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I recommend getting the timing belt and water pump service done a little short of 100k. My '06 RTS had the service done around 101k and the timing belt tensioner was leaking fluid causing the engine to throw a misfire code under load. And since the whole engine has to basically come out, it's a good time to get other components replaced.
 

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meh,

not all trucks are the same.

Did mine @ around 120,000 the first time and probably going to do this one @ around 240,000 in a couple months.
 

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meh,

not all trucks are the same.

Did mine @ around 120,000 the first time and probably going to do this one @ around 240,000 in a couple months.
In my mind, preventative maintenance should actually be preventative.. just my .02 though
 

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You're close to 240k?? That's great to hear, i'm planning on keeping my Ridge going until the wheels fall off... ok maybe not that long.. how's it treating you?
 

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its all good,


Just passed 220,000, so far so good, probably 95+% of the truck is still running on the parts it had when it came off the assembly line.
 

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I recommend getting the timing belt and water pump service done a little short of 100k. My '06 RTS had the service done around 101k and the timing belt tensioner was leaking fluid causing the engine to throw a misfire code under load. And since the whole engine has to basically come out, it's a good time to get other components replaced.
Although I agree with changing the TB and WP around 100K, it is a gross exagerration to say the whole engine has to come out.

That is simply not true at all. If the engine had to be removed the service would cost at least double what it does.

It is smart to replace the WP at the same time because there is almost no extra labor required. All the parts that must be removed for the WP must be removed for the WP replacement. But the engine remains in the truck.

BTW - we just had this done on our 2006 Pilot - which had 100K miles - for about $750 at an independent garage. They changed the TB, WP, main drive belt, and the tensioner. One dealer wanted about that much w/o the tensioner and another dealer wanted $1050 including the tensioner.
 

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BTW - the TB is a must-do service when due.

This engine, like almost all Honda engines, is an interference design. That means the valves could collide with the piston if camshaft timing is lost (as when the timing belt breaks). If valve collision occurs - the engine damage will be significant (valves, rocker arms, VTEC mechanism, etc.) and very expensive.
 

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BTW - the TB is a must-do service when due.

This engine, like almost all Honda engines, is an interference design. That means the valves could collide with the piston if camshaft timing is lost (as when the timing belt breaks). If valve collision occurs - the engine damage will be significant (valves, rocker arms, VTEC mechanism, etc.) and very expensive.
I recall pricing out what it would cost - a bare head casting was about $400 (there's 2 of them in the RL). Pistons were around $80 each, and valves were $15-28, depending. Add in gaskets & seals. This is assuming the cams & bearings are still good, and that the crank & it's bearings weren't affected. Add lots of labor on top of that.

You really don't want to gamble with a broken timing belt.

Chip H.
 

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I love my ridgeline but I didn't research the engine enough before buying it. Had I known it had a timing belt, I would of probably bought a Tundra or kept driving my element. I think using a timing belt on an interference engine is just a bad idea. I have had timing belts break on other cars (domestic's) and I'm hoping the Honda's timing belt is better then what Ford and Chevy have used in the past, but at least those cars didn't have interference engine's. I'll be changing mine at the 80k mark. My friends Kia Reo lost the timing belt at 80k and she had to fight with Kia to get them to replace the engine.
 

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Just changed mine at 100k... I asked for the old parts to see how they looked and they did not show any visable wear?;act028:hummm
 

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I'm at about 83,000 miles right now on my '07. This is the one service I'm totally dreading to have done. I put about 15-18k miles on my truck a year, so I'm looking at about another year before I'll need to get this done. Just so I get everything straight, I need to replace the timing belt, the water pump, the hydraulic tensioner pulley, and have all the seals and gaskets replaced for said parts? I will probably replace the spark plugs at that time, but I can do that myself.

Additionally, I'm really up in the air about whether I should have my dealer do the work or just have my local indy mechanic do it. I trust my local mechanic because he's exceptionally fair on his prices and he really knows what he's doing. It's hard to find a good local mechanic anymore. Then again, I don't know if he's ever even worked on a Ridgeline this far in depth. I know for a fact the work will be done correctly at my dealer, but the job will most likely be well over $1000. After buying the parts separately, I'd probably have $600-700 or so in it for my local guy to do it. What do you guys think is better to do?
 

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Add the valve adjustment. It's all in the manual. :act030: I plan on getting quotes from the dealer and an independent. The J35 has been around long enough for the indies to know it well.
 

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Has anyone done this service themselves? Maybe a tutorial is in order? I know it wouldn't be for the faint of heart, but many of us, have been that deep into a motor before... I've done head gaskets on quad fours, and heads on bugs, etc... I could do it, though it would take me probably a whole weekend. I don't work as fast as I used to. Are there any good service manuals for the Riidge?

--Raymond
 

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I hope to do mine in late September. I will take a lot of pictures and I can put together a slide show like some of the others. If anybody is interested, I'm going to need a coach on that one.

I've got a timing chain to replace on the Q45 before I start the Ridgeline.
 

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Biggest piece of advice I can give.... Pull it thru a couple of gentle revelotions by hand after you have the belt on, to make sure the valves don't make new friends with the pistons then double check the timing marks again. You don't want to have to do the job twice or worse yet, have to order a new engine from Honda of America. Again, I really wish Honda had used a chain.

-Ray
 

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Biggest piece of advice I can give.... Pull it thru a couple of gentle revelotions by hand after you have the belt on, to make sure the valves don't make new friends with the pistons then double check the timing marks again. You don't want to have to do the job twice or worse yet, have to order a new engine from Honda of America. Again, I really wish Honda had used a chain.

-Ray
excellent advice; I always did this with my motorbikes when adjusting the valves, which required removal of the cams, which were timed by chain. Much easier to crank over by hand though....
 

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When I say by hand, I mean you will need to use a breaker bar, just be gentle.--Ray
 

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I just finished installing a Water Pump, Hydraulic tension actuator; Camshaft Belt Idler pulley; Camshaft Belt Tensioner; Drive/Serpentine Belt Tensioner and Serpentine Belt. New Plugs too.

I followed the instructions in the Service Manual. Good instructions. I did a couple procedures more than were recommended. I pulled the large black motor mount bracket (three bolts hold it to the fender well. I also pulled the Power Steering Pump and sat it on top of the motor, after disconnecting the hose from the reservoir. Hold the pump up and drain a little of the fluid back into the reservoir before disconnecting the hose.

I used a fair assortment of 3/8 and ½ inch extensions and swivels. You will need both short and long sockets. I used 10 – 19mm sockets. 10 – 14 in 3/8 drive and 13 – 19 in ½ inch drive. A couple torque wrenches (16 ft lbs to 94 ft lbs (94 ft lbs is the lug nut torque). Most of the torque settings are either 33 or 47 ft lbs. Power Steering bolts are 16 ft lbs. You will need a couple new bolts for the idler and Tensioner pulleys. The book says to discard the used ones.

A step stool and a second pair of hands is a big help (or at least the second pair of hands would have been). I also recommend a magnetic extendable retriever for dropped bolts and sockets, etc.

The hardest part was getting the Crankshaft pulley to break free. After several attempts with long breaker bars (broke a couple extensions), electric impact and a air impact, I am ashamed to say, I resorted to putting the breaker bar on the ground and hitting the ignition. (Make sure the plugs are out and you do not want the engine to start. Loudest snap I ever heard, but the bolt was loose. After removing the bolt, the crankshaft pulley came off but pulling on it....no tools required. Careful it is fairly heavy...Don't drop it as it can be easily damaged.

I found this link on the web. It is about replacing a timing belt on an Odyssey, but it has some great pics. Disregard the part about replacing the dipstick seal (older engine). Other than that, the pics are very accurate and much better than the ones I took. http://home.comcast.net/~desmo888/OdyTB.htm

P.S. My Mileage was 109,012.
 

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Friends, take it from an Honda/Acura service director for over 21 years...if you have not done a job like this before, save up your money and have it done by a pro! Get prices from your aftermarket shops and then take it to a dealer and speak to the service manager to see if he can match it. In this day of a tight economy you may be pleasently surprised to find a dealer will match prices just to fill his shop and the actual trained techniaicn will get the same flag-time so he is happy to do it. This job has many pitfalls that can lead to bent valves and a nightmare for the untrained. It has happened in my shop with a technician who has done the job before but failed to be careful enough. I had to have my top tech pull the heads, found several bent valves, and reinstall for the customer at no cost. In the long run leave these jobs to the pros if you are not comfortable with your level of expertise. Check the maintenance minder on the dash for the code ( 4 ), it is computer not by miles but by engine hours storing in the minder computer. Miles are really not relivent. Leave this job to the pros, some things it just does not pay to take chances.
 

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Have to agree with wayneowens54. If you have not done this type/level of work before or if you have the slightest doubt take it to a qualified mechanic and have it done. wayneowens54 gave some good tips on saving money.

Personally I have been doing this kind of DIY work for over 45 years. I am in no way trying to convince someone to try this when it is beyond their skill level. One mistake can cost you a lot more than getting it done right the first time.

Dan
 
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