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On my previous vehicle (Ford Explorer) I kept 35 psi front and 32 psi rear. With those settings I got 75K miles from the original Goodyears and 75K from the replacement Michelin ATX tires as well. I found the slightly higher pressure provided a bit firmer ride (which it needed); also seemed to give the sidewalls a bit of increased strength and kept the edge of the tire from rolling over and wearing as much.

Regarding, my RTL- the pressure on my tires when I first checked (after 2K miles) was almost 40 psi fronts and 36 psi rear. Very high when compared to the recommended number in the door sill and the tire Mfg's specs. However, I never noticed the higher pressure in the feel of the ride; but I did notice the hurt in MPG when I lowered the front pressure to 32.

I also checked the pressure before / after driving the truck and found out that in the current weather (approx. 82 deg. F) that the pressure increases about 3 psi once driven upon and heat put into the tire.

Thus, I'm running 36 psi front and 34 in the rear. A little high I know; but I like the ride and the mileage did seem to improve a bit. My wife and I just completed a 2.3K mile vacation trip to the Outer Banks of NC (Avon, NC) with the above psi values. With the two of us, vacation 'supplies' and two mountain bikes in the bed, we got approx. 21.3 mpg when on flatter roads of Virginia.

Lastly, I check the tires occasionally for heat (driving approx. 75mph) and the tires were hardly even 'warm' to the touch of my hand. So, from my prior experiences and the observations during the vacation trip, I think the 36 front / 34 rear psi readings are going to be 'okay.'

I'll also watch and observe though.... :)
 

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I'm surprised that most people are calling the truck more responsive. I've always felt that cars get more twitchy or darty on the highway with higher tire pressures. I'd agree with the increased mileage statement though.
 

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I've always felt that cars get more twitchy or darty on the highway with higher tire pressures.
That only holds true if the pressure is increased to the point of the contact patch area being decreased, which is overinflated.
 

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I just measured my tires b/c the light was on that I was underinflated and one was at 20psi and another 26. So i put 38 for the front and 37 rear. Is that too much?
 

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The 09 and 10 RTL with 18" wheels the tire states 44LBS max and I run 41 to get better MPG. It does make a big difference. At 32 I was getting 17MPG at 41 I am getting about 20MPG. (all air pressure is cold at about 70 degrees F. )

For those naysayers that say 44 is too high - get a wheelbarrow and read the tire ( It will be 55 to 60 lbs) fill it to the rated lbs and fill the wheelbarrow with rocks and push it around. Now lower it to 40 lbs ( this is what Honda is telling you to do with your 18" wheels rated 44lbs when you put 32 lbs in it ). and push the wheelbarrow around - you almost cannot do it. This is exactly what you are doing to your truck when you keep the pressure too low.

Tires almost never blow out for being too high at cold temperature ( they are cold at 70 F at 32lbs, they will be at 50-60 lbs after 100 miles at 70mph because the sides are flexing causing heat. if at 70F and cold at 22lbs after 100 miles at 70 mph they might reach 200lbs from temperature from the sides flexing that will cause a blow out - that is why Big Brother requires TPMS on all cars/trucks now. ) Some folks whose TMPS is on when they start their drive and it is off after 2 minutes are at the 27/28 pressure cold and warm up enough to get enough pressure to end the TPMS warning. Maybe the TPMS waring symbol should be $$$$ flying off. People seem to care if they are losing money.
 

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Yesterday after much research I had 4 new General Tire Grabber HTS
245/65R17 LLR
Serv.Desc: 111T
Load Range: XL
UTQG: 640 AB They have a Max Load of 2403lbs each or 7090 Total

Max Inflation pressure: 51psi

If we run these according to Honda's door plate @ 32psi, they look like flat tires. I noticed that the installer put 41lbs psi and the ride is very comfortable.
I would like to know what would be the optimum pressure both for safety,comfort and max gas miliage.

ANY SUGGESTIONS WOULD BE APPRECIATED
 

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Max Inflation pressure: 51psi

If we run these according to Honda's door plate @ 32psi, they look like flat tires. I noticed that the installer put 41lbs psi and the ride is very comfortable.
I would like to know what would be the optimum pressure both for safety,comfort and max gas mileage.

ANY SUGGESTIONS WOULD BE APPRECIATED
when tire pressure maximums were at 35 as listed on the tires, a lot of people ran the pressures at 32 which is 91.4% of max pressure or 3psi short of max.
On my Ridgeline tires, max is 44psi and the dealer had delivered my truck with 41psi which is where I continue to run at 93.2% of max pressure or 3psi short of max.
Your tires are 51psi max, so IMHO you would probably be ok at 91-93% of max around 46 - 47psi. which is still 4-5psi less than max pressure.
 

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I've been running 32 psi.

Anyone else?????:car004:
 

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I've been running 32 psi.

Anyone else?????:car004:
Same here. 32 psi...20,000 miles and a few rotations and my stock Michelin's are wearing perfectly.

All tire manufacturers recommend using the tire pressure thats stated on on your car's doorsill. Bottom line...Honda knows best.

But, you always have guys who think they know better than the engineers...like running different weight oils, tire pressures, fuel or oil additives ....etc.
 

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Same here. 32 psi...20,000 miles and a few rotations and my stock Michelin's are wearing perfectly.

All tire manufacturers recommend using the tire pressure thats stated on on your car's doorsill. Bottom line...Honda knows best.

But, you always have guys who think they know better than the engineers...like running different weight oils, tire pressures, fuel or oil additives ....etc.

Everytime you inflate a tire to 32 psi you are doing it on an underinflated tire.

A little overinflation (2-4 lbs) is much safer than any underinflation. That's just common sense.
 

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Everytime you inflate a tire to 32 psi you are doing it on an underinflated tire.

A little overinflation (2-4 lbs) is much safer than any underinflation. That's just common sense.
Check the cold tire pressure and inflate to 32 psi... I now have the correct pressure...not underinflated...

Or if the cold tire pressure is above 32 psi...adjust down to 32...the math is pretty simple.
 

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Check the cold tire pressure and inflate to 32 psi... I now have the correct pressure...not underinflated...

Or if the cold tire pressure is above 32 psi...adjust down to 32...the math is pretty simple.
Tires lose air over time, by keeping it a little over there is less risk of underinflation between checks, my main point. Owners manuals have to be written for everyone, not just those who can think for themselves.
 

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Tires lose air over time, by keeping it a little over there is less risk of underinflation between checks, my main point. Owners manuals have to be written for everyone, not just those who can think for themselves.
I see what you are saying, But then your tire is overinflated... It’s possible for a passenger tire initially inflated to 32 psi to lose 1 psi each month. But the car placard doesn't say "inflate to 32-36 psi"...checking it monthly is up to you.
 

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The tires can NOT be over-inflated when the MAX COLD PSI is 44 for the OEM 18's.

I base my air pressure adjustments on season, road conditions, and tire manufacture recommendations. The vehicle manufacture stamps the info on the door jamb as a reference. If using different tires with different load ratings you should follow the tire manufactures recommendation.
 

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I can illustate this better perhaps using my car as a refrence. The door jam state to inflate to 32psi - at 32 psi these tires look dangerously low do to there low profile. This is even more apparent when running different tires

From the factory it is equipped with Micheline MMX4 AS tires (245/45-18). (vehicle delivered with 40psi per corner)96V SL rating -- 44psi max cold -- note revs per mile is 775 | diameter 26.9I pulled these tires off immediately and replaced them with the Michelin Pilot Alpin PA3's as my winter tire.

100V XL rating -- 50psi max cold -- revs per mile 780 diameter 26.7

--- Note - I'm running the same 245/45-18 tire size. I'm also running 44psi cold in these tires.

For my summer rubber I'm running 285/35-19 - Continental ExtremeContact DW
99Y SL rating -- 51psi max cold -- revs per mile 775 diameter 26.9

I'll most likely run these between 40-44psi depending on my findings after a few hundred miles of driving on them.

If I ran the above tires at 32psi I'd venture to say I'd almost be riding on the rim. I'd much rather have 40psi to protect my rim and car against pot holes, manhole covers and expansion joints.

Now, for those weekends when I head out to Dragway42 I'll run slicks with a different PSI rating too! :act035:
 

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I see what you are saying, But then your tire is overinflated... It’s possible for a passenger tire initially inflated to 32 psi to lose 1 psi each month. But the car placard doesn't say "inflate to 32-36 psi"...checking it monthly is up to you.
If Honda said keeping your tires a few pounds over might gain a bit more MPG, tirelife and better handling, at some sacrifice in ride quality, that would be factual, but not wise for other reasons. Are mine "overinflated" yes, but that condition (very slight in this case) if preferable to underinflation. The only possible negative (and I have not really noticed it) is degraded ride quality.
For obvious reasons they have to assume many owners have limited knowledge about many automotive principles, and to introduce additional information may confuse them, or have them way over inflate by assuming if a little helps, more must be better. Opening themselves to lawsuits, and who knows what else.
It's a personal choice, and I choose to keep mine a few pounds higher for the very reasons I stated.

JNC..if you follow Michelin's recommendations, you will find them throwing it back on the auto mfg.'s specs. Other than recommend you check air regularly, and treadwear, etc. they make no specific recommendations.
Some of this is the result of the Ford Exploder case, where neglectful owners were let off the hook. And Ford took the brunt of the outcome. But they did have a vehicle with a greater potential for rollover, especially if tire pressures were ignored. And this was all before TPMS.
Fortunately, we have TPMS that now neglectful owners can fall back on. Overinflation can be a 'good' thing, it all depends on how you intend to use your vehicle. Keeping the factory setting could be more dangerous under severe conditions, like track. For that endeavor the factory setting would have you 'underinflated' . The only justfication for ever having underinflation on the Ridgeline would be driving in sand.
 

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It is my understanding that the pressure on the door jamb is not for reference....it is the pressure that all safety tests are done at for handling, stopping etc. It is the pressure you should run at under all normal driving conditions.

2-3 pounds higher is not a big deal. Under inflated would be worse. Ambient temperature plays a big role in tire pressure....roughly 1 pound per 10F change.
 

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It is my understanding that the pressure on the door jamb is not for reference....it is the pressure that all safety tests are done at for handling, stopping etc. It is the pressure you should run at under all normal driving conditions.

2-3 pounds higher is not a big deal. Under inflated would be worse. Ambient temperature plays a big role in tire pressure....roughly 1 pound per 10F change.
The mfg has to select a pressure rating that will meet normal conditions with the least impact on ride quality, and still meet safety requirements.
I would not be surprised if it could meet those safety specs even easier with some higher pressures but then the car would not replicate what the average owner experiences.
 

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It is my understanding that the pressure on the door jamb is not for reference....it is the pressure that all safety tests are done at for handling, stopping etc. It is the pressure you should run at under all normal driving conditions.
I agree, Honda says the correct pressure is 32 psi front and back... So I will follow that...you can choose any psi you'd like.
 
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