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Say, has anyone experienced or read of a test drive in either rain or snow. I know I read of ride and drives happening in Canada, but I yet to read a review of a drive in the snow, or in rain. Both are critical to me, as in this part of Arizona we can have very heavy down pours of either one. The local dealers get there first look on Friday in Pheonix, which is due to have heavy rain, but up in the northern part of teh state I am more concerned about snow ability ( yes it does snow in Arizona, over 100" so far this year up here, I am 7100' above sea level ).
So if anyone has first hand experience, or has found a test drive that mentions driving in either, please post me a link.

Thanks
Robert
 

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Only seen the video of it on the loose dirt track but it faired very well there so I'd imagine it's VTM-4 system would be just as effective for rain or snow.:

http://vtec.net/articles/view-article?article_id=325157


Also, here's a snip it which explains the VTM-4 in detail from Honda's tech article:
http://hondanews.com/catID2138?mid=2005020137372&mime=asc

"There are three distinct modes of VTM-4 engagement. The first - called the acceleration torque control (ATC) mode - is unique to this system. It works even on dry pavement to proactively distribute driving torque to all four wheels as the Ridgeline accelerates from a stop to cruising speed. One notable benefit of this mode is that traction is immediately available to move the vehicle from rest through a slippery intersection before slippage occurs. (Once a wheel slips, the traction available for forward propulsion and lateral restraint is significantly diminished.)


A second advantage is that apportioning drive torque among all four wheels greatly diminishes the likelihood of torque steer. Handling dynamics are also improved. Reducing the propulsive force carried by the front tires leaves more adhesion for steering the vehicle into a tight bend or for holding cornering arc in the middle of a turn. In other words, the Ridgeline's dynamic balance is greatly enhanced by ATC logic.


Rear wheel torque rises smoothly from zero to the optimum setting in proportion to vehicle acceleration (both forward and reverse). At higher speeds, the front wheels are capable of providing the desired thrust with excellent handling so torque delivered to the rear wheels automatically diminishes with speed. While cruising, all driving torque is delivered by the front wheels in the interests of smoothness, quietness, and fuel efficiency.


The second engagement mode uses wheel slippage control logic. If the difference in rotational speed between front and rear wheels rises because of a slippery surface or poor traction at the front of the vehicle, that condition is detected by wheel-speed sensors which are monitored by VTM-4's ECU. In response, the ECU commands an increasing amount of torque for the rear wheels. Torque is proportional to both slip rate and the rate at which the slip rate is increasing. This operation is similar to conventional slip-based all-wheel-drive systems already on the market.


The third mode of all-wheel-drive engagement activates when the driver presses the lock button mounted on the instrument panel. The maximum amount of rear-drive torque is locked in until the vehicle gets moving and exceeds six mph, at which time rear drive torque is gradually diminished. By 18 mph, the lock mode is fully disengaged. When vehicle speed drops below 18 mph, the lock mode automatically reengages. The shift lever must be in the first, second, or reverse-gear position to use the lock mode.


The maximum torque delivered to the rear wheels allows the Ridgeline to claw up a 28-degree (53-percent slope) dirt grade. On a split-mu (split-friction) grade (different amounts of traction at each wheel), VTM-4 automatically provides sufficient rear-wheel torque to help the vehicle climb steep and slippery terrain such as a steep driveway with patches of snow and ice."
 
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