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The tires can NOT be over-inflated when the MAX COLD PSI is 44 for the OEM 18's.

I base my air pressure adjustments on season, road conditions, and tire manufacture recommendations. The vehicle manufacture stamps the info on the door jamb as a reference. If using different tires with different load ratings you should follow the tire manufactures recommendation.
All vehicles would have different psi recommendations when using the exact same tire.... and yes your tire is overinflated if its on a Ridgeline and it's more than 32 psi, even if Max. psi is 44. The tire manufacturers don't have a recommendation on psi, they leave it up to the Automaker.
 

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I went to check my tires cuz they looked like they were gettin flat and they were all at 35 psi which is what it says is max on the tire so I just left it.
 

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I went to check my tires cuz they looked like they were gettin flat and they were all at 35 psi which is what it says is max on the tire so I just left it.
You should not use the max on the tire as the proper setting point. That is truly the MAX pressure you can safely use for that tire. It is not what is necessarily the best setting for the vehicle the tires are installed on. Use your vehicles owner's manual for that when it doubt what to use. That's the safest thing to do if you are not sure.
 

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I try to keep mine at 35psi but up here in the cold weather you just don't know how much air is in them, it depends a lot on the ambient temperature.
 

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The mfg has to select a pressure rating that will meet normal conditions with the least impact on ride quality, and still meet safety requirements.
I would not be surprised if it could meet those safety specs even easier with some higher pressures but then the car would not replicate what the average owner experiences.
Chrysler engineers have led me to believe that the door jamb pressure should be followed for normal driving applications. Increasing pressure (or decreasing) could change the oversteer/understeer characteristics of the vehicle thus changing the handling of the vehicle for the safety requirements stats listed for it.

You could take that a step further if you knew whether your vehicle had inherent under or oversteer by adding or subtracting air. Few vehicles are perfectly balanced. ....but you would not increase / decrease equal pressure to all 4 corners. The back and front would likely be 2-4 pounds apart from each other depending on the condition you were trying to correct.
 

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Chrysler engineers have led me to believe that the door jamb pressure should be followed for normal driving applications. Increasing pressure (or decreasing) could change the oversteer/understeer characteristics of the vehicle thus changing the handling of the vehicle for the safety requirements stats listed for it.

You could take that a step further if you knew whether your vehicle had inherent under or oversteer by adding or subtracting air. Few vehicles are perfectly balanced. ....but you would not increase / decrease equal pressure to all 4 corners. The back and front would likely be 2-4 pounds apart from each other depending on the condition you were trying to correct.
I agree, you can certainly change handling characteristics through differential pressures, front to rear. A few pounds applied equally would have little if any bias with regards to handling in the RL IMO.
In a sports or HP car, where weight distribution is more critically engineered, as well as steering geometry, suspension tuning, and tire compounds, we are talking apples & oranges.
 

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Food for thought.... Just a few quotes..

Disadvantages of Underinflation

An underinflated tire can't maintain its shape and becomes flatter than intended while in contact with the road. If a vehicle’s tires are underinflated by only 6 psi it could lead to tire failure. Additionally, the tire’s tread life could be reduced by as much as 25%. Lower inflation pressure will allow the tire to deflect (bend) more as it rolls. This will build up internal heat, increase rolling resistance and cause a reduction in fuel economy of up to 5%. You would experience a significant loss of steering precision and cornering stability. While 6 psi doesn’t seem excessively low, remember, it usually represents about 20% of the tire’s recommended pressure.

Disadvantages of Overinflation

An overinflated tire is stiff and unyielding and the size of its footprint in contact with the road is reduced. If a vehicle's tires are overinflated by 6 psi, they could be damaged more easily when running over potholes or debris in the road. Higher inflated tires cannot isolate road irregularities well, causing them to ride harsher. However, higher inflation pressures usually provide an improvement in steering response and cornering stability up to a point. This is why participants who use street tires in autocrosses, track events and road races run higher than normal inflation pressures. The pressure must be checked with a quality air gauge as the inflation pressure cannot be accurately estimated through visual inspection

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=1

http://www.trustmymechanic.com/tire_pressure.html
 

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Food for thought.... Just a few quotes..

Disadvantages of Underinflation

An underinflated tire can't maintain its shape and becomes flatter than intended while in contact with the road. If a vehicle’s tires are underinflated by only 6 psi it could lead to tire failure. Additionally, the tire’s tread life could be reduced by as much as 25%. Lower inflation pressure will allow the tire to deflect (bend) more as it rolls. This will build up internal heat, increase rolling resistance and cause a reduction in fuel economy of up to 5%. You would experience a significant loss of steering precision and cornering stability. While 6 psi doesn’t seem excessively low, remember, it usually represents about 20% of the tire’s recommended pressure.

Disadvantages of Overinflation

An overinflated tire is stiff and unyielding and the size of its footprint in contact with the road is reduced. If a vehicle's tires are overinflated by 6 psi, they could be damaged more easily when running over potholes or debris in the road. Higher inflated tires cannot isolate road irregularities well, causing them to ride harsher. However, higher inflation pressures usually provide an improvement in steering response and cornering stability up to a point. This is why participants who use street tires in autocrosses, track events and road races run higher than normal inflation pressures. The pressure must be checked with a quality air gauge as the inflation pressure cannot be accurately estimated through visual inspection

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=1

http://www.trustmymechanic.com/tire_pressure.html
Nice summary!
 

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2-3 pounds higher is not a big deal. Under inflated would be worse. Ambient temperature plays a big role in tire pressure....roughly 1 pound per 10F change.
I agree, you can certainly change handling characteristics through differential pressures, front to rear. A few pounds applied equally would have little if any bias with regards to handling in the RL IMO.
In a sports or HP car, where weight distribution is more critically engineered, as well as steering geometry, suspension tuning, and tire compounds, we are talking apples & oranges.
We agree about 2-3 pounds extra in the RL having little effect. Underinflation would be worse. I try to run the door pressure, but if a tire is low, I too will put 1-2 more in. An exception would be our high HP cars. The door says 29. That's what I run unless racing...where I do run a differential from rear to front to help correct the inherent understeer. The explanation of both conditions above here is a good one.
 

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Just checked mine and the dealer had inflated my tires to 38 cold (I bet some numbskull had inflated them to 44) it's been about two months since it was last in the shop for service, enough tome for air loss and lower temps to affect the reading. Anyway I usually run 32 in them. I'm going to air down to at least 34. I was wondering why my ride felt a bit harsher lately.

Overinflation is a no no IMHO I destroyed a set of wheel bearings that way on another vehicle many years ago.
 
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