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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just took the '07 Ridgeline (bought 11/06) in for B1 service at 65k miles (garaged at all times).

Dealer recommends timing belt because of age of vehicle. I would think this would be based on number of miles, but what do I know. Thoughts?

Also, repair quote is for $1245 for timing belt, water pump, tensioner, and drive belt. That sounds a bit steep as I can see the same kit (granted it isn't OEM) for $290. If I decide to do it, should I think about doing it myself or shopping around for a local garage..or just let the dealer do it?

Thanks.
 

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I would not worry about a timing belt change at 65k. I just had mine done (timing belt, water pump, tensioners and spark plugs) at 125k. Recommended factory interval for this is around 105,000 miles. My water pump looked new....and my timing belt looked new...no cracks, and no damage at all. I will upload some pictures. I've owned mine since new (2007), and it's been garaged...not sure if that affects anything. At 65k...I would definitely save your money for now, and don't do it at the dealer unless you want to pay a premium.
 

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If OP is in Canada, he/she might be thinking it's necessary (it's NOT unless you are regularly subject to ultra cold temps), given OM & dealer guidance for Canadian models.
In any case, you CAN get OEM source parts for around that price. If/when you're serious, check (search) threads here on the forum .... several posts detail the parts & sources. If you have someone else do it, you should easily get away for under $800 complete. Many achieve much less (check recent thread on dealer coupons for this).
Lastly, I have to say that after all these years reading about & doing my own TB service, I'm starting to question the validity of the Water Pump change as a routine inclusion in this major maintenance service. I'm not sure I've ever read of a WP failure (maybe once?), and given the long coolant life, together with modern technology, I'm thinking that WP on 2nd TB (210K miles) would probably work out more than fine.... 'just thinking out loud here. Can anyone give other justification for WP R&R after 105K miles OTHER than the expensive labor avoidance should it fail farther down the line? (conventional logic)
It seems to me that, like many other modern automotive components, water pumps used to fail sooner, but now seem to just go & go... especially with well maintained radiator/coolant. What say ye all?
 

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I had my timing belt and water pump changed at 110k miles and I have an 06. I believe unless you're towing, waiting until the 105k mark is the better option. As far as the age of the timing belt, I would be a bit skeptical about that. Price-wise, that is pretty high. I think mine was $1100 with tax, but I also had something else done to the vehicle but can't remember what it was.
 

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There are some dealers doing specials on the timing belt service for $500-$600 (parts included) $1200 is stupidly high. I personally wouldn't bother with the TB service until the mileage hits.
 

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I did the timing belt last weekend, took me about 5 hours total (taking my time) with radiator flush and water pump swap. I purchased the TB with the pulleys and the water pump from rock auto for about $93 bucks ....Gates brand. Then purchased the hydraulic tensioner from advanced auto with a 30% off coupon, I think it cost me around $40-50 bucks. I'm very familiar with working on this engine so it may take somebody else longer.

It's an every 105,000 mile job, my truck is on it's third belt.(Changed at 134k and 191k).

The job is tedious but nothing out of the realm of most ppl who fiddle with cars.

I will say that taking off the crank pulley is a total B#$%^. I've done three of these timing belts on different cars and every time it's a mess. I have a 60 gallon air compressor and a decent impact and still can't get it off. I end up using a breaker bar with a 3 foot pipe on it and then I pray it doesn't let loose and break my face. I rent the crank pulley holder tool from O'Reilleys

Good Luck, sure glad I haven't had to pay somebody else a grand to do this when the parts are less than $200.
 

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Darn sure wouldn't even consider doing it at 65,000. Dealer did mine at 175,000. Replaced tensioner pump etc, cost $700. Time has no effect on these parts, in my opinion.
Just drive and enjoy.

Good luck
 

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to OP - Litewait:

I just had mine done at 88K miles, 2006 RTL. I was planning to do the Timing Belt job myself this spring when temperatures would be warmer in the garage or driveway where the work would be done but an antifreeze leak this winter decided for me when this job had to be done. My water pump did fail at 88K miles, truck never towed anything, appears to have been well taken care of by previous owner but I have no idea if antifreeze was ever changed in first 80K miles.

If you do it yourself, there is really only one special tool you will need for the crank nut. I have it, never used, would sell to you for 1/2 price if you want it. There are a couple of good videos on youtube that will help prepare you for the job. One is by a guy named “cuptain” and he does it on a Ridgeline. He does not show the process/technique of loosening/removing crank nut manually. I think he just used an air wrench. Eric the car guy, on youtube, has a video you can purchase doing the same job on a Honda V-tech Accord. I think it was about $20 or $30 to purchase, it is helpful if you have never done a timing belt and worth the investment. There is another video on youtube showing the crank nut removal setup using breaker bars and ratchet extensions, resting on a jack stand set up close to the wheel providing support for the horizontal extension and allowing space to apply A LOT of leverage force to crack it loose. That seems to be the “muscle” part of the job. The “thinking/special attention” part of the job is getting the timing belt put back on properly so you don’t end up bending valves when you start the motor back up after the job is done. Make sure you understand this completely and how you achieve “proper” installation before getting into this job. The rest of the job appears to be the “tedious/scraped knuckles/cussing” part of the job that involves the systematic removal of all the parts, in very tight spaces, to get down to the timing belt and water pump, and then putting everything back together with the new parts. I personally would have budgeted a few days to do the job and would have been sure to have all the parts and my playbook on sequential steps before starting. The crank nut removal has the potential to be a show stopper. If you can’t get this off, then you can’t do the job period and you will have to take it to a professional. You can skip some steps in the “normal” process of the job flow to find out if this will "stop your show" or not.

Parts: I studied the parts packages available on Amazon and Ebay. It is hard to compare prices without looking very closely.
The packages vary in several ways.
First: there is not a “standard” package of parts for the job other than the timing belt itself and a tensioner. From there you will find all sorts of combinations of additional parts that are part of each package but even their most complete packages are not as complete as the package I ended up putting together from info on this forum so be sure to educate yourself on what makes up the most complete way to do this job and then decide what items you think you can eliminate to save $$ based on your new knowledge, what you can afford to spend today and how long you think you will own the truck.
Second: the terms OEM, Factory, Original replacement parts are used very loosely and they may not mean Original Factory Honda Parts with a Honda Part number on them in a Honda Box or in other words, the parts a dealer would use if doing the job. Some of the packages have pictures of the parts where you see some in Honda Factory packaging (maybe the cheaper ones) and then other parts in the picture you assume are also Original Factory Honda Parts but they are not. Some of the Original Factory Honda parts are made by 3rd party vendors. You will see parts that look identical to the part you would get at the dealer, made by the “correct” vendor but with a different part #, made for a different model or brand but it physically fits the Ridgeline. You will get a variety of opinions on this forum regarding the value of using the parts you find in these internet packages versus using the parts a Honda Dealer would use if they did the job. Once again you have to decide what the value is, if any, of using the parts the dealer would use and paying more or using these “other” parts that are much cheaper and may or may not be as good from a quality and longevity standpoint. The other consideration, if you are still under any kind of warranty is, how will the use and subsequent failure of a non-honda part effect your warranty if it is related to another engine part failure that a warranty administrator can correlate with the non-honda internet part you used.
Third: Your other option is to get the parts or the pricing of those parts from a Honda dealer over the internet. I used Majestic Honda Parts. You will save between 50% and 30% off the dealer list price if you go this route and get Honda packaged parts. This brings the pricing gap between the Honda Dealer packaged parts and the internet parts much closer. At a $350 difference between Honda part versus Internet part you may decide one way and at a $150 difference you may decide another way. If you are doing the job yourself, check pricing at Bernadi, Majestic, etc… and order them. You may be able to negotiate shipping prices that are based on a percentage of total sales as opposed to actual weight and volume. If you have the Honda dealer do the job, bring him a print out of the part numbers and pricing you can get on the internet and ask if they will meet those prices. My dealer did meet those prices and I saved hundreds of dollars on my job because of it. I have also used this technique when buying any Honda parts directly from the parts counter window at the dealership. Look up internet pricing from a Honda Dealer who sells parts online. Print out the list (your on-line order summary before clicking the final commitment button) showing the seller, their address and phone #, the part # and the price and bring this in as proof for what you can buy these parts at, the dealer at this point should meet the pricing.

The basic timing belt, water pump, tensioner package at my local Honda Dealer was $890 parts and labor + tax and supplies etc…at a $96/hr labor rate. Most dlrs will have about the same number of labor hours calculated into their price and the major differences will be based on labor rate or other add-ons. Without knowing exactly what each dealer does (labor) and the completeness regarding parts in their package, it is pretty hard to just compare final price between dealers or independents. I showed my local dealer some ridiculously low priced coupons I printed off this forum (they were very old pricing specials…loss leaders…to get your car in the shop so they could then find all sorts of other things that needed to be done to bring the final price up to where it should be) and my dealer just laughed at them saying No Way…and he was right. I think one of them was a timing belt replacement for $350 and that was the only part replaced. These are outliers (if even real) and your dealer will not fall for it so I wouldn’t waste your time trying to get this kind of deal.

If you can somehow swing it, plan to do the water pump at the same time as the timing belt. If doing yourself, at least have the part in hand (with receipt) so after you see how much effort it took to get to the point where you can easily remove the 5 bolts holding the old pump in, you will be in a better position to re-assess the cost-benefit analysis of replacing now or not, and returning for refund the unused water pump you purchased “just in case”.

I have made comments on a number of threads regarding this topic so if you don’t find the details you are looking for with a search using “timing belt” and "water pump replacement”, click on my username at the top left of this entry and then choose “threads I have made” to see my comments or to get to the relevant thread and start from the beginning and start reading. I spent many hours reading and preparing for this job because I really thought I would be doing it myself and it would have been my first timing belt replacement. I hope some of what I learned along the way helps you with your decisions. We are all at a different level regarding cash flow, time available, back up vehicle, workshop/garage/driveway, tool box, knowledge, experience, and comfort level so you need to do what’s right for you regarding preparation for the job and deciding on who to get the parts from or who you pay to do the job. Good luck, hope it all works out well for you and let us know what you ended up doing.
 

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The standard deal at Anderson Honda in Maryland for $490 + $80ish for the tensioner + tax is their actual price for the COMPLETE TB / WP service. There is really no mystery about the service and it is most certainly possible to do comparison shopping. I'm sure they will do their best to find all the other things wrong with the truck but one obviously needs to use ones own brain and judgement. Looking for every possible thing to fix will be a universal pretty much regardless of what dealer you take it to and what price you are paying for the TB/WP service. Some dealers may be willing to match prices and others may not. Alot of dealers will try and charge ridiculously stupid money for the service. Bottom line is you should do a bit of shopping and take the time to know the names and costs of the OEM parts and have a sense of about how much time is standard for the service.

I personally will be going up to Anderson next week with a coupon and have the full TB / WP / TB tensioner service done for about $500 including tax. For that price there really is no point in doing it myself.

I also don't see that there is any question that one should replace the water pump at the same time. TB replacement at 105k is a OEM specced preventative maintenance type service. The water pump replacement is the same. Why would one follow Honda's guidelines on one but not the other?
 

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The standard deal at Anderson Honda in Maryland for $490 + $80ish for the tensioner + tax is their actual price for the COMPLETE TB / WP service. There is really no mystery about the service and it is most certainly possible to do comparison shopping. I'm sure they will do their best to find all the other things wrong with the truck but one obviously needs to use ones own brain and judgement. Looking for every possible thing to fix will be a universal pretty much regardless of what dealer you take it to and what price you are paying for the TB/WP service. Some dealers may be willing to match prices and others may not. Alot of dealers will try and charge ridiculously stupid money for the service. Bottom line is you should do a bit of shopping and take the time to know the names and costs of the OEM parts and have a sense of about how much time is standard for the service.

I personally will be going up to Anderson next week with a coupon and have the full TB / WP / TB tensioner service done for about $500 including tax. For that price there really is no point in doing it myself.

I also don't see that there is any question that one should replace the water pump at the same time. TB replacement at 105k is a OEM specced preventative maintenance type service. The water pump replacement is the same. Why would one follow Honda's guidelines on one but not the other?
Not to beat a dead horse, but the "question" as to the WP was made (by me) simply given the nature of the item. It's not really a wear item, for which R&R intervals are usually reserved. My suspicion/suggestion is that it is only listed for this service due to it's location and the logic of replacing it "while you're in there". You don't see R&R intervals listed for oil pump, fuel pump, alternator, starter, or other non wear items. My thought was only speculative as to whether it really was that effective of a risk mitigator, given I had not really seen many reports of WP failure. Your experience of WP failure @ 88K miles sheds some additional light on that conversation, but I still wonder whether typical failure point might be north of 200K miles. Just a point to ponder .... thinking out loud so to speak. I certainly would not 'skip' the replacement w/o some further research into probable (statistical) forecast for failure of WP. Just wondered if there were any educated opinions on that point. It is worth noting that (to my knowledge) engines that don't have the water pump under the TB cover don't typically have an R&R interval prescribed (am I wrong here). That included older Hondas ('70s Civics/Accord engines for example).
 

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Eurban, I think we agree that the more you know about the job and the parts involved, the better decision you will be able to make regarding the value you are getting compared to other deals out there. If you are taking it somewhere to be done, you are obviously limited to the dealers or independents close by. The further out you go the more you start adding to the bottom line. For me, to take my Ridgeline from Ohio to Maryland to get the work done would not make economic sense.

I believe the labor on this job billed by most dealers is right around 4 hours. A very experienced tech can probably do it in three, especially if the truck is already on the lift for other billable work. It might take a new tech, first time through 5 hours to do it so that’s how they come up with something in the middle, about 4 hours to bill the customer. Warranty labor gets paid by the factory and there is a warranty time out there for this repair that is significantly less than the time they quote the customer to do the work. I don’t know what it is but I’d guess it’s around 3 hrs. Warranty time is the NO B.S. time it takes to do the job. Techs frequently do not like it because there is no time built into for for B.S. interruptions of work or Legitimate interruptions. If you are having more than the standard parts replaced then there might be a tiny bit more charge in labor and of course the part charges will add to the bottom line of the work invoice.

On my invoice, the dollar amount for labor reflected 4 hours at their labor rate of $96/hr. If I add the labor, plus discounted pricing on parts (from Majestic) which I got, on the WP $163/$109, Belt $68/$45 and tensioner $140/$95, I get a total of $633 (384 + 109 + 45 + 95). If I use $90 for the tensioner which is the price stated in the Anderson Ad online instead of $80ish, the Anderson deal for the same parts and labor is $580 (490 + 90) which is a little less than a 10% savings over what I paid.

The Anderson deal in Maryland sited above is definitely a good deal. Assuming a labor rate in the high $90’s, I think anyone can get close to that (within 10%) if you go into it well informed on parts pricing. It appears that Anderson is giving a 35% or more discount on the parts pricing right up front based on the Tensioner example of $90 compared to the list price my dealer shows for that part ($140).

Hopefully Eurban will attach a copy of his invoice when the job is completed to see what/if there are any extras on the bill like Antifreeze and ??? Either way, I’d say this is definitely a very good deal and kudos to Anderson Honda for doing this job at this price, before any negotiations. I would bet they pull in a lot of customers outside their dealer assigned territory and turn them into regular service customers and possibly new car customers with this enticing pricing on the timing belt job. I’ll have to check their other specials/coupons to see if they too are significantly better than what my dealer offers.

Dnick - I agree with your interpretation on the preemptive replacement of the water pump just because your are "there" already. I think water pump failures during the life of a high mileage car are rare. I've never had one in my almost 60 years until this one last month and I've had plenty of high mileage cars. But, since almost everyone does replace the water pump at the suggested interval, the data is skewed already as to frequency and mileage at which water pumps wear out or fail.
 

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.............
Dnick - I agree with your interpretation on the preemptive replacement of the water pump just because your are "there" already. I think water pump failures during the life of a high mileage car are rare. I've never had one in my almost 60 years until this one last month and I've had plenty of high mileage cars. But, since almost everyone does replace the water pump at the suggested interval, the data is skewed already as to frequency and mileage at which water pumps wear out or fail.
Agreed. Which unfortunately makes forming an intelligent decision to assume that risk rather difficult to make.
 

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Eurban, I think we agree that the more you know about the job and the parts involved, the better decision you will be able to make regarding the value you are getting compared to other deals out there. If you are taking it somewhere to be done, you are obviously limited to the dealers or independents close by. The further out you go the more you start adding to the bottom line. For me, to take my Ridgeline from Ohio to Maryland to get the work done would not make economic sense.

I believe the labor on this job billed by most dealers is right around 4 hours. A very experienced tech can probably do it in three, especially if the truck is already on the lift for other billable work. It might take a new tech, first time through 5 hours to do it so that’s how they come up with something in the middle, about 4 hours to bill the customer. Warranty labor gets paid by the factory and there is a warranty time out there for this repair that is significantly less than the time they quote the customer to do the work. I don’t know what it is but I’d guess it’s around 3 hrs. Warranty time is the NO B.S. time it takes to do the job. Techs frequently do not like it because there is no time built into for for B.S. interruptions of work or Legitimate interruptions. If you are having more than the standard parts replaced then there might be a tiny bit more charge in labor and of course the part charges will add to the bottom line of the work invoice.

On my invoice, the dollar amount for labor reflected 4 hours at their labor rate of $96/hr. If I add the labor, plus discounted pricing on parts (from Majestic) which I got, on the WP $163/$109, Belt $68/$45 and tensioner $140/$95, I get a total of $633 (384 + 109 + 45 + 95). If I use $90 for the tensioner which is the price stated in the Anderson Ad online instead of $80ish, the Anderson deal for the same parts and labor is $580 (490 + 90) which is a little less than a 10% savings over what I paid.

The Anderson deal in Maryland sited above is definitely a good deal. Assuming a labor rate in the high $90’s, I think anyone can get close to that (within 10%) if you go into it well informed on parts pricing. It appears that Anderson is giving a 35% or more discount on the parts pricing right up front based on the Tensioner example of $90 compared to the list price my dealer shows for that part ($140).

Hopefully Eurban will attach a copy of his invoice when the job is completed to see what/if there are any extras on the bill like Antifreeze and ??? Either way, I’d say this is definitely a very good deal and kudos to Anderson Honda for doing this job at this price, before any negotiations. I would bet they pull in a lot of customers outside their dealer assigned territory and turn them into regular service customers and possibly new car customers with this enticing pricing on the timing belt job. I’ll have to check their other specials/coupons to see if they too are significantly better than what my dealer offers.

Dnick - I agree with your interpretation on the preemptive replacement of the water pump just because your are "there" already. I think water pump failures during the life of a high mileage car are rare. I've never had one in my almost 60 years until this one last month and I've had plenty of high mileage cars. But, since almost everyone does replace the water pump at the suggested interval, the data is skewed already as to frequency and mileage at which water pumps wear out or fail.
All things necessary to do the complete job are included. Antifreeze is included. I can include my invoice upon completion.

Reports on this forum of an OEM timing belt breaking are slim to none. Plenty of reports of people holding off to the upper 100ks and beyond without breakage. I have actually seen more in reports of leaks from around the waterpump. . . Certainly a timing belt breakage will devour your top end while a water pump failure might (or might not) end with no engine damage. Both are pretty undesirable . . .Why gamble on the pump but not the belt? Don't see much logic in it personally.
 

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All things necessary to do the complete job are included. Antifreeze is included. I can include my invoice upon completion.

Reports on this forum of an OEM timing belt breaking are slim to none. Plenty of reports of people holding off to the upper 100ks and beyond without breakage. I have actually seen more in reports of leaks from around the waterpump. . . Certainly a timing belt breakage will devour your top end while a water pump failure might (or might not) end with no engine damage. Both are pretty undesirable . . .Why gamble on the pump but not the belt? Don't see much logic in it personally.
That's an easy answer.... TB failure has high risk consequences, WP failure simply does not. On top of that, TB failure is almost always instantaneous, while WP failure almost always is not (usually a leak or bearing squeal precedes any catastrophic seizure type event that might take TB with it). I'm not advocating.... just pointing out.
 

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Just make sure you replace more than just the belt.....don't do what this guy did.

http://youtu.be/JVj2Cy9gJ1E

Do the idlers and tensioner as well. WP may be optional but not the other things.
Agree 100% .... that guy was lucky he only had bent valves. Tensioner is a MUST.... and idler wheels too... they don't cost that much, and come together in most kits anyway. All NEW stuff for that belt!

I must say that he (the guy in the video) had an engine with a tensioner that had to be "set".... fortunately for us, ours is preset hydraulic & "floating". Still, it is the weak link after the belt itself, given the potential for hydraulic leak/failure.
 

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At 135,000 miles I finally replaced my timing belt, tensioner and water pump along with the other belt. total parts and labour before tax was $900 at the local dealership. Now I am good until I replace her in a few years?
 

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Just had my Timing belt,water pump,tensioner,bearings,sparkplugs and serpentine belt changed on Saturday morning.Timing kit was $157.00(rock auto)plugs and serpentine belt
plugs were $18.00 each and belt was 44.00(sourced locally)Ihad to drive to Fort Mcmurray and my nephew did the work cost me fuel and have to buy him a map update for his ford nav sync($149.00).Fuel was about $200.00 still good price in all.
 

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When I got the truck last summer, I had the TB, Idler, WP, plugs, valve adjustment, tranny fluid, coolant, diff fluid, and an oil change with wiper blades for $950. The truck had 93K on it and I bought it at auction. Since I didn't know how well taken care of it was, I went ahead and had all the stuff done before I put more than 20 miles on it.
Now I have a baseline for the maintenance that needs done.
 

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When I got the truck last summer, I had the TB, Idler, WP, plugs, valve adjustment, tranny fluid, coolant, diff fluid, and an oil change with wiper blades for $950. The truck had 93K on it and I bought it at auction. Since I didn't know how well taken care of it was, I went ahead and had all the stuff done before I put more than 20 miles on it.
Now I have a baseline for the maintenance that needs done.
Yes but was this at a dealer or independent? Is it oem or aftermarket parts?
 
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