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The laptop is now listed on eBay. Next Monday, we'll see how much a dead, four year-old MacBook Pro is worth. :)
...and the results are in. It sold for $401.00! The buyer (a computer repair store) paid the instant the auction ended.

It blows my mind that a four year-old, non-functioning laptop is worth that much.
 

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...and the results are in. It sold for $401.00! The buyer (a computer repair store) paid the instant the auction ended.

It blows my mind that a four year-old, non-functioning laptop is worth that much.
this whole thread "blew my mind"................
 

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So my youngest daughter starts college in two weeks. The deal was we would get her a laptop at the beginning of high school and at the beginning of college. She always gets Apple everything but have no idea what to get this time. She has run into storage issues with her current air. Any suggestions, budget $1500. max. Thanks in advance, thought I would ask it here before I start research.
 

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I'd recommend this mid-2019 MacBook Pro 13" for $1,400. I bought the 128 GB version at Best Buy for $1,099 ($1,299 - $100 sale price - $100 student discount) + tax. I don't need a lot of storage on laptop, but it sounds like your daughter may need the 256 GB version.

(https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1492879-REG/apple_muhp2ll_a_13_3_macbook_pro_with.html

If speed is less important than storage, there's this MacBook Air with 512 GB for $1,500.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1492903-REG/apple_z0x1_mvfh_01_bh_13_3_macbook_air_with.html

I use B&H often for free shipping and no tax.
 

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...and the results are in. It sold for $401.00! The buyer (a computer repair store) paid the instant the auction ended.

It blows my mind that a four year-old, non-functioning laptop is worth that much.
Sounds like a good sale, but $ are $. I'm curious.. How much did it cost new? To me that's the bottom line.
 

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Sounds like a good sale, but $ are $. I'm curious.. How much did it cost new? To me that's the bottom line.
I purchased it from B&H in March 2015 for $1,199 (no tax or shipping).

After eBay and PayPal took their cuts and the cost of shipping to the buyer, I ended up with $354.

So, it cost me $854 or $16.42 per month. Had it not been damaged by lightning, it would have sold for around $800 instead of $400.
 

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I purchased it from B&H in March 2015 for $1,199 (no tax or shipping).

After eBay and PayPal took their cuts and the cost of shipping to the buyer, I ended up with $354.

So, it cost me $854 or $16.42 per month. Had it not been damaged by lightning, it would have sold for around $800 instead of $400.
I know quite a few who have taken a bite of the Apple and thoroughly enjoyed it. My son is one of them. He is Apple everything although I think his wife may have bought a PC tablet last year. Myself, I've never seen the logic. I don't deny they have a great OS, but much is proprietary. I don't know the particulars anymore, but my son did run into an update issue with his 4 year Apple laptop a year or two ago...where he was debating the cost of a needed fix/upgrade versus new. ..Certainly not much bang for the buck on that one.

My laptop cost for the 8 year old Dell Inspiron XP machine I retired over 4 years ago still working...was $4.17 per month. My current 4.5 year old $200 Asus machine continues to purr along nicely so I won't know the cost per month till it breaks (currently $3.85) I can't speak to gaming chops for these cheaper machines because I never have been a gamer. The company I used to work for ($900M last year) used all PCs. They were able to crunch anything that needed to be crunched. I'm guessing several 100 machines...maybe more My use consisted of MS Office tools and estimating programs.

I'm no computer guru as I've stated before and it's quite possible that Apple may be a better product, but since 1994 I've found that PCs fulfill anything I need a computer to do at substantially less cost...whether up front or at the end of its life. FTR I do have Job's book on the shelf here. Good read.
 

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I'd recommend this mid-2019 MacBook Pro 13" for $1,400. I bought the 128 GB version at Best Buy for $1,099 ($1,299 - $100 sale price - $100 student discount) + tax. I don't need a lot of storage on laptop, but it sounds like your daughter may need the 256 GB version.

(https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1492879-REG/apple_muhp2ll_a_13_3_macbook_pro_with.html

If speed is less important than storage, there's this MacBook Air with 512 GB for $1,500.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1492903-REG/apple_z0x1_mvfh_01_bh_13_3_macbook_air_with.html

I use B&H often for free shipping and no tax.
Thanks Zroger73, IIRC B&H was a stones throw away from my first real job out of college. Used to go there all the time. I'll visit the Apple store within the next few days.
 

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I know quite a few who have taken a bite of the Apple and thoroughly enjoyed it. My son is one of them. He is Apple everything although I think his wife may have bought a PC tablet last year. Myself, I've never seen the logic. I don't deny they have a great OS, but much is proprietary. I don't know the particulars anymore, but my son did run into an update issue with his 4 year Apple laptop a year or two ago...where he was debating the cost of a needed fix/upgrade versus new. ..Certainly not much bang for the buck on that one.

My laptop cost for the 8 year old Dell Inspiron XP machine I retired over 4 years ago still working...was $4.17 per month. My current 4.5 year old $200 Asus machine continues to purr along nicely so I won't know the cost per month till it breaks (currently $3.85) I can't speak to gaming chops for these cheaper machines because I never have been a gamer. The company I used to work for ($900M last year) used all PCs. They were able to crunch anything that needed to be crunched. I'm guessing several 100 machines...maybe more My use consisted of MS Office tools and estimating programs.

I'm no computer guru as I've stated before and it's quite possible that Apple may be a better product, but since 1994 I've found that PCs fulfill anything I need a computer to do at substantially less cost...whether up front or at the end of its life. FTR I do have Job's book on the shelf here. Good read.
For me, it's the little things Apples does, the consistency of operation, the complete lack of bloatware, the look and feel of the hardware, and the refined interfaces that drew me in and keep me there. I can and do accomplish most of the same things on either platform, but working on my Apple devices at home and my Dell computers at work is like going from my Ridgeline to a Frontier.

The closed, walled, proprietary nature of Apple is a mixed blessing. Upgrades and repairs are difficult to impossible, but at the same time I've found less need to open an Apple device.

My brother recently got a new job and was issued a new Dell laptop for very basic tasks such as emails, spreadsheets, and using cloud-based accounting software to issue purchase orders. When he showed me the solid black, nondescript, plastic laptop, I was certain that it was a basic, $500 device that was suitable for the job and cheap enough to be disposable after a few years. It felt light, hollow, and the chassis flexed when twisted. My jaw hit the floor when he showed me the receipt for the $1,499 purchase!
 

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...and the results are in. It sold for $401.00! The buyer (a computer repair store) paid the instant the auction ended.

It blows my mind that a four year-old, non-functioning laptop is worth that much.
I received an alert from ebay that your item sold. Ebay also reminded me that there are other non-functioning apple laptops available for purchase, should I be so inclined.
 

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For me, it's the little things Apples does, the consistency of operation, the complete lack of bloatware, the look and feel of the hardware, and the refined interfaces that drew me in and keep me there. I can and do accomplish most of the same things on either platform, but working on my Apple devices at home and my Dell computers at work is like going from my Ridgeline to a Frontier.

The closed, walled, proprietary nature of Apple is a mixed blessing. Upgrades and repairs are difficult to impossible, but at the same time I've found less need to open an Apple device.

My brother recently got a new job and was issued a new Dell laptop for very basic tasks such as emails, spreadsheets, and using cloud-based accounting software to issue purchase orders. When he showed me the solid black, nondescript, plastic laptop, I was certain that it was a basic, $500 device that was suitable for the job and cheap enough to be disposable after a few years. It felt light, hollow, and the chassis flexed when twisted. My jaw hit the floor when he showed me the receipt for the $1,499 purchase!
You echo what all who I know with Apples say. I don't the answer or wouldn't ask this, but why is it that most business use the PC model? ...at least in the world I was in. The simple answer would be cost? Seems like a huge market untapped by Apple? For those that work on computers everyday like yourself, I can see how you might prefer the Apple for the reasons listed. However; I would guess the vast majority of personal computer use needs only a simple pc windows based platform. Like Apple phones, the cost just doesn't justify the purchase to me. Jobs was a bit obsessed with aesthetics. You described the lack of such above with your brother's new Dell. Form means little to me. I'd be curious if my $190 ASUS could do your brother's work? It's black and nondescript. Can't say as it flexes much though. It does take a little beating because it's always on trips getting batted around in the vehicles. It is 4.5 years old and works just fine. It's never been touched. The one you sold at the same age was broke. Except for one cooling fan on my 8 year old desktop (I never shut them off), I've never been inside any PC I've owned except to add some memory or additional hard drive space...sometimes for back up.

The bottom line is everybody funnels money the direction they want and/or can afford. Some buy new vehicles all the time. Some buy camps/cottages or 2nd homes. Some buy high dollar hot rods :) And yes many choose to follow the siren song of the Apple. I've saved $1000s over the years by not going that route. ...choosing to spend that money on travel, entertainment, and car stuff. To each his own!
 

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Back in the 90s, Apple was famous for being ideal for graphic design and arts, whereas the PC was known to be better at math calculations. I'm sure those differences have long since vanished, but many companies may still be rooted in that concept. For example, the university i went to had a lot of engineers, so PCs were rampant there, and many of those graduates are now in positions of authority and decision-making within companies. I suppose an arts or media school may have been primarily Apple.
 

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You echo what all who I know with Apples say. I don't the answer or wouldn't ask this, but why is it that most business use the PC model? ...at least in the world I was in. The simple answer would be cost? Seems like a huge market untapped by Apple? For those that work on computers everyday like yourself, I can see how you might prefer the Apple for the reasons listed. However; I would guess the vast majority of personal computer use needs only a simple pc windows based platform. Like Apple phones, the cost just doesn't justify the purchase to me. Jobs was a bit obsessed with aesthetics. You described the lack of such above with your brother's new Dell. Form means little to me. I'd be curious if my $190 ASUS could do your brother's work? It's black and nondescript. Can't say as it flexes much though. It does take a little beating because it's always on trips getting batted around in the vehicles. It is 4.5 years old and works just fine. It's never been touched. The one you sold at the same age was broke. Except for one cooling fan on my 8 year old desktop (I never shut them off), I've never been inside any PC I've owned except to add some memory or additional hard drive space...sometimes for back up.

The bottom line is everybody funnels money the direction they want and/or can afford. Some buy new vehicles all the time. Some buy camps/cottages or 2nd homes. Some buy high dollar hot rods :) And yes many choose to follow the siren song of the Apple. I've saved $1000s over the years by not going that route. ...choosing to spend that money on travel, entertainment, and car stuff. To each his own!
A $100 Chromebook could do my brother's work. Why his employer's IT department chooses $1,500 Dell laptops for this purpose I don't know - one of their relatives probably works for Dell.

I, too, am obsessed with aesthetics and high-quality materials. I don't like looking at or touching laminate countertops. I don't like the look or feel of vinyl flooring. I like devices made from high-grade aluminum, stainless steel, and glass - not plastic. I like to pour my cheap liquor from carved leaded crystal decanters. I like clear, 2" ice cubes made from distilled water instead of milky, moon-shaped cubes from the ice maker. I certainly wasn't raised with any of these things, but my brain just prefers premium products that are as perfect as possible.

I don't believe my MacBook Pro failed on its own - it would be too much of a coincidence that it failed on the same day a rare lightning storm moved through causing a brief power outage.

I can answer why we don't use Macs at work...

Our accounting software (Sage 100), contact management software (GoldMine), the software that communicates with and programs the industrial controls (such as CoDeSys), and our CAD software (SolidWorks) requires Windows. We could run Windows on Apple hardware, but that isn't cost effective - we could use $500 PC laptops with Windows preinstalled or $1,000 MacBooks and pay another $200 for Windows. Sage 100 and GoldMine offer cloud-based versions that will work with any device that has a web browser, but the cost for the cloud-based versions is much higher. I use AutoCAD often and for a period it was not available on a Mac, although they brought it back a few years ago now that the market share of Macs has grown.

For creative professionals doing photo, video, and audio editing and graphics work, Macs have an advantage.
 

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US tax laws make buying the $1500 Dells a good choice. After 3 years 90% of the cost is removed from the tax burden. Especially if they are leased it is 100%.

As for Apple Computers - they like Dell, HP, Levono and others are all make by Selectron, Foxcomm, of Acer.

Not a single maker other than Samsung, has the cost advantage to buy the cpu insertion chip device and still be conpetitive in price - HP saves $800 per PC by outsourcing - as do Dell, Apple more than $1100 per PC. Each new CPU requires a $13,000,000 insertion machine.

I worked for NCR when we were forced to go Selectron as we had a $3000 disadvantage on HP and Dell because we sold fewer PC's.

Before NCR, I worked for a software IP company that developed software for the Apple Lisa. We had to modifiy the Lisa's to have more memory and replace the 68000 CPU with a 68010 CPU to do the work. Apple was not happy about that. (We took the CPU and Memory out of a NeXT computer that was far better than the Lisa.) and Apple canceled the contract after getting Adobe to do the work.

I hated Apple ever since - but I did buy Apple iPod for music - retired after Android phone could do it better.

I have a picture with a guy saying he is being sued by Apple.
He made gold and silver butt plugs and apparently Apple has a patent for expressive thing for A**holes.
 

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I, too, am obsessed with aesthetics and high-quality materials. I don't like looking at or touching laminate countertops. I don't like the look or feel of vinyl flooring. I like devices made from high-grade aluminum, stainless steel, and glass - not plastic. I like to pour my cheap liquor from carved leaded crystal decanters. I like clear, 2" ice cubes made from distilled water instead of milky, moon-shaped cubes from the ice maker. I certainly wasn't raised with any of these things, but my brain just prefers premium products that are as perfect as possible.
We have 22 year old laminate countertops (might replace some day) and what was considered good vinyl flooring from 22 years ago (pretty new then) in our kitchen. No carved leaded crystal decanters here. I make ice cubes with the frig ice maker over which I pour more expensive single malt whisky. On the flip side, I like a little carbon fiber and fiberglass in some of our rolling stock

....and therein lies the rub. :)
 

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I don't the answer or wouldn't ask this, but why is it that most business use the PC model? ...at least in the world I was in. The simple answer would be cost?
Al lot depends on what business you are in.

I've been a professional photographer since 1980 and I've worked with hundreds of graphics designers, photographers, and editors and I don't recall meeting anyone in the visual arts in the past 15-years using a PC.

Web designers I have worked with are almost entirely Apple users, but a handful do use PCs to test their work on different platforms.

Writers and editors in my experience are evenly split Mac/PC. I know a handful of writers who cling to ancient PCs that long since should have been put out to pasture, most of these users are well over 50 and their offices feature towering stacks of paper/books/magazines and they have their own, personal coffee pot and work way too many hours of overtime, even when it's not necessary. :)

I've attended symposiums on about 20 different college campuses from Canada to Florida to Utah and I can't ever remember seeing a PC in any Journalism or Art departments with the possible exception of the secretaries. Most computer labs and campus libraries use Macs as well.

Most other disciplines within college campuses are a mix of Mac and PC, but the trend is definitely moving to more and more Macs. The exception being Business and Accounting schools who often encourage their students to purchase a pre-configured PC laptop from an approved vendor at a pre-set price.

Either platform is capable of doing the work, which makes the most sense is a matter of personal preference and at least partly influenced by your profession.
 

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Good info. Thanks. I see the connection with the photo/visual end. I wonder how large a segment of 'work' that is in the country? Our local school district has about 450-500 machines now.....I believe all PC based. they may have a Mac or two now. They didn't the 8 years I was on the school board. Cost was a big factor. Our local D2 college started issuing all students a Thinkpad back in 2002. I see now they also issue Macs for the art and design majors, but that's a small piece of the 9000 the program serves between students, faculty, and staff.

Your last statement makes very good sense as relates to profession, but there are multitudes who have just bought into the marketing machine for Apple and spent lots of unnecessary money to do things a cheap PC would do just as well for them IMO.
 

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Another reason I like staying in Apple's ecosystem when possible is that the various devices have a propensity to "just work" without needing a computer degree, having to call your child/grandchild for help, or resorting to command prompts and registry settings. Windows and some other devices have improved in this area, but the experience is inconsistent. Having a relatively small hardware selection and tight control over both the hardware and software that runs on it affords Apple the ability to create more stable products.

Apple only has to create operating systems and applications that operate on hardware they designed. Microsoft, by contrast, is burdened with ensuring compatibility with a virtually infinite number of hardware combinations from multiple manufacturers. And, hardware vendors like Dell, Lenovo, Asus, etc. don't make operating systems.

You do give up some compatibility and repairability in exchange for reliability, stability, and design. For me, PC's are relatively inexpensive tools to get the job done while Apple hardware is more satisfying and entertaining to use.
 

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I received an alert from ebay that your item sold. Ebay also reminded me that there are other non-functioning apple laptops available for purchase, should I be so inclined.
My nearly 7 year old 15” non-retina MacBook Pro is still humming along good as new. When this one finally gives up the ghost, I'll look for another gently used MacBook and keep rolling.

395563
 

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Another reason I like staying in Apple's ecosystem when possible is that the various devices have a propensity to "just work" without needing a computer degree, having to call your child/grandchild for help, or resorting to command prompts and registry settings. Windows and some other devices have improved in this area, but the experience is inconsistent. Having a relatively small hardware selection and tight control over both the hardware and software that runs on it affords Apple the ability to create more stable products.

Apple only has to create operating systems and applications that operate on hardware they designed. Microsoft, by contrast, is burdened with ensuring compatibility with a virtually infinite number of hardware combinations from multiple manufacturers. And, hardware vendors like Dell, Lenovo, Asus, etc. don't make operating systems.

You do give up some compatibility and repairability in exchange for reliability, stability, and design. For me, PC's are relatively inexpensive tools to get the job done while Apple hardware is more satisfying and entertaining to use.
I certainly respect your take on pc choices and your reasons why. I'm sure they're valid. But then you aren't an average computer user either

Perhaps I'm the exception, but I've never experienced the issues you refer to above. Everything I learned about working a computer was self taught and sufficient for my needs. (with the exception of key boarding skills) I'm probably missing something here, but Windows is Windows. Doesn't matter the make. They pay MS to run the MS operating system. I've never had an inconsistent experience with the Windows machines I've had, both personal and at work. I've had to use the 'black hole' for commands only a few times and some of that was just experimenting around.

For the heck of it, I just asked my son, the Apple guy, what the company he works for uses. They are pc based... $5 billion dollar international professional services company
 
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