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Discussion Starter #1
In reading the comments, take note that for some it's between the RL and the F-150 value models.

 

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Counterpoints

9-speed discussion at 1:40

The 3G Pilot has always offered the 9-speed since it was introduced in 2015, so the 9-speed is not necessarily a "recent' addition like it is to the Ridgeline. Regardless, the differences in both performance and fuel economy are almost unnoticeable - I certainly wouldn't say the 9-speed "wakes up" these metrics.

Spare tire discussion at 3:28

It's true you'd have to unload the bed to access the spare tire, but you have to consider how often you'll have something in the bed and need the spare at the same time. It may be an inconvenience in very rare circumstances, but will probably never be an issue for most people. The trade-off is that the spare is kept cleaner and is easier to check.

"Unibody construction vehicle with a subframe" at 3:54 and "there's no real frame - there's a subframe" at 14:15

The Ridgeline has a full frame that runs from the front to the rear just like any other truck. The difference is that the Ridgeline's is welded to its body rather than bolted to it.

"Sport" shift mode at 6:45

The "S" position is for sequential mode. There is no "sport" mode.

At 6:58, Nathan complains about pushbutton shifters because he's a "klutz" who spills coffee "all the time".

If only there were beverage containers with lids... :)

Sound level vs. Ranger

They called the Ridgeline's overall interior noise level 63 dB and the Ranger 61 dB. The difference appeared to be less than 2 dB. Differences of 1-2 dB are undetectable by most people. Differences of even 3 dB are barely detectable unless doing a direct A-B comparison and would be difficult to compare when moving from one vehicle to another. Furthermore, the spectral content has more effect on how "good" or "quiet" a vehicle sounds than the overall noise level so this test isn't very meaningful.

"Not the best [navigation] system"

They obviously weren't familiar with how the system operates as they were over-complicating the process by getting ahead of themselves and not following the voice prompts and information on the screen correctly. You can navigate using only your voice after pressing one button on the steering wheel.
 

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I've seen many spares on the underside of trucks that were eventually rendered useless because their cable drop mechanism was frozen up with rust. Most folks just don't maintain something like that. OTOH, more and more mfrs are pushing for carrying a can of "fix-a-flat". You can carry that and still have a workable spare in the Ridge.

I wish reviewers would comment more on overall driving aspects like visibility, maneuverability, parking, and driving down a slick patchy highway.

I'm glad Nathan pointed out the ability to reach into the bed.
 

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I've seen many spares on the underside of trucks that were eventually rendered useless because their cable drop mechanism was frozen up with rust.
Not to mention the often extreme strain and dirty contortions required to actually retrieve an under-frame spare in less than ideal roadside conditions (BTDT).

IME any OE pickup-spare location has a better than even chance of presenting a less-than-optimal roadside replacement experience, all of 'em will give rise to curses at one time or another :LOL: :mad:.

Thankfully as mentioned the need is rare for most of us, the episodes usually soon forgotten.
 

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My comments to them:

What is sad, and you are a truck testing channel. You didn't talk about the handling of the Ridgeline. Go take corners in it. It's the best PAVEMENT handling truck made on the market. You guys must not push a truck in the corners and test the edge of the envelope of handling. I've driven everything on the market and on overpasses, underpasses, name it, the body on frames aren't even close. Another test would be testing the Ridgeline and the competitors in heavy rain, and in snow with snow tires. Failure on your tests. This seems to be towing, rock crawling, and drive slow channel.
And they call themselves "truck guys", then how do you not know you can remove the spare and mount it in the bed? The reason it's in a slide tray in the trunk is to protect it from the elements and the simple fact that most drives in the truck, say I dunno 90+% you aren't towing anything and nothing is in the bed. I don't expect favoritism, but I'm tired of reviews of sportscars and trucks where they don't do any real testing. They also didn't evaluate the torque vectoring all wheel drive system. I've pushed the truck extremely hard in corners and in flood rain many times so I fail to understand why a truck testing channel cannot do the same. I'd start my own youtube channel but there are already a million people doing it and I don't like to be on camera on the internet.

Nothing will change with the trucky truck crowd. At least Honda made it. Geez. And Nathan, his personality, is completely different than mine so I can't stand him. He needs another burger like a crackhead needs another hit.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Since they have a Honda press vehicle (plate 3421) hopefully they will do something offroad and give you guys with 2020's some more color for the 9 speed. Yeah, the the RL not the ideal vehicle to make their channel $ but overall, they have been fair with the 2020.
 

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Someday maybe a comparison review of compact, short bed pickups will actually show what it is like to carry a sheet of plywood in the bed, or to load a bunch of boxes like you would if you were helping a friend move across town. You know, the kind of stuff people actually do with their small trucks. That would show how much the wheel wells on most trucks really screw up the utility of the bed, and how much better the Ridgeline's bed is by comparison.
 

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That would show how much the wheel wells on most trucks really screw up the utility of the bed, and how much better the Ridgeline's bed is by comparison.
AMEN
 

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I've seen many spares on the underside of trucks that were eventually rendered useless because their cable drop mechanism was frozen up with rust. Most folks just don't maintain something like that. OTOH, more and more mfrs are pushing for carrying a can of "fix-a-flat". You can carry that and still have a workable spare in the Ridge.

I wish reviewers would comment more on overall driving aspects like visibility, maneuverability, parking, and driving down a slick patchy highway.

I'm glad Nathan pointed out the ability to reach into the bed.
And there's the risk of theft so you need an extra chain and lock, but lots of low-life's have bolt cutters now, and the lock gets full of road crud so you need to keep that covered.
 

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You just can not please 100% of the people 100% of the time.

As for me, I’ll just keep driving my Ridgeline and have a smile on my face.

Oh & BTW, in the 13 years I drove my Frontier the spare never touched the ground!
 
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And there's the risk of theft so you need an extra chain and lock, but lots of low-life's have bolt cutters now, and the lock gets full of road crud so you need to keep that covered.
I'm sure it's happened but in my 69 years on this planet, I have yet to hear of someone's spare being stolen. I used to have a 3/4 ton chevy with split rims and I carried the spare in the bed unsecured. No one stole that and to be honest I didn't want it either.
 

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My comments to them:
And Nathan, his personality, is completely different than mine so I can't stand him. He needs another burger like a crackhead needs another hit.
The chubby guy hated it from the get-go in the typical truck-snob way.

He says the bed capacity is 1700 lbs, and then out of the same mouth he says it's not a truck and for people who "put stuff in the back every once in a while". Is there a limit on how much or how often you can "put stuff in the back"? Well yes, it's 1700 lbs, and dude, there's no limit to how often you can do that....aka just like every Tacoma, Ranger, Gladiator and Canyon!!

They're both "quiet" trucks, but in that segment there was a "tell" about the bias. They said the Ridgeline noise level was "around 63", though naturally it bounced a little under and over that, but in the Ranger it bottomed out at 61 and the guy goes "61, it's better".

Later one of them said the Ranger a little better bed capacity - even though they just quoted both at 1700 lbs. - and of course emphasized its larger towing capacity (which is fair), but don't think they mentioned the Ranger's prominent rear-wheel humps that encroach the bed space.

Whether someone likes the thing or not is entirely up to them - no quarrel from me - but don't declare nonsense as truth. That's not "reviewing" a vehicle; it's simply expressing your personal bias. So disingenuous.
 

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Same people that are concerned about spare tire theft........might also be concern about tail gate theft. Move to a better neighborhood ????????
 

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My two cents (2019 RTL-T):

Ridgeline is a better vehicle that Ranger or Tacoma in pretty much all the categories other than price. And as for pricing, down the road it'll likely be cheaper than the Ford and on par with the Tacoma.

Far more comfortable, better drivability, easier to park, and the bed is far more functional with better access.

The only complaint which is really not a complaint but a wonder is why the Ridgeline doesn't have dual exhausts on it's 3.5L?
 

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Why didn't they mention the "perk" of getting to visit your mechanics more frequently with the Ranger? Also, I loved the Gen 1 photo bomb at 21:07!
Consumer Reports surveys show the new Ranger has been more reliable than the Ridgeline so far. Maybe the only thing it has going for it.
 

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The Ridgeline has a full frame that runs from the front to the rear just like any other truck. The difference is that the Ridgeline's is welded to its body rather than bolted to it.
Unless the 2020 is different underneath than all the other Ridgelines, otherwise you are wrong. I just looked under my 2019 RTL-E and it does not have a "full frame that runs from the front to the rear just like any other truck". My old 1983 Suburban did, but not on the Ridgeline. Don't make me take pictures to prove it.
 

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Unless the 2020 is different underneath than all the other Ridgelines, otherwise you are wrong. I just looked under my 2019 RTL-E and it does not have a "full frame that runs from the front to the rear just like any other truck". My old 1983 Suburban did, but not on the Ridgeline. Don't make me take pictures to prove it.
“From the front of this vehicle to the back, we have framerails, just like any other truck would have,” says Kerry McClure, Honda chief engineer for the Ridgeline. “The body itself—instead of being bolted onto that framerail structure—is integrated so the floor panel sits on top of it and it is all welded together.”


The same information applies to the 2018-2020 as well.
 

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Same people that are concerned about spare tire theft........might also be concern about tail gate theft. Move to a better neighborhood ????????
I park in my garage at home, but I'm concerned about when I travel so I kept a lock on the spare tires under my old Chevy's. Maybe not needed, but no way to know
 
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