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Discussion Starter #1
I just wanted to confirm something - in order to lock the rear diff, do you have to turn VSA off?

While on my test drive today, I tried to lock the rear diff and no go. I just did a search and it seems to indicate having to turn VSA off. But Honda's literature (not owners manual, I don't have a truck yet) doesn't appaer to mention this.

thanks,
-S
 

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I think you have to have the Tranny in first gear before it will lock. I made the same mistake.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't. I was just pushing buttons when I was test driving my truck to be, to make sure everything worked. :)
 

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I don't have my owner's manual in front of me, but the VTM-4 Lock only works in 1st or 2nd gear up to 19 mph. I believe when the VTM-4 Lock is engaged, this automatically disengages the VSA. I also seem to remember that you must be in a stopped condition to Lock the VTM-4.

You would want to do this when you are truly stuck. Otherwise the VSA and VTM-4 will keep transferring the engine power to what ever wheel is not slipping. There are times when you need all four wheels to turn. Typical situations are when you are stuck in snow, mud, or sand. Remember only do this when you are truly stuck.
 

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And if I read correctly, it DOESN'T LOCK your rear diff, it only locks the power transferrance between front and back. The rear diff is a "torque sensing" gear driven setup designed to transfer power to the non slipping wheel, NOT actually locking the two wheels together. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong. All I know is that I was on an extremely loose gravelly road the other day and just for onryness I got all over the throttle and I have NEVER had a vehicle be so stable in those conditions....no slide whatsoever! Thanks Honda!
 

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Couldn't find the info for the Ridgeline, but I attached the VTM-4 info from when the Pilot was released. The Ridgline has slightly differnt specs (torque %, etc.), but the operation is the same. It doesn't say it specifically, but the VTM-4 system does lock the rear diff in VTM-4 lock mode (Hence the name). Well, it doesn't lock the diff, as it has no diff, but it does lock the two rear halfshafts together. It does this by fully energizing both clutch packs on either side of the hypoid gear set. You must be in first, second, or reverse, and be travelling below 18 mph. It does not deactivate the VSA.

Cheers,
Jeffro



Variable Torque Management 4-wheel-drive (VTM-4)
The Pilot's innovative VTM-4 four-wheel drive system was designed to deliver outstanding traction, stability and control in all weather conditions as well as good medium-duty off-road performance. It was also designed to minimize the weight and packaging penalties associated with conventional four-wheel drive systems.

The VTM-4 system is unique in its operation. Unlike many competitive systems that use an engagement strategy triggered by wheel slippage, VTM-4 anticipates the need for all-wheel drive and engages the rear wheels whenever the vehicle is accelerating. Additional torque is applied to the rear wheels when wheel slip is detected, up to an approximate maximum of 50-percent in low gear. Another unique feature of the system is the VTM-4 Lock function.

Activated by a button on the instrument panel, the VTM-4 Lock mode delivers maximum torque transfer to the rear wheels to aid extraction from extremely slippery or "stuck" conditions. The feature works only when the vehicle is in first, second or reverse gears, and automatically disengages at speeds above 18 miles per hour.

When cruising under normal conditions, the Pilot provides front-wheel drive power for improved efficiency. Torque is proactively distributed to the rear wheels when the vehicle is accelerating or wheel slip is detected. The level of torque delivery, front to rear, is determined by the amount of acceleration (rate of change in velocity) and wheel slip (difference in rotational speed) and is controlled by a dedicated CPU with sensors in the braking, engine and transmission systems.

To avoid the weight and bulk of a conventional transfer case, VTM-4's torque transfer unit is a compact cast-aluminum housing bolted directly to transaxle. The transfer case is a single-speed, permanently engaged device without a low-range, reducing weight and space penalties while maintaining excellent on- and off-road capabilities. Attached to the front wheel differential's ring gear is a helical gear that provides input torque to the transfer unit. A short horizontal shaft and a hypoid gear set within the case turn the drive ninety degrees, move it to the vehicle center line and lower its axis by approximately 3.75-inches.

VTM-4 Engagement Modes
There are three distinct modes of VTM-4 engagement:

(1) The first mode, called Acceleration Torque Control (ATC), works whenever the vehicle's throttle is depressed, even on dry pavement - a feature unique to the VTM-4 system. Sensors in the engine and transmission monitor vehicle speed and acceleration. The amount of torque applied, as directed by the system's ECU, is determined according to vehicle speed, the amount of acceleration and transmission status (gear setting). This benefits not only the Pilot's ability to gain traction from a standing start, before wheel slip occurs, but also its overall dynamic stability on both dry and slippery roads. Reducing the propulsive force carried by the front tires under acceleration reduced torque steer and cornering adhesion. Rear wheel torque rises smoothly from zero to a preset maximum in proportion to vehicle acceleration (both forward and reverse). During constant-speed driving, all power is driven to the front wheels for improved fuel efficiency.

(2) The second engagement mode occurs when wheel slip is detected. Differences in rotational speed between front and rear wheels are measured by sensors in the ABS system and monitored by the ECU. In response, the ECU commands an increase in torque delivery to the rear wheels. Torque application is adjusted according to the amount and the rate of change in wheel slip. As slip increase, more power is delivered to the rear wheels for improved traction.

(3) The third mode of engagement is VTM-4 Lock. Lock mode occurs when the driver shifts into first, second or reverse gears and depresses the VTM-Lock button on the instrument panel. When lock mode is selected at vehicle speeds below 18-mph, the system ECU commands a preset maximum amount of rear-drive torque to be delivered to the rear wheels for improved traction in very low-speed, low-traction, conditions. As control is regained and vehicle speed increases, the system gradually reduces rear axle torque until it is completely disengaged.

The maximum torque delivered to the rear wheels is sufficient to climb the steepest grade observed on any public road in America - 31-degrees (60 percent slope) - with a two-passenger load on board. The Pilot will also move from rest up a 28-degree (53 percent slope) dirt grade. On a split-friction grade (different amounts of traction at each wheel), VTM-4 automatically provides sufficient rear-wheel torque to help the vehicle climb a steep, slippery driveway to enter a garage.

Propeller Shaft
The two-piece propeller shaft that carries torque from the transfer case to the rear-drive unit is made of high-strength steel tubing to permit a smaller diameter. Minimizing driveline dimensions improves both ground clearance and interior room. The cross yokes attached at each end by friction welding are forged steel for high strength and low weight. The center support bearing is rubber isolated to block the transmission of driveline noise from the interior of the vehicle. A low-friction plunger joint located near the center of the propeller shaft accommodates relative motion between front- and rear-mounted driveline components.

A tuned-mass damper inside the front portion of the propeller shaft cancels any bending tendency in response to powertrain vibrations. Equal-length, front-wheel half-shafts have a plunger joint at their inboard end and a ball-type universal joint at the wheel end. Rear half shafts are similar in design but use a double-offset joint at the inboard end and a ball joint at the outboard end. All universal joints are constant-velocity type.

Rear Axle Drive Unit
The Pilot's rear axle drive unit consists of a hypoid ring-and-pinion gear set supported by a cast-aluminum housing which switches torque from the propeller shaft's longitudinal orientation to the lateral orientation necessary to drive the rear wheels.

A connection from the ring gear to each wheel's half-shaft is made by left- and right-side clutches. Each drive clutch consists of three elements: an electromagnetic coil, ball-cam device and set of 19 wet clutch plates which are similar in design to clutches used in an automatic transmission. Ten of the plates are splined (mechanically connected) to the ring gear while nine of the plates are splined to a half shaft.

When the VTM-4 system's electronic control unit (ECU) determines that torque should be distributed to the rear wheels, an electric current is sent to the two electromagnetic coils. The resulting magnetic field moves a rotating steel plate toward each fixed coil. Friction between that steel plate and an adjoining cam plate causes the cam plate to begin turning. As it does, three balls per clutch roll up curved ramps, creating an axial thrust against a clutch-engagement plate. This thrust force compresses the wet clutch plates, engaging the corresponding rear wheel.

Unlike mechanically actuated four-wheel drive systems, the VTM-4 system is infinitely variable. The amount of torque provided to the rear wheels is directly proportional to the electric current sent from the ECU and can be adjusted from zero to a preset maximum. This current constantly changes to deliver the optimum rear torque calculated by the ECU. An internal gear pump circulates VTM-4 fluid to cool and lubricate the clutches, bearings and gears within the rear drive unit. Use of high-strength, low-weight materials - such as die-cast aluminum for the housing - minimizes the bulk and weight of the hardware.
 

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Check out this link for Specs on the Ridgeline VTM-4 (Modes) Plus other Specs.
http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=159
jeffro said:
Couldn't find the info for the Ridgeline, but I attached the VTM-4 info from when the Pilot was released. The Ridgline has slightly differnt specs (torque %, etc.), but the operation is the same. It doesn't say it specifically, but the VTM-4 system does lock the rear diff in VTM-4 lock mode (Hence the name). Well, it doesn't lock the diff, as it has no diff, but it does lock the two rear halfshafts together. It does this by fully energizing both clutch packs on either side of the hypoid gear set. You must be in first, second, or reverse, and be travelling below 18 mph. It does not deactivate the VSA.

Cheers,
Jeffro



Variable Torque Management 4-wheel-drive (VTM-4)
The Pilot's innovative VTM-4 four-wheel drive system was designed to deliver outstanding traction, stability and control in all weather conditions as well as good medium-duty off-road performance. It was also designed to minimize the weight and packaging penalties associated with conventional four-wheel drive systems.

The VTM-4 system is unique in its operation. Unlike many competitive systems that use an engagement strategy triggered by wheel slippage, VTM-4 anticipates the need for all-wheel drive and engages the rear wheels whenever the vehicle is accelerating. Additional torque is applied to the rear wheels when wheel slip is detected, up to an approximate maximum of 50-percent in low gear. Another unique feature of the system is the VTM-4 Lock function.

Activated by a button on the instrument panel, the VTM-4 Lock mode delivers maximum torque transfer to the rear wheels to aid extraction from extremely slippery or "stuck" conditions. The feature works only when the vehicle is in first, second or reverse gears, and automatically disengages at speeds above 18 miles per hour.

When cruising under normal conditions, the Pilot provides front-wheel drive power for improved efficiency. Torque is proactively distributed to the rear wheels when the vehicle is accelerating or wheel slip is detected. The level of torque delivery, front to rear, is determined by the amount of acceleration (rate of change in velocity) and wheel slip (difference in rotational speed) and is controlled by a dedicated CPU with sensors in the braking, engine and transmission systems.

To avoid the weight and bulk of a conventional transfer case, VTM-4's torque transfer unit is a compact cast-aluminum housing bolted directly to transaxle. The transfer case is a single-speed, permanently engaged device without a low-range, reducing weight and space penalties while maintaining excellent on- and off-road capabilities. Attached to the front wheel differential's ring gear is a helical gear that provides input torque to the transfer unit. A short horizontal shaft and a hypoid gear set within the case turn the drive ninety degrees, move it to the vehicle center line and lower its axis by approximately 3.75-inches.

VTM-4 Engagement Modes
There are three distinct modes of VTM-4 engagement:

(1) The first mode, called Acceleration Torque Control (ATC), works whenever the vehicle's throttle is depressed, even on dry pavement - a feature unique to the VTM-4 system. Sensors in the engine and transmission monitor vehicle speed and acceleration. The amount of torque applied, as directed by the system's ECU, is determined according to vehicle speed, the amount of acceleration and transmission status (gear setting). This benefits not only the Pilot's ability to gain traction from a standing start, before wheel slip occurs, but also its overall dynamic stability on both dry and slippery roads. Reducing the propulsive force carried by the front tires under acceleration reduced torque steer and cornering adhesion. Rear wheel torque rises smoothly from zero to a preset maximum in proportion to vehicle acceleration (both forward and reverse). During constant-speed driving, all power is driven to the front wheels for improved fuel efficiency.

(2) The second engagement mode occurs when wheel slip is detected. Differences in rotational speed between front and rear wheels are measured by sensors in the ABS system and monitored by the ECU. In response, the ECU commands an increase in torque delivery to the rear wheels. Torque application is adjusted according to the amount and the rate of change in wheel slip. As slip increase, more power is delivered to the rear wheels for improved traction.

(3) The third mode of engagement is VTM-4 Lock. Lock mode occurs when the driver shifts into first, second or reverse gears and depresses the VTM-Lock button on the instrument panel. When lock mode is selected at vehicle speeds below 18-mph, the system ECU commands a preset maximum amount of rear-drive torque to be delivered to the rear wheels for improved traction in very low-speed, low-traction, conditions. As control is regained and vehicle speed increases, the system gradually reduces rear axle torque until it is completely disengaged.

The maximum torque delivered to the rear wheels is sufficient to climb the steepest grade observed on any public road in America - 31-degrees (60 percent slope) - with a two-passenger load on board. The Pilot will also move from rest up a 28-degree (53 percent slope) dirt grade. On a split-friction grade (different amounts of traction at each wheel), VTM-4 automatically provides sufficient rear-wheel torque to help the vehicle climb a steep, slippery driveway to enter a garage.

Propeller Shaft
The two-piece propeller shaft that carries torque from the transfer case to the rear-drive unit is made of high-strength steel tubing to permit a smaller diameter. Minimizing driveline dimensions improves both ground clearance and interior room. The cross yokes attached at each end by friction welding are forged steel for high strength and low weight. The center support bearing is rubber isolated to block the transmission of driveline noise from the interior of the vehicle. A low-friction plunger joint located near the center of the propeller shaft accommodates relative motion between front- and rear-mounted driveline components.

A tuned-mass damper inside the front portion of the propeller shaft cancels any bending tendency in response to powertrain vibrations. Equal-length, front-wheel half-shafts have a plunger joint at their inboard end and a ball-type universal joint at the wheel end. Rear half shafts are similar in design but use a double-offset joint at the inboard end and a ball joint at the outboard end. All universal joints are constant-velocity type.

Rear Axle Drive Unit
The Pilot's rear axle drive unit consists of a hypoid ring-and-pinion gear set supported by a cast-aluminum housing which switches torque from the propeller shaft's longitudinal orientation to the lateral orientation necessary to drive the rear wheels.

A connection from the ring gear to each wheel's half-shaft is made by left- and right-side clutches. Each drive clutch consists of three elements: an electromagnetic coil, ball-cam device and set of 19 wet clutch plates which are similar in design to clutches used in an automatic transmission. Ten of the plates are splined (mechanically connected) to the ring gear while nine of the plates are splined to a half shaft.

When the VTM-4 system's electronic control unit (ECU) determines that torque should be distributed to the rear wheels, an electric current is sent to the two electromagnetic coils. The resulting magnetic field moves a rotating steel plate toward each fixed coil. Friction between that steel plate and an adjoining cam plate causes the cam plate to begin turning. As it does, three balls per clutch roll up curved ramps, creating an axial thrust against a clutch-engagement plate. This thrust force compresses the wet clutch plates, engaging the corresponding rear wheel.

Unlike mechanically actuated four-wheel drive systems, the VTM-4 system is infinitely variable. The amount of torque provided to the rear wheels is directly proportional to the electric current sent from the ECU and can be adjusted from zero to a preset maximum. This current constantly changes to deliver the optimum rear torque calculated by the ECU. An internal gear pump circulates VTM-4 fluid to cool and lubricate the clutches, bearings and gears within the rear drive unit. Use of high-strength, low-weight materials - such as die-cast aluminum for the housing - minimizes the bulk and weight of the hardware.
 

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I always lock my VTM-4 in shady areas, would not want it stolen, diminishes resale you know.

I have to admit that the Ridgeline is not a rock crawler, I take my labs for a swim at the lake. I usualy back in to a spot there that is just off the road, it is not overly steep but there is a lip at the edge of the pavement about six inches tall. Twice I have tried to pull out of there and encountered wheel spin. Both times I engaged VTM-4 lock with no success, I needed to roll back and get a running start. It is just a small step but it stops me in my tracks with the rear wheels spinning in gravel.

I did not buy this truck for its four wheeling ability. It is a great road car and does well on wet roads. I drive in the rain far more often than I drive off road.

The stiff chasis that makes it handle well works against it in rough situations. A truck that flexes like a slinky does better there, those rock crawlers also feels like you are driving a slinky if you push it hard on the road.

All cars are a compromise, I chose the car that compromises the least for my usage, the Ridgeline compromises vary little.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The tires could be part of the problem.
These tires are better suited for highway work than any sort of rough surfaces.
 

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Yes I Know, these tires are great on the highway. That is where I spend most of the time, I would not want an off road tire that diminishes handling and that I need to listen to howl as I am going down the road.

Tires like cars are compomises, the Michlins do a great job for what I want.
 
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