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Getting ready to change spark plugs and looking for a nice quality "clicker" type torque wrench to deliver a perfect 13 ft lbs of torque. I have several old style BEAM type wrenches that work "OK" on the bigger stuff and when viewing angles are not a problem. I have been a CRAFTSMAN person in the past but am growing dissatisfied and skeptical with their products. Lots of mixed reviews on their own Sears website, especially the recent reviews. Thanks in advance for your input.
 

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I agree with your assessment of Craftsman as I have experienced the same problem over the years. they continue to cheapen their product as Sears goes downhill, and they now they sell their brand in Kmart and Ace Hardware. There may also be other outlets.

Today's tool market seems to be going the way of everything else. Disposable.

here is one to look at on Amazon. they have a number of different types.


The last TQ wrench I bought was about 4 years ago from either Home Depot or Lowes and was their "store" brand. Is it any better? I don't know. I have been happy with it but only use it about twice a year.
 

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I think at that lower torque you are looking for 3/8. I would still buy craftsman if usa made or hf pro series if not made in china. Taiwan ok not china. 13 pounds is pretty low so buy one in that lower range.

This one goes to 10 pounds good reviews and according to reviews taiwan made.

If you do all low torque like you said 13 pounds, consider the same but 1/4 inch inch pounds
 

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I would never use a torque wrench on a spark plug. It doesn't click and before you know it you've stripped the head. 10ft lbs is nothing and easily doable by feel. That's just snug and another 1/8 turn. Most 3/8 socket wrench are about a foot long so just apply what feels like 13lbs of pressure, IE not much.
 

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I would never use a torque wrench on a spark plug. It doesn't click and before you know it you've stripped the head. 10ft lbs is nothing and easily doable by feel. That's just snug and another 1/8 turn. Most 3/8 socket wrench are about a foot long so just apply what feels like 13lbs of pressure, IE not much.
That's some of the worse advice I've ever seen.

Why wouldn't a properly-functioning torque wrench click at the set torque value? While there are experienced wrench heads that can generally get "close enough", that's bad advice with today's tight tolerances and materials. "Just snug" is relative. "Another 1/8 turn" is relative and variable. What feels like 13 lbs. of force to one person one one day may feel differently to another person on a different day. I suppose the concept of using torque sticks on an impact wrench to tighten your lugs nuts is overkill, huh?

Regarding tool brands, Mac and Snap On seem to be a some of the last remaining decent brands. The old Craftsman tools (along with some Snap On and Cornwell) I inherited from my grandfather years ago are still going strong. The bulk of those tools were purchased in the 60s and 70s. The new Craftsman tools I've since purchased or received as warranty replacements aren't near as good of quality. Lowes' Kobalt brand seems to be on par, if not a bit better, than current Craftsman.
 

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Of course setting the correct torque also involves clean threads. There is no good reason 'not' to use an adequate torque wrench. Does not mean spending $200-400 for one that you want to have calibrated every 6 months, or when you accidentally drop it. Most of the ones mentioned will suffice for the weekend or shade tree mechanic.
Even if you used one with a pointer and not a clicker, you would certainly get more reliable and accurate results then 'snug' or 'just tight enough'.
The partial turn past finger tight worked most of time with cast iron blocks and heads but those days are mostly over.
 

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Also, the most accurate usage will be with the required torque being in the middle of the range of the torque wrench. You don't want to use a torque wrench suitable for torquing the lug nuts to do the spark plugs.

The 2nd link henni posted is for a 40-250 lb-in torque wrench. 13 lb-ft is 156 lb-in... pretty much in the middle of the range.
 
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