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I also bought the chains listed in the manual, they arrived yesterday and I will test fit them soon. My hope is to never need to use them, but some of the passes around here require them to be carried, if not used.
 

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...some of the passes around here require them to be carried, if not used.
I hear ya. I have been known to spend the night sleeping in my vehicle on the side of the interstate or getting a room instead of laying in snow slush to install chains. I find it interesting that the cost of a night in a motel is about the same as the cost of a set of chains. But you only have to pay for the chains one time.
 

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Being born and raised in Montana it has been breed into us since childhood where we carried chains in the winter in our trucks everywhere we went, but they never where installed to get us someplace, they were only installed to get us back out!

Bill
 

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After MUCH debating I've ordered the recommended chains
Us too, I guess the law is the law and chains are a whole lot cheaper then keeping an extra set of traction tires.............................

I am curious to know if anyone can explain why the Operators Manual is specific about tire chains on the front only.
We too curious, maybe it has to do with how the Ridgeline transfers power to the rear wheels??

Bill
 

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Here's a WAG. Since the front axles of the RL have significantly less ground clearance than the rear axles, you could high center the front on packed snow even with snow cables on the front tires. Then maybe if the rear tires had cables and good traction despite the free-spinning front wheels, the i-VTM4 might get really confused and generate undue stress on some components??? Like I said, just a wild-assed guess! :)
 

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All the weight is on the front wheels.

Most of the power is delivered to the front wheels.

Feels like a "common sense" rule more than anything.
 

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All the weight is on the front wheels.

Most of the power is delivered to the front wheels.

Feels like a "common sense" rule more than anything.
Your point makes complete sense, but could thr argument also be that we would want to increase traction to the wheels that are most likely to slip?

The one time I've gotten stuck in my Ridgeline was trying to climb my monsterobly steep driveway with 2' of snow on the ground. Ended up sliding backwards downhill. All the traction modes increase power to the rear wheel which did me no good. I needed more power to the front wheels since they were the only ones with enough weight over the axle to keep traction. I likely could have made it up with a FWD.

I still think you are right about putting the chains on the front as they have the most traction but I argue it's not entirely common sense. I was loosing traction and couldn't decide if I would be better served by chaining the wheels that weren't slipping or trying to use the chains to keep the backs from breaking loose.
 

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For some sort of crazy steep driveway you're going to want studded winter tires .

Chains are a massive pain to put on and doing it just to get up a driveway would be a hard pass for me.

I have had the same chains across my G1/G2 since 2006 and I've only ever used them twice.
 

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No debate that front wheels are the logical choice for the snow cables. Question remains about why the manual says to mount them ONLY on the front tires. What problems would be created by also putting cables on the rear tires if the situation required absolute maximum AWD traction??

For that matter, what are the issues with putting cables only on the rear wheels if:
1) you tried to ford a creek and buried the front tires in mud or loose gravel but the rear tires are still on relatively solid ground but unable to maintain enough traction to back the truck out of the creek, or
2) you buried the front end of the truck in a snow drift but the rear tires are spinning on ice or packed snow and can't help you get out?
 

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All the weight is on the front wheels. Most of the power is delivered to the front wheels. Feels like a "common sense" rule more than anything.
I think you are misinformed. "All" the weight is not on the front wheels. More, not "most", of the power is delivered to the front wheels on AWD models. Common sense is an uncommon commodity.
 

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I think you are misinformed. "All" the weight is not on the front wheels. More, not "most", of the power is delivered to the front wheels on AWD models. Common sense is an uncommon commodity.
That's right.

Only the engine is on the front wheels. The back wheels get the empty box.

That's why drivers of inferior trucks have to spend all winter driving around with sandbags in their beds because the rear wheels will just spin on the a hint of ice or a dusting of snow.
 

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That's right.

Only the engine is on the front wheels. The back wheels get the empty box.

That's why drivers of inferior trucks have to spend all winter driving around with sandbags in their beds because the rear wheels will just spin on the a hint of ice or a dusting of snow.
Haha! "You might be a redneck" if ya gotta put 500lbs sandbags in the bed to drive your truck through the snow!*
Bonus: it smooths out the ride on that Hotchkiss suspension!

* i have hauled bags of salt in the trunk of my RWD car back in the 80s when driving in snow. Have also hauled all-season wheels/tires in the trunk while i had studded snows on the RWD car.
 
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