Six engine. Those are highly sought in the aftermarket.
 

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Anybody know what the combustion chambers look like in a Furd Boss 429 motor? Dayum!, that thang gotta hemi.



.....and I just took it off topic again, sorry.
 

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You're right. Sorry!

Back on topic...

@jimi's was at least the 15th documented transmission failure on the 2G Ridgeline so far.

Seems to be a problem.
I’m sure each and every one of those 15 Ridgeline owners think the Ridgeline (and Honda) are a POS (I would too, fingers crossed).....just like the Chevy, Furd, Ram and ‘yota owners, that had a major problem with their p/u, think their brand of p/u was a POS as well.🤷‍♂️ No such thing as a perfect vehicle......not even Ram, Chevy, Furd, Mazda or ‘yota make 100% flawless vehicles, including engines and transmissions.

Let’s bump that 15 G2 6 speed bad trannies to say 500......divided buy the 100K that have been built.....isn’t that still a low percentage?🤷‍♂️ But that still doesn’t make things better for those unfortunate 15 here.☹

I would still like to see some posts of monitored TFTs while towing loads in excess of 50% capacity.
 
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