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Pardon if this topic's been covered to death, but I've read through a number of the threads and came away less-than-clear.

Purchased our 2006 RL pre-owned with 24,000 miles on it. Today it has about 63k. Probably 70% of the miles we've added have included towing a small travel trailer.

No MM-4 has appeared yet, but I'm confused by these differences:

Online Maintenance Minder: "Replace timing belt and inspect water pump: If you drive regularly in very high temperatures (over 110°F, 43°C), or in very low temperatures (under-20°F, 29°C), replace every 60,000 miles (U.S.)/100,000 km (Canada)"

Hard-copy owners manual: "The timing belt should be replaced at the intervals shown in the maintenance minder schedule. Replace the belt at 60,000 miles (U.S.) or 100,000 km (Canada) if you regularly drive your vehicle in one or
more of these conditions: In very high temperatures (over 110°F, 43°C). In very low temperatures (under 20°F, 29°C). Towing a trailer.

I've been reading some people waiting until 100k for the change, but not much on the consensus mileage when towing frequently. Plus, Honda mentions towing in one blurb and makes no mention in another blurb on the same exact timing-belt-topic.

Advice, insight, suggestions . . . all very appreciated!
Thanks!
 

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I'm in a similar situation but I don't tow anything, just know the previous owner towed a small boat. I'm around 63k too and I'll have the timing belt changed in the next few weeks, along with all the fluids, VTM-4, tranny, etc... don't recall what that service is called in the book.

I'd say if you can afford it and plan on keeping the RL for a while, go ahead and change it out. It'll only hurt your wallet. If you leave it in and it becomes a problem, it could become a BIG problem.
 

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If you do replace the TB also replace the water pump at the same time. Saves you $$$ in the long run because it all has to come out anyway to replace the WP later.
 

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Anybody here replace their own timing belt themselves? Could it be done in your own garage with proper tools and a mechanically-inclined person behind said tools?
 

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Anybody here replace their own timing belt themselves? Could it be done in your own garage with proper tools and a mechanically-inclined person behind said tools?
Not on the RL, however my friend and I changed his TB on his Accord, we did it in my garage, as long as you have the proper tools and some mechanical knowledge along with a service manual it's not a big deal.
 

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Is the engine an interference engine?

In other words, if the timing belt breaks will the valves and piston try to occupy the same space at the same time?

-W
 

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There is some good info on odyclub.com on an engine with a great deal in common. If nothing else it should give a good general feel for the job.

I'm not sure if you can read the thread as a guest so here are several of the more informative parts.




"Timing Belt; who here has the cojones to change it themself?"

http://www.odyclub.com/forums/showt...perpage=15&highlight=timing+belt&pagenumber=1


http://home.comcast.net/~desmo888/OdyTB.htm

one member posts:

"I used to work for Acura/ Honda and did t-belts all the time.

Doing a t-belt on the v6 motors yourself on the vans won't be a fun project.

With professional air tools such as snap on or mac. (None of those craftsman or retail sold sets). The full service takes more then a few hours to do.

At the dealer there is a special tool you need to hold the crank pulley while you break loose the nut in the center of the crank.

The breaker bars we used were about 4-5 ft long and we had to raise the vehicle on the lift to do it from below.

If you have a very strong air gun such as a 1inch drive you could possibly break it free.

The crank bolt is tightened to over 250 ft lbs and is ungreased which you should not grease if you put it back on.

Always replace the tensioner and water pump because if either of those go before your next timing belt is due you're going either pay the same amount of labor to have the shop go back in there to replace them.

Which is why dealers always recommend to do it since you're not paying that much more labor and really just for the parts.

Timing belts aren't like your regular belts they don't dry and squeel with age like the belts that run your alternator and accessory or the serpentine belt the newer cars use.

The t-belt may look fine but they are usually rated to last 100k under normal use. When they break there will be no warning. You can chance it and drive it until it breaks I've had people do that on more then one occasion and they've towed their cars in after it snaps.

If the belt does break you'll hope no valves are fully open and that they don't contact the pistons or you'll be looking at an engine tear down if something gets bent. This can happen to engines even if they are not interference heads (meaning valves will touch pistons when open) It's the luck of the draw if you decide to chance it.

You can search on the internet and there are places that sell the tool that fits into the crank pulley and you'll need two large 3/4 breaker bars the longer the better for more leverage.

You will also need to undo the front motor mount and jack up the motor on the passenger side in order to gain access to work on the timing belt.

Good luck to anyone who's going to try to do it themselves. I know when the time comes I'll be doing mine myself but then I have my full mechanics tool set in my garage along with a compressor and the breaker bars.

The dealers /hr charge is ridiculous. For example a dealer, I won't say who but one I know charged 125 an hour but the tech working on your car only gets paid 25-35/ hr to do the work. The only person benefiting from your business is the dealer while the techs have to work their butts off to support their families.

If you don't want to shell out the full service to do the t-belt and tuneup. The best advice would be to do the t-belt and leave the spark plugs and the rest of the tune up service for next time.

Worn plugs will give you poor performance but in most case would last until your next service. A broken t-belt will leave you stranded and with a larger bill if it does any damage to the motor and if the t-belts broken it wouldn't really matter if you had a valve adjustment, spark plugs and all the other things done before since the car wouldn't be running anyways.

Just my 0.02"
 

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good post Schwejo, I know all about the special tools needed and long breaker bars from working on my friends Accord,
 

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Is the engine an interference engine?

In other words, if the timing belt breaks will the valves and piston try to occupy the same space at the same time?

-W
Yes they are interference. Do not let the TB snap!!! If you are unsure go to your dealer and ask. I would say under heavy load such as towing replace it at the 60K interval. Under normal driving conditions 100K is fine. And as other have said DO the waterpump at the same time much cheaper for you in the long run.
 

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I have a 08 RL but the build date was nov. 07 I have recently had a noise coming from the timing belt area I talked to the dealer and he was not aware of any TSB bullitins on the timing belt rubbing on the shroud making a idler noise bearing sound I asked him that when I should replace the timing belt and he said no not on the Ridgelines 100,000km is way to soon that the computer light service light will come on around 170,000km they are not the same as older Hondas I have a 2001 Civic and got it replaced at 120,000km the only reason was because of the age. Has anyone had this procedure done under warranty?

Thanks Herman:act060:
 

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When it comes to timing belts, changing it early is far better than changing it late.

It's the difference between $850 and $2800.

(bare head is $870, valves are $13-$20 each, pistons are $40 each, connecting rods are $117 each. And then there's labor and all the small parts to include...)

Chip H.
 

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Hey guys, I saw something on eBay with a bunch of items listed as part of the timing belt service. I'm about to do this at my friend's shop and am wondering if I should do all of the following:

# timing belt
# water pump with gasket
# timing belt tension adjuster
# timing belt idler bearing
# timing belt tensioner (roller with bracket)
# accessory drive belt

Being that I have a connection with a local Honda dealer for parts, I'll be going all with OEM stuff.
 

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Good start for sure. What about any other shims/seals? While you are at it, change spark plugs? Valve adjustment, if you do, you will need a gasket set also? New coolant? I went with a Goodyear Gatorback for accessory drive belt instead of OEM. Just my preference. Good Luck

Hey guys, I saw something on eBay with a bunch of items listed as part of the timing belt service. I'm about to do this at my friend's shop and am wondering if I should do all of the following:

# timing belt
# water pump with gasket
# timing belt tension adjuster
# timing belt idler bearing
# timing belt tensioner (roller with bracket)
# accessory drive belt

Being that I have a connection with a local Honda dealer for parts, I'll be going all with OEM stuff.
 

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Well yes I do plan to do all the fluids, spark plugs have already been changed, do the valves need to be adjusted is the another question. I talked to my friend who owns the shop and he wasn't sure. There are some seals there too, but I've heard if they don't leak don't change them cause then they will be prone to leaks.
 

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The valve adjustment question is a good one. How long to you plan on keeping the truck? I debated this for a while also. I plan on running 200K on this motor, so I went ahead and did it.
 

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The valve adjustment question is a good one. How long to you plan on keeping the truck? I debated this for a while also. I plan on running 200K on this motor, so I went ahead and did it.
Yeah I think I'll be keeping it as well. Although the thought has crossed my mind to trade it in for an 09/10 RTL...
 

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I just did the timing belt, timing belt tension and idler, waterpump, drivebelt replacement last weekend. Its a big job, but can be done in the driveway with hand tools. Also, have two gallons of the blue Honda type 2 coolant on hand.

Special tools required:
A) Crankshaft pulley removal tool. ($35 at Canadian Tire.) and two 1/2 breaker bars, lots of 1/2 extensions and cheater-bar pipe for the breaker bar. The pulley bolt is held on so tight I don't believe you could remove it with an impact wrench, and there's no way I would try the starter motor trick seen on the web.
B) 1mm diameter wire to hold the hydraulic tensioner in the compressed position. A hydraulic press is not required. It can be compressed in a large vice.
C) Nimble fingers and thin forearms. Removing and installing all the timing bolt cover bolts it tricky and you need to thread your arms under the A/C plumbing and work by touch alone.
D) Extra plastic inner fender shield and splash panel fasteners. Several will break. Some will probably already be missing.
E) Black cable ties. To temporarily hold plastic shield installed because you ran out of the panel fasteners in (D)
F) 3/8" torque wrench. Not enough room for a 1/2" torque wrench.
G) Big drain plan. When the water pump breaks loose, blue coolant gushes out even if the radiator is drained.
H) Of course, have a Honda manual. Lots of parts interlock and must be removed and installed in a specific order.

Tips to make it easier.
1) Buy a real Honda water pump. The NAPA water pump I bought cracked when installing the timing belt tensioner bolt(mounts directly to the water pump). At least NAPA gave me all my money back.
2) Leave the battery connected to avoid losing the radio and to avoid the cam shaft position re-teaching step at the end.
3) Pull the power steering reservoir out of its mount. No need to drain it, but being able to move it around provides more clearance.
4) Remove the drive belt tensioner after removing the drive belt to make it easier to get at the other bolts.
5) When the Honda manual says to remove the top part of the motor mount, also remove the rest of the engine mount attached to the body. Again, it makes it easier to get at other bolts.
6) As per the manual, when you have the timing belt installed and released the hydrautic tensioner, turn over the engine several times by hand to make sure nothing goes "clunk" and that the timing marks still line up.

Good luck.
 

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PS. If you are draining the radiator and replacing the water pump two jugs of Honda coolant are just barely enough. After doing the top up after cycling the engine a few times the remainder of the second jug just brings the reservoir a sneeze above 'min'.

Bruce
 
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