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Green With Envy Moderator
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Excellent video!! Nice demonstration going up the hill of how a locking differential can help out.

One thing: does the navi system have a 'bread crumbing' feature? There was a quick shot of the navi screen and the 'road' ahead of the vehicle looked like a smooth line but the 'road' behind looked dotted.
 

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Did any of you read the responses from the TOV members? :mad:
Some of them are upset that he backed down the hill to go at it again...
The people that think "Honda doesn't get trucks" just don't get the Ridgeline!
We don't want this truck for running in the Baja races. It is for getting to our favorite fishing hole or where we like to go dirtbike riding. Well i guess they will never get it, and if they do then they will be driving a Ridgeline. :p
 

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I'm glad I managed to stumble onto this thread that hasn't gotten too much traffic. Very cool video. Apparently you need some sort of permission to watch the high quality version of this video. Unfortunately, I had to try to watch the low res. low BW version. I have a couple questions regarding the apparently controversial hill climb portion of the run. Gary Flint speaks of feeling the VSA helping here and there throughout the course. Not surprising as I would think it would shine under these conditions, wheels losing and gaining traction on loose dirt and going over bumps.

When he’s going up the hill, he says he “ hit the cruise instead of VSA.” I can see how that might happen bouncing up a rough incline reaching down to find the correct button.
1) Why would VSA hinder his climb and not help him up the hill?
2) Wouldn’t disengaging this feature simply put him solely in front wheel drive?
3) When he engaged the “VTM-4 Lock” on his second shot up, didn’t it appear as though he was going much faster than the recommended speed for this feature?


Could someone please enlighten me as to the thought process behind these decisions (mostly trying to disengage VSA on his first attempt). I can see me going up steep hills in the snow this winter. I would never consider turning VSA off.

Thanks in advance!
PS Great work T Mac digging up all this cool stuff!
 

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I haven't done this kind of thing with my Ridgeline yet. That said, I think it's the difference between climbing a hill (VSA on) and attacking a hill (VSA off). There's a place for each approach.
 

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it's been a while since i looked at the video but since somebody ressurected this thread i'll ask a question. why does flint keep shifting gears? isn't he on drive. it didn't look like he was using the gears for engine braking?
 

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To rephrase my question...what does VSA do if you are going up a hill in show and all 4 tires are spinning as you are making your way up? VSA will sense the slipping on ALL tires. How will it react?? :confused:
 

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Answers to VSA questions:

1. The course that was shown in the video was pounded on by over 60 runs prior to the TOV demonstration. The course was torn up and in terrible shape. Due to the extensive use, the top surface was covered in loose sand and dirt. The VSA system limits wheel slip, which under certain conditions prevents you from maintaining forward momentum; this was one of those examples.
2. Disengaging VSA does not put the vehicle in front wheel drive. The VTM-4 system is automatic and is always active transferring power to the rear axle when appropriate. It is also predictive rather than reactive like the competitive systems. It always launches in 4wd. Disengaging VSA simply allows you to control wheel slip with the throttle rather than the computer over-riding your inputs. It generally always better to leave the system in automatic mode until it intervenes excessively due to the road conditions. All the previous runs during the day were conducted in full auto mode. Unfortunately, when this demonstration was done, the course condition had excessively deteriorated.
3. The vehicle was also placed in VTM-4 lock which sends the maximum amount of torque to the rear axle. In order for this to be engaged, the vehicle must be placed in 1st or 2nd gear and driven at speed under 15mph. During the second run both the VSA was shot off, and VTM-4 lock was engaged to allow maximum possible torque to be transmitted to the rear wheels. This was an excessively steep hill which is difficult to understand from the video (28 degrees). As for speed, in general, speed is not your friend when off-roading. It makes for great videos, but is not good for control or safety.
 

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You da' man Kodiak!
I was confusing VSA and VTM-4! I had them somewhat bass ackwards! So in the scenario I stated where you are going up a snow covered hill and all wheels are spinning as you are heading up. VSA could conceivably stop you in your tracks? If this is the case I guess it would be better to run with VSA if you are on roads with slick snow covered spots but if you are trying to climb a covered hill and all wheels are spinning you are better off to disengage the VSA?! Is this correct?
 

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In general, it is best to leave the VSA engaged. It will instantly respond to the road conditions an make any necessary correction to keep you on you intended course.

If you are plowing through deep snow, it is likely you need the tires to slip to gain forward momentum. This and sand are two conditions where it better to disengage the VSA and do the driving yourself.
 

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That is possibly the gayest video on Earth. The Vehicle Project Designer even says that the course is designed to be the at the targeted maximum difficulty that the truck will ever encounter. He then stalls the truck on the 28% incline and proceeds to back the truck downhill, an extremely sketchy manuver that often leads to sidehilling and rolling over.

This course is simple enough that any off the shelf Accord with snow tires and front wheel drive could complete the course. Sure, some body scrub from breakover angle might occur, but the "medium duty" course is not very impressive. He also states that the course is a basic "autocross" course. That means an offroad course where autos are able to travel.

He also says that the last watercrossing is "extreme". 12" of water is not extreme. I see that in the winter on city streets, quite often.

He also shows the truck wheels coming off the ground in the end of the video with the differential lock engaging. Admiring the rigidity of the body, he talks about the smooth ride. Articulation off road is key to keeping the wheels on the trail. Picking up a wheel is bad. Articulation and flex is good.

Once again, it's a nice truck and I'd be happy to stay on road. It won't be going off road at all. The video just proved that.
 

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I'm with Shark on this one. Interesting video, but it would have been more educational if the driver spoke more about the settings he expected the truck to be in for the potential buyer trying a simple environment like he was on. Obviously not designed to be in the Baja race stright of the assembly line and possibly over engineered with safety features tha may prohibit alterations to run on an even slightly tougher course than the video. I personally will need to go through snow and ice and would welcome anyone with more insight to the proper settings and mindset for this truck in those conditions. Thanks.
 

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BillB said:
I'm with Shark on this one. Interesting video, but it would have been more educational if the driver spoke more about the settings he expected the truck to be in for the potential buyer trying a simple environment like he was on. Obviously not designed to be in the Baja race stright of the assembly line and possibly over engineered with safety features tha may prohibit alterations to run on an even slightly tougher course than the video. I personally will need to go through snow and ice and would welcome anyone with more insight to the proper settings and mindset for this truck in those conditions. Thanks.
Not sure I understand what you mean by proper setting. I mean normal snow and ice type stuff you can do in any car if you drive with some sense, and you shouldn't really try to tackle much more than that in any vehicle unless it is a snow plow. You would be surprised how many snow storms I have driven through in my little Civic without any problem while there are SUVs piled in the median. It isn't about being able to handle it, it is about using common sense and slowing down to deal with the condition and now over correcting on it. The Ridgeline does have a form of traction control which should help in normal winter travel, but if you are planning to tackle snow directly at slower speeds you may want to turn off the VSA and lock VTM-4. VSA would stop all wheels spinning if it notices that they are slipping, which may be something you need to allow in some snowy conditions.

Maybe you can explain a little more as to what you are thinking you need to tackle it would certainly help in providing you with the information you want/need. I have been up in the NE all my life and have driven through and after many snow storms. I am very familiar with icy conditions having driven the first 5 years of having a license through Maine winters and now in Massachusetts for the last 10+ (some overlap there while in college). Not to say we have the worse conditions, Buffalo tends to be worse than up here.
 

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White Shark said:
This course is simple enough that any off the shelf Accord with snow tires and front wheel drive could complete the course.

You don't know what your talking about do you? I thought so, just checking. That truck climbed a 28 degree loose surface hill !! Please don't bother posting if you don't know what your talking about.
 

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DUPLICATE POST: :rolleyes:
I saw the video, I would say it was a decent video and it showed me at least that the HONDA will do ALL I will ever need it to do. As for the hill, I wonder if that was just a marketing ploy for the VSA/VTM. Maybe they wanted to stop first, engage it, then do the hill, It should of made that hill either way. Of course with the lack of OFF ROAD tires and a LOW RANGE, its not gonna be a normal 4x4. So don't try to compare it as such. LOW RANGE makes a big difference on steep hills, but it wouldn't be needed on that hill. As a 4 wheeler, I have climbed hills that went straight up and looked like the truck would flip backwards, you needed a low range for these hills. My decision to buy a ridgeline goes beyond the ability to climb hills. That was the old days. I want more on road traction, a smooth handling ride, and the ability to do at least what Gary did, (get me to my hunting/fishing hole and back) if I need it. Not climb, or jump hills and tear up my $30,000 truck. Plus I have to admit, for all that bouncing around and as fast as he was going, it was pretty damn quiet inside that truck. Not the usual banging and rattling. And the independent suspension, (one wheel in the air) was cool. Some 4x4s with open diffs would have had that wheel spinning away, not helping at all. Again the Ridgeline is Not the usual 4x4 axel, one side up, other side down. I just can't wait to pick mine up.:cool:
 

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I agree with Shark , what a woos of a hill . I know what I'm talking about . I drove a 7 mile dirt road for 7 years , it went from 300 feet to 2200 feet, back down to 1500 and up to 2000 feet and I was home . I did it in a 64 IH 2 wheel drive, a 74 chevy cheyenne and a 86 subaru wagon . Sure and steady was always the way to go and there were times that the road was in a lot worse shape than the one in the video . There were times that someone would ask me how I got up the road in my IH ,and I would say slowly but surely , also I never backed down, just onwardly forward.:)
 

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i thought it was a decnt video clip.thier are always people that will knock on things the point of the video is to show how vtm and 4-wheel drive works.point when he was lift the tires off the ground was showing you that side did not have any traction so your power is going to the wheels with the most traction (tire that was off the grund was not turning to fast.i guess its how you look at the video to me it was just showing that if come to a certin path how the truck is going to act.i know that truck will climb and do alot of things if you have the abilty to do so.i belive he was driving the unit like a noraml person would drive it and not tare it up
 
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