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Discussion Starter #1
Wondering what your all’s thoughts are on using a can of fuel additive Sea Foam periodically in a new vehicle to keep carbon buildup to a minimum. I used to run it through my 2008 Civic religiously( 160k mikes). I was wondering if any of you all use it on new engines as a consistent cleaning agent or is this just a waste of time and money?
 

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I didn't think Sea Foam would minimize carbon build up. I use it when I store any gas vehicle or lawn equipment for the winter. I put some in and run it for awhile to get it circulated.
 

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I’d use a bottle of Techron, every time you do an oil change. The other thing with DI engines that is the best, the old Italian tune up. Full throttle through a few gears, wind it out. Good to do on a regular basis. As long as it isn’t all the time you’ll be fine.
 

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Wondering what your all’s thoughts are on using a can of fuel additive Sea Foam periodically in a new vehicle to keep carbon buildup to a minimum. I used to run it through my 2008 Civic religiously( 160k mikes). I was wondering if any of you all use it on new engines as a consistent cleaning agent or is this just a waste of time and money?
Mostly a waste of money. The Ridgeline has a direct-injected engine, so putting Sea Foam (or anything else, for that matter) in your gas tank will not help prevent any carbon buildup on the back of your valves.

You can dump Sea Foam into your air stream via a vacuum line, but you have to be really careful about how much you put in because you could flood the engine or, at worst, hydrolock it.

For how many modern cars are out there at 150k+ miles, I wouldn't bother with in the slightest. Maybe I'd reconsider it in 10 years.
 

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I would put a bottle of the Newer type BG44K Platinum Fuel System Cleaner in the tank.
Depending on your mileage if you got 12,000 miles or more put a can in the tank should be good for next 10,000.
The newer BG44K Platinum is for newer GDI Engines. I have used the older BG44K Fuel Treatment for years with my 00 Acura 3.2 TL Dealer service use to add it at different service intervals I buy it from Acura or Honda dealer but you can order. Read up on it remember the Gen 2 Ridgeline would use the newer Platinum BG44K formulation for GDI type Engines. Not sure if new stuff is like old add to tank when low on gas at full fill-up then try not to take a long highway trip that would burn that tank of gas out soon. You want it to stay in awhile like normal daily driving to give it more time before you re-fuel again.













e3
 
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Discussion Starter #12
I didn't think Sea Foam would minimize carbon build up. I use it when I store any gas vehicle or lawn equipment for the winter. I put some in and run it for awhile to get it circulated.
I think for that purpose Sta-bil might be more up your alley for long term fuel storage. I know Sea foam can also be good for cleaning carb bowls and jets after fuel has sat in them all season long.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Mostly a waste of money. The Ridgeline has a direct-injected engine, so putting Sea Foam (or anything else, for that matter) in your gas tank will not help prevent any carbon buildup on the back of your valves.

You can dump Sea Foam into your air stream via a vacuum line, but you have to be really careful about how much you put in because you could flood the engine or, at worst, hydrolock it.

For how many modern cars are out there at 150k+ miles, I wouldn't bother with in the slightest. Maybe I'd reconsider it in 10 years.
Yeah the old vacuum method was so that the juice wasn’t worth the squeeze, they have a can now that you can spray through the intake which is convenient.
 

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I think it's playing with fire. I'd rather have carbon on the top of the pistons or on the valves, than have it break loose and get down in the rings or the rod bearings. There is no guarantee it will burn or come out the exhaust valves. I wouldn't play around with these if your engine is healthy and not having any problems.

A lot of people get caught up trying to be proactive, but honestly what are the REAL odds you will keep a vehicle to 200k-300k miles? Chances are you'll fancy something else in the next 8 years, or it will be totalled by a minor accident once the book value of the vehicle drops over 10 years.
 

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I once watched at a American Motors dealership service area as a Technician poured water down the carb throat of a AMC while the engine was throttled up to around 2 or 3k rpm. He poured a gallon of water from a bucket into it! He said that was how they decarbonized the insides of the motor since a lot of their customers were senior citizens who drove them slowly and they were seriously carboned up inside. He said he did that to hundreds of them without incident. A gallon ! It was impressive to watch.

Steve
 

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^^^ Getting off-topic, but that does remind me of when water injection was a big thing back in the 70s. You had a reservoir of water under the hood and it would inject water into the engine intake while you drove. The main benefit was that you could run higher compression ratios and advance the timing without suffering from pre-detonation (engine knock). IIRC, a properly set up engine with water injection could get 3-4mpg more than a stock engine, which was huge in those days. But add too much water and you could suffer hydro-lock or blow the engine. I remember it being good for turbo- or supercharged engines, also.

I'd think engineers could build safe and effective computer-controlled water injection systems nowadays, but then drivers would be required to periodically add water, which is a huge no-no in today's world of convenience. Water also adds weight.
 

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^^^ Getting off-topic, but that does remind me of when water injection was a big thing back in the 70s. You had a reservoir of water under the hood and it would inject water into the engine intake while you drove. The main benefit was that you could run higher compression ratios and advance the timing without suffering from pre-detonation (engine knock). IIRC, a properly set up engine with water injection could get 3-4mpg more than a stock engine, which was huge in those days. But too much water, and you could blow the engine.
yep,we had this setup on our 1970s towing rig, it made a significant difference, especially with the Rocky Mountain passes!

Bill
 

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Water injection has been used for a long time with superchargers. The Luftwaffe ran what they called MW50 in WWII, which was a 50/50 mix of ethanol and water sprayed into the supercharger.
 

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Yeah the old vacuum method was so that the juice wasn’t worth the squeeze, they have a can now that you can spray through the intake which is convenient.
Running a can through the vac line on my Jeep Cherokee and Jeep Liberty back in the day was oddly satisfying and equally terrifying at the same time. Whether it ever really made a difference, I have no idea, but the smoke show was impressive.
 

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Wondering what your all’s thoughts are on using a can of fuel additive Sea Foam periodically in a new vehicle to keep carbon buildup to a minimum.
I would review the MSDS for the Sea Foam and then decide to use it or not. I wonder if the Sea Foam formula has changed over the years to account for the change in engine/fuel technology. My personal thoughts are that with the advent of Top Tier fuels there is no need for fuel additives. The fuel additives are already in the Top Tier fuels.
 
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