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I towed two full size motorcycles from Rockland County NY to St John's County Florida and back. I was really impressed with how smooth the truck towed. Here are some trip details:

Starting mileage- 1015 miles
Ending mileage- 3080 miles
Total towing mileage- 2065 miles

Total fuel used- 120 gallons
MPG while towing- 17.2

MPG determined by actual fuel use (started with a full tank-ended with a full tank) and miles driven. Dash display was off by 0.8 MPG (read 18).

Average speed was 70MPH, and we were stuck in DC traffic for just over 2 hours. A/C was used 70% of the time.

Here is a picture of the bikes on the trailer attached to the truck. The weight of the trailer is 550 lbs, each bike is approximately 1k lbs. I also threw in a picture in Key West :cool:
Bikes on trailer.jpg
Key West Marker.JPG
 

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I towed two full size motorcycles from Rockland County NY to St John's County Florida and back. I was really impressed with how smooth the truck towed.
Looks like it was a successful (and hopefully fun) trip. What year and model is your Ridgeline? That's a couple of nice Harleys you towed there and back!
 

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Vehicle is a 2019 Ridgeline.

Bikes are 2014 (black one) and 2016 (red one) HD Ultra Limited. We dropped the truck and trailer in Jacksonville and rode down the east coast of Florida to Key West, then out to Tamiami Trail up the west coast. Went to the north west tier, then across the state back to Jacksonvillle. Great trip!
 

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Wow - epic trip! Also, great demonstration of the RL towing capability. I don't have much towing experience, but 17.2 mpg with that load at a 70mph clip is definitely more than I would've guessed.
 

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Isn't great to have a truck that meets your needs and is a pleasure to drive. I drove from FL to Pa twice and its really nice on the road. My 82 year old M&D tell me " this rides nicer than our SUV" 18 Murano. Nice to get out off that cold weather too I bet.
 

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Wow - epic trip! Also, great demonstration of the RL towing capability. I don't have much towing experience, but 17.2 mpg with that load at a 70mph clip is definitely more than I would've guessed.
I agree. I have previously owned 3 trucks; a 2000 Ram 1500 short bed regular cab, 2002 F-150 super crew King Ranch, and a 2010 F-150 crew cab STX. I towed with all three and never gave it a thought. The F-150 STX was the best of that group. I had my reservations about the towing capacity of the RL, but I was pleasantly surprised at how well it towed the trailer. No sway, no vibration, and very little drag.

Isn't great to have a truck that meets your needs and is a pleasure to drive. I drove from FL to Pa twice and its really nice on the road. My 82 year old M&D tell me " this rides nicer than our SUV" 18 Murano. Nice to get out off that cold weather too I bet.
Yes it is! I also have a 2013 Civic that I kept instead of trading in as I thought I would continue to use the Civic as the daily driver. But the more I drive the RL, the more I want to drive it. I am thoroughly happy with this truck! And yes, it was pure pleasure to ride in near 80 degree weather as opposed to mid 30's.
 

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I agree. I have previously owned 3 trucks; a 2000 Ram 1500 short bed regular cab, 2002 F-150 super crew King Ranch, and a 2010 F-150 crew cab STX. I towed with all three and never gave it a thought. The F-150 STX was the best of that group. I had my reservations about the towing capacity of the RL, but I was pleasantly surprised at how well it towed the trailer. No sway, no vibration, and very little drag.



Yes it is! I also have a 2013 Civic that I kept instead of trading in as I thought I would continue to use the Civic as the daily driver. But the more I drive the RL, the more I want to drive it. I am thoroughly happy with this truck! And yes, it was pure pleasure to ride in near 80 degree weather as opposed to mid 30's.
Always glad to hear when Ridgeline owners discover the towing capabilities of this truck. We've owned three and each brought a smile to our face when towing - even in somewhat challenging circumstances. Our last Ridgeline was our '18 RTL-E, and we towed this ~4,600-4,700lb travel trailer for over 8,000 miles in the year and a half we owned that truck. Average mileage over that time were just under 11 mpgs (with a best ever at just over 13 - with wind always being the key factor). This pic is from a trip to Ohio in 2018 - hitched up and leaving an RV park in Zanesville on the way back to Texas. The truck managed rolling hills and long distances without a whimper.
400140


Now if you really want a smile on your face, just know that our RTL-E had absolutely no problem managing Bobcat Pass heading westbound into Red River, New Mexico. The summit is ~9,820', and our truck was a champ taking that grade - and giving the following F-150 no reason whatsoever to want to pass us (he wasn't towing anything, BTW).

400142


Similarly, descending Bobcat Pass into Red River was no problem. Just used D4 with only a few brake applications.

400143


You can't verbally convince people of the Ridgeline's true range of its capabilities . . . but pictures are worth a thousand words, you know . . . ;)
 

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Always glad to hear when Ridgeline owners discover the towing capabilities of this truck. We've owned three and each brought a smile to our face when towing - even in somewhat challenging circumstances. Our last Ridgeline was our '18 RTL-E, and we towed this ~4,600-4,700lb travel trailer for over 8,000 miles in the year and a half we owned that truck. Average mileage over that time were just under 11 mpgs (with a best ever at just over 13 - with wind always being the key factor). This pic is from a trip to Ohio in 2018 - hitched up and leaving an RV park in Zanesville on the way back to Texas. The truck managed rolling hills and long distances without a whimper. View attachment 400140

Now if you really want a smile on your face, just know that our RTL-E had absolutely no problem managing Bobcat Pass heading westbound into Red River, New Mexico. The summit is ~9,820', and our truck was a champ taking that grade - and giving the following F-150 no reason whatsoever to want to pass us (he wasn't towing anything, BTW).

View attachment 400142

Similarly, descending Bobcat Pass into Red River was no problem. Just used D4 with only a few brake applications.

View attachment 400143

You can't verbally convince people of the Ridgeline's true range of its capabilities . . . but pictures are worth a thousand words, you know . . . ;)
I too, have an 18 RTL-E, and am looking to buy a Travel Trailer with a heavier than normal weight rating. Can you tell me what year, make & model of TT of your set-up has, including how much weight in the TT itself, plus, if you have a weight distribution/sway bar ? It would be much appreciated!
 

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I too, have an 18 RTL-E, and am looking to buy a Travel Trailer with a heavier than normal weight rating. Can you tell me what year, make & model of TT of your set-up has, including how much weight in the TT itself, plus, if you have a weight distribution/sway bar ? It would be much appreciated!
Good Monday Morning to you, Gadgetguy. Would have replied sooner but actually just got back from a weekend camping trip with kids/grandkids in our rig. Great time, as always. I'll try to give you a helpful response.

First of all, I'm not really sure what you mean by your reference to "a Travel Trailer with a heavier than normal weight rating." So help me/everyone else with what you mean by "heavier than 'normal' weight rating." And by "weight rating" are you referring to the "CCC"; i.e. Cargo Carrying Capacity" of a proposed rig? Thanks for clarifying that.

At any rate, our rig is a 2016 Coachmen Freedom Express 192RBS. We bought it new in August, 2015. It would be best described as a classic "couple's camper." It is the second best seller among Coachmen's travel trailers (We are retired and so the two of us and our ~50 lb dog regularly enjoy both short and lengthy trips together.) We already had our second of our three Ridgelines (a 2011 RTL), and like you, we were looking for a suitable travel trailer match to tow. We took about one year to research the best rig to match our personal needs and our truck's capabilities.

From the required "yellow sticker" on the side of the camper here are its vital statistics: "Dry Weight" = 3,853 lbs (this is the weight of the rig from the factory floor - as equipped - without the added weight of propane, the weight of any water in the fresh water tank or any other equipment added on); "CCC" = 2,005 lbs (the maximum amount of weight the travel trailer can carry on its axles and frame - stuff you load on board; i.e. food, clothing, tools, fresh water, waste water, gear, etc.); exterior length = 22' 6"; exterior width = 96"; exterior height = 10' 3"; initial, advertised "hitch weight" = 392 lbs (this is actually a meaningless number on its own, since the actual hitch weight is determined once your rig is totally, completely loaded with "everything" on board as you are configured for an actual camping trip). The rig also has one "mini" slide that nicely expands the interior floor space; it also has a full size (80") queen size bed. You can go to Coachmen's RV site and see their current 192RBS model.

Our towing log reflects that our 2011 RTL towed that rig for 12,203 miles from August, 2015 through December, 2017 with an overall towing fuel efficiency of 9.13 mpg. We live in the greater Houston metro area, but our trips covered places like the Texas Hill Country, the Ozark Mountains, Mt. Rushmore/the Black Hills, the Lower Rio Grande Valley along the Mexican border, and a "gillion" places in between. That truck was an absolute, bullet-proof champ for towing. Because we were near the maximum towing ratings for the Ridgeline, we watched all of our weights very carefully. We particularly watched our Tongue Weights. We often weighed at a nearby CAT Scale to make sure we were still within the truck's capacity ratings. We found that a Tongue Weight of around 480 - 500 lbs was a sweet spot for the truck and trailer. (I did buy a Sherline Tongue Weight Scale to nail this critical weight. If off by much, we would literally move cargo around to better attain this number.)

Before we bought the trailer, because we were in the very upper regions of the Ridgeline's towing specs, we initially weighed literally everything that we might conceivably load on board the trailer. I mean everything! We wanted to know if our real world weights would fit into the truck's specs. And they did. We found that virtually every time we loaded up that we ended up with a camping-configured trailer weight of 4,600-4,700 lbs. Best practices for a tongue weight is 10%-15% of the trailer's weight, so our 480-500 lbs was on the low side of that. However, I cannot recall a single instance of instability, sway or lack of confidence in the truck's handling or performance. We did not use a weight distribution hitch. Our experience simply did not require it. We were not at all against using one, but because the truck and trailer worked so well together, we decided not to add the 60, 70, or 80 lbs or so that would take away from our payload capacity. Your choice.

We traded that RTL in December, 2018 for a 2018 RTL-E, and our towing experiences became even better. "Better" as in overall performance due to 30 more HP, 15 lbs/ft more of torque and an even better AWD system. Our RTL-E towed our travel trailer from January, 2018 through June, 2019 for 8,004 miles with an overall fuel efficiency of 10.85 mpg. We towed with that truck to eastern Ohio through the Midwest, various places around Texas and a wonderful trip I noted in the previous pictures last spring to northern New Mexico; i.e. Red River area. I can tell you that even after many miles of towing, as the driver, I did not feel "wearied" or worn down by the needed attention to the disciplines of towing. Some have complained a bit about the "nannies" of the RTL-E (and Black Edition), but I found things like the Lane Keep Assist and Road Departure Mitigation, Blind Spot Monitoring, Adaptive Cruise Control, etc. REALLY helped the towing experience. The navigation system seems to take a beating, but I can tell you that we have towed in some areas without cell service, so having a GPS based NAV system that never left us was a very comforting asset.

I could go on and on, and if you are so disposed , you could search on the threads I have posted in past years on our positive towing experiences with our Ridgeline(s). No need to bore you more than I have already. So why does my profile now show me as a previous Ridgeline owner? A good question that requires an honest answer. A combination of factors led us to search for an even more efficient tow vehicle that would fill the role of a daily driver with good comfort as well as tow our rig wherever we might want to go - with even better mpg in any case. No question that the Ridgeline was the best mid-size platform for lots of reasons. But the only way to achieve even better fuel efficiency in both daily driving AND towing was go the route of a different power plant. Throw in the season of life we are in that emphasizes being on the road even more and more with our trailer, and we looked around at our options. The typical gasoline engine 1/2 ton trucks out there would offer perhaps 1-2 mpg better towing mileage, but they would not match the Ridgeline's daily driver or non-towing highway mileage - not to mention all the unique advantages that the Ridge offers.

So the only option for us - at the time - was to find a gently used RAM 1500 Ecodiesel. And we did in July, 2019. (Buying one of the new 1/2 ton diesels available from either Ford or Chevy/GMC was not an option.) Traded in our beloved 2018 RTL-E. The RAM's coil spring suspension somewhat approaches the ride quality of the Ridgeline (though does not equal it); and its overall more robust body on frame construction does provide more margin in towing specs than the Ridgeline for the weights we were dealing with, and fuel efficiency is/has been almost "silly" good (30-31 mpg running around the Houston area's freeways and streets; 15 mpg when towing that same 192RBS travel trailer), not to mention the longevity of a diesel. So, for this season of our lives, mostly because we just wanted the most efficient "towing tool" reasonably available to us, we are the happy owners of a 2018 RAM 1500 Ecodiesel. But, we sure do notice other Ridgeline owners on the road and reminesce the great attributes of our Ridgeline.

One of these days, when our towing experiences lessen somewhat, we may well be back in a Ridge. But meanwhile, I can tell you, that if you stay within the Ridgeline's specifications, you will find a pleasurable and safe towing experience. I am just one of many on this forum who could share similar observations. If you have additional questions, feel free to PM me. I still do check in on this forum. Lots of good "virtual, digital friends" I've leaned from over the years. Plus, like I said, assuming that Honda keeps making them, my wife and I can easily see that we will be back in a Ridgeline one of these years down the road.
 

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Good Monday Morning to you, Gadgetguy. Would have replied sooner but actually just got back from a weekend camping trip with kids/grandkids in our rig. Great time, as always. I'll try to give you a helpful response.

First of all, I'm not really sure what you mean by your reference to "a Travel Trailer with a heavier than normal weight rating." So help me/everyone else with what you mean by "heavier than 'normal' weight rating." And by "weight rating" are you referring to the "CCC"; i.e. Cargo Carrying Capacity" of a proposed rig? Thanks for clarifying that.

At any rate, our rig is a 2016 Coachmen Freedom Express 192RBS. We bought it new in August, 2015. It would be best described as a classic "couple's camper." It is the second best seller among Coachmen's travel trailers (We are retired and so the two of us and our ~50 lb dog regularly enjoy both short and lengthy trips together.) We already had our second of our three Ridgelines (a 2011 RTL), and like you, we were looking for a suitable travel trailer match to tow. We took about one year to research the best rig to match our personal needs and our truck's capabilities.

From the required "yellow sticker" on the side of the camper here are its vital statistics: "Dry Weight" = 3,853 lbs (this is the weight of the rig from the factory floor - as equipped - without the added weight of propane, the weight of any water in the fresh water tank or any other equipment added on); "CCC" = 2,005 lbs (the maximum amount of weight the travel trailer can carry on its axles and frame - stuff you load on board; i.e. food, clothing, tools, fresh water, waste water, gear, etc.); exterior length = 22' 6"; exterior width = 96"; exterior height = 10' 3"; initial, advertised "hitch weight" = 392 lbs (this is actually a meaningless number on its own, since the actual hitch weight is determined once your rig is totally, completely loaded with "everything" on board as you are configured for an actual camping trip). The rig also has one "mini" slide that nicely expands the interior floor space; it also has a full size (80") queen size bed. You can go to Coachmen's RV site and see their current 192RBS model.

Our towing log reflects that our 2011 RTL towed that rig for 12,203 miles from August, 2015 through December, 2017 with an overall towing fuel efficiency of 9.13 mpg. We live in the greater Houston metro area, but our trips covered places like the Texas Hill Country, the Ozark Mountains, Mt. Rushmore/the Black Hills, the Lower Rio Grande Valley along the Mexican border, and a "gillion" places in between. That truck was an absolute, bullet-proof champ for towing. Because we were near the maximum towing ratings for the Ridgeline, we watched all of our weights very carefully. We particularly watched our Tongue Weights. We often weighed at a nearby CAT Scale to make sure we were still within the truck's capacity ratings. We found that a Tongue Weight of around 480 - 500 lbs was a sweet spot for the truck and trailer. (I did buy a Sherline Tongue Weight Scale to nail this critical weight. If off by much, we would literally move cargo around to better attain this number.)

Before we bought the trailer, because we were in the very upper regions of the Ridgeline's towing specs, we initially weighed literally everything that we might conceivably load on board the trailer. I mean everything! We wanted to know if our real world weights would fit into the truck's specs. And they did. We found that virtually every time we loaded up that we ended up with a camping-configured trailer weight of 4,600-4,700 lbs. Best practices for a tongue weight is 10%-15% of the trailer's weight, so our 480-500 lbs was on the low side of that. However, I cannot recall a single instance of instability, sway or lack of confidence in the truck's handling or performance. We did not use a weight distribution hitch. Our experience simply did not require it. We were not at all against using one, but because the truck and trailer worked so well together, we decided not to add the 60, 70, or 80 lbs or so that would take away from our payload capacity. Your choice.

We traded that RTL in December, 2018 for a 2018 RTL-E, and our towing experiences became even better. "Better" as in overall performance due to 30 more HP, 15 lbs/ft more of torque and an even better AWD system. Our RTL-E towed our travel trailer from January, 2018 through June, 2019 for 8,004 miles with an overall fuel efficiency of 10.85 mpg. We towed with that truck to eastern Ohio through the Midwest, various places around Texas and a wonderful trip I noted in the previous pictures last spring to northern New Mexico; i.e. Red River area. I can tell you that even after many miles of towing, as the driver, I did not feel "wearied" or worn down by the needed attention to the disciplines of towing. Some have complained a bit about the "nannies" of the RTL-E (and Black Edition), but I found things like the Lane Keep Assist and Road Departure Mitigation, Blind Spot Monitoring, Adaptive Cruise Control, etc. REALLY helped the towing experience. The navigation system seems to take a beating, but I can tell you that we have towed in some areas without cell service, so having a GPS based NAV system that never left us was a very comforting asset.

I could go on and on, and if you are so disposed , you could search on the threads I have posted in past years on our positive towing experiences with our Ridgeline(s). No need to bore you more than I have already. So why does my profile now show me as a previous Ridgeline owner? A good question that requires an honest answer. A combination of factors led us to search for an even more efficient tow vehicle that would fill the role of a daily driver with good comfort as well as tow our rig wherever we might want to go - with even better mpg in any case. No question that the Ridgeline was the best mid-size platform for lots of reasons. But the only way to achieve even better fuel efficiency in both daily driving AND towing was go the route of a different power plant. Throw in the season of life we are in that emphasizes being on the road even more and more with our trailer, and we looked around at our options. The typical gasoline engine 1/2 ton trucks out there would offer perhaps 1-2 mpg better towing mileage, but they would not match the Ridgeline's daily driver or non-towing highway mileage - not to mention all the unique advantages that the Ridge offers.

So the only option for us - at the time - was to find a gently used RAM 1500 Ecodiesel. And we did in July, 2019. (Buying one of the new 1/2 ton diesels available from either Ford or Chevy/GMC was not an option.) Traded in our beloved 2018 RTL-E. The RAM's coil spring suspension somewhat approaches the ride quality of the Ridgeline (though does not equal it); and its overall more robust body on frame construction does provide more margin in towing specs than the Ridgeline for the weights we were dealing with, and fuel efficiency is/has been almost "silly" good (30-31 mpg running around the Houston area's freeways and streets; 15 mpg when towing that same 192RBS travel trailer), not to mention the longevity of a diesel. So, for this season of our lives, mostly because we just wanted the most efficient "towing tool" reasonably available to us, we are the happy owners of a 2018 RAM 1500 Ecodiesel. But, we sure do notice other Ridgeline owners on the road and reminesce the great attributes of our Ridgeline.

One of these days, when our towing experiences lessen somewhat, we may well be back in a Ridge. But meanwhile, I can tell you, that if you stay within the Ridgeline's specifications, you will find a pleasurable and safe towing experience. I am just one of many on this forum who could share similar observations. If you have additional questions, feel free to PM me. I still do check in on this forum. Lots of good "virtual, digital friends" I've leaned from over the years. Plus, like I said, assuming that Honda keeps making them, my wife and I can easily see that we will be back in a Ridgeline one of these years down the road.
Thanks for getting back to me with all of your answers, as I appreciate you taking the time for such descriptive answers!

With regards to the question I asked you " a Travel Trailer with a "heavier than 'normal' weight rating." I guess what I meant to say was, with all the Newer TT's out there, getting heavier, with the same options on the vehicle, is it possible to tow, for example, a TT with a dry weight of 4200 lbs, and still load up the normal 800 - 1000 lbs of cargo ? I know the towing weight capacity states 5000 lbs, but I'm seeing many instances on this site where other owners have TT's that are heavier than even yours.

And, we just had a Major RV Show in Syracuse, this past weekend, so I drilled the sales staff of every possible maker of TT I was interested in, but never really got a clear answer as to how much TT was the maximum I could tow. As far as getting the best possible mileage while towing a TT, I would lean toward getting a TT than would be no more than 4000 lbs fully loaded. I really like all the technology that my '18 RTL-E has to offer & would like to keep this vehicle as my Tow vehicle.

I've owned a '07 TrailManor 2720SL & towed with a 2011 Honda Pilot, and never had any issues, but then again, the TM's dry weight was under 2865, & with just a weekend camping trip. So our extras that we are carrying was only about 300 lbs of extra weight. I don't have that TT anymore , because I gave it to my Ex in the settlement
 

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Thanks for getting back to me with all of your answers, as I appreciate you taking the time for such descriptive answers!

With regards to the question I asked you " a Travel Trailer with a "heavier than 'normal' weight rating." I guess what I meant to say was, with all the Newer TT's out there, getting heavier, with the same options on the vehicle, is it possible to tow, for example, a TT with a dry weight of 4200 lbs, and still load up the normal 800 - 1000 lbs of cargo? I know the towing weight capacity states 5000 lbs, but I'm seeing many instances on this site where other owners have TT's that are heavier than even yours.

And, we just had a Major RV Show in Syracuse, this past weekend, so I drilled the sales staff of every possible maker of TT I was interested in, but never really got a clear answer as to how much TT was the maximum I could tow. As far as getting the best possible mileage while towing a TT, I would lean toward getting a TT than would be no more than 4000 lbs fully loaded. I really like all the technology that my '18 RTL-E has to offer & would like to keep this vehicle as my Tow vehicle.

I've owned a '07 TrailManor 2720SL & towed with a 2011 Honda Pilot, and never had any issues, but then again, the TM's dry weight was under 2865, & with just a weekend camping trip. So our extras that we are carrying was only about 300 lbs of extra weight. I don't have that TT anymore, because I gave it to my Ex in the settlement
I have another question. What model of the 2018 Ram 1500 Ecodiesel do you have? Eg., Big Horn, Lone Star, etc., Quad or Crew Cab, 4x2 or 4x4 & what is your Towing capacity?
 

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Thanks for getting back to me with all of your answers, as I appreciate you taking the time for such descriptive answers!

With regards to the question I asked you " a Travel Trailer with a "heavier than 'normal' weight rating." I guess what I meant to say was, with all the Newer TT's out there, getting heavier, with the same options on the vehicle, is it possible to tow, for example, a TT with a dry weight of 4200 lbs, and still load up the normal 800 - 1000 lbs of cargo ? I know the towing weight capacity states 5000 lbs, but I'm seeing many instances on this site where other owners have TT's that are heavier than even yours.

And, we just had a Major RV Show in Syracuse, this past weekend, so I drilled the sales staff of every possible maker of TT I was interested in, but never really got a clear answer as to how much TT was the maximum I could tow. As far as getting the best possible mileage while towing a TT, I would lean toward getting a TT than would be no more than 4000 lbs fully loaded. I really like all the technology that my '18 RTL-E has to offer & would like to keep this vehicle as my Tow vehicle.

I've owned a '07 TrailManor 2720SL & towed with a 2011 Honda Pilot, and never had any issues, but then again, the TM's dry weight was under 2865, & with just a weekend camping trip. So our extras that we are carrying was only about 300 lbs of extra weight. I don't have that TT anymore , because I gave it to my Ex in the settlement
The Ridgeline's towing specs (among others) were probably a function of engineers and attorneys sitting around a table and reaching some kind of compromise to allow for marketability and also to mitigate liability. The reality is that both G1 and G2 Ridgelines were probably under-rated for real world capability. That said, you are on track with the probable amounts of cargo you might load on board for a typical trip. We usually end up with about 800 lbs of "stuff" on board - whether we head out for a long trip (like last Spring's month long trip to the southern Rockies/Sangre de Cristo Mountains in northern New Mexico) or multiple shorter, two or three night ventures. We have standard gear we keep on board and then pack additional stuff appropriate for that particular trip (winter vs. summer, for instance). So yes, the Ridgeline is capable of towing more than the 5,000 lbs specified. How much more? I don't even want to hazard a guess.

A couple of critical factors come into play: (1) braking and stopping the ensemble is paramount in importance (ergo a good electronic brake controller in the truck is obviously mandatory): (2) wind resistance for a full profile travel trailer like ours is the constant battle against fuel efficiency and stability (in the case of crosswinds, for instance). RV folks talk about "pulling a billboard sideways against the wind" as an illustration of the work a truck has in towing a rig like ours. Wind is the biggest factor to consider - aside from the various weight specs to abide by (tongue weight and payload being more important even than trailer weight). Slowing down and being patient helps with mileage and stability. We usually set our cruise control at 60-62 mph - or a bit less depending upon conditions. We also made use of D4 whenever the tranny wanted to constantly shift - even on level ground when the winds were fighting us. And we certainly used D4 in hilly terrain. It makes a positive difference and will aid your transmission's longevity.

So since we always operated in the very upper regions of the Ridgeline's stated capabilities, we more than often weighed at a CAT Scale the night before a departure - fully fueled and fully packed with everything in the truck and trailer (including our dog) to obtain an accurate, certified set of weights. There is the consideration of liability in the case of an accident, so there is that to consider. But I can only state that our experience across a range of towing regimes with our trailer and our '18 RTL-E was extremely positive. We always stayed within the truck's specs.

RV salesmen are generally not the best source of matching a rig to a particular truck - as you can certify. But you are already doing good research to nail down what you will get, so good on you.
 

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The Ridgeline's towing specs (among others) were probably a function of engineers and attorneys sitting around a table and reaching some kind of compromise to allow for marketability and also to mitigate liability. The reality is that both G1 and G2 Ridgelines were probably under-rated for real world capability. That said, you are on track with the probably amounts of cargo you might load on board for a typical trip. We usually end up with about 800 lbs of "stuff" on board - whether we head out for a long trip (like last Spring's month long trip to the southern Rockies/Sangre de Cristo Mountains in northern New Mexico) or multiple shorter, two or three night ventures. We have standard gear we keep on board and then pack additional stuff appropriate for that particular trip (winter vs. summer, for instance). So yes, the Ridgeline is capable of towing more than the 5,000 lbs specified. How much more? I don't even want to hazard a guess.

A couple of critical factors come into play: (1) braking and stopping the ensemble is paramount in importance (ergo a good electronic brake controller in the truck is obviously mandatory): (2) wind resistance for a full profile travel trailer like ours is the constant battle against fuel efficiency and stability (in the case of crosswinds, for instance). RV folks talk about "pulling a billboard sideways against the wind" as an illustration of the work a truck has in towing a rig like ours. Wind is the biggest factor to consider - aside from the various weight specs to abide by (tongue weight and payload being more important even than trailer weight). Slowing down and being patient helps with mileage and stability. We usually set our cruise control at 60-62 mph - or a bit less depending upon conditions. We also made use of D4 whenever the tranny wanted to constantly shift - even on level ground when the winds were fighting us. And we certainly used D4 in hilly terrain. It makes a positive difference and will aid your transmission's longevity.

So since we always operated in the very upper regions of the Ridgeline's stated capabilities, we more than often weighed at a CAT Scale the night before a departure - fully fueled and fully packed with everything in the truck and trailer (including our dog) to obtain an accurate, certified set of weights. There is the consideration of liability in the case of an accident, so there is that to consider. But I can only state that our experience across a range of towing regimes with our trailer and our '18 RTL-E was extremely positive. We always stayed within the truck's specs.

RV salesmen are generally not the best source of matching a rig to a particular truck - as you can certify. But you are already doing good research to nail down what you will get, so good on you.
Thanks again, for your honesty & for getting back to me in a timely manner!

I wondered if I may ask what Model your current tow vehicle '18 Ram 1500 Ecodiesel is? Eg., Big Horn, Lonestar, Quad or Crew Cab, 4x2 or 4x4?
 

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I have another question. What model of the 2018 Ram 1500 Ecodiesel do you have? Eg., Big Horn, Lone Star, etc., Quad or Crew Cab, 4x2 or 4x4 & what is your Towing capacity?
We found a "gently used" RAM 1500 Lone Star with 22,160 miles on the OD. Hardly anything for a diesel. It is a 4 X 2 with a 3:55 rear differential. Towing capacity for this configuration is 7,860 lbs. If we had found a 3:92 rear diff the towing capacity would have been more, but we didn't need that. Likewise, if we had found a 4 X 4 the payload would have been less due to the added weight on the frame. But the key metric to watch for with any mid-size or 1/2 ton pickup is "payload." (You typically run out of payload before you reach a truck's towing capacity.) Our RAM comes close, but does not meet our RTL-E's payload (often the case with RAM due to their coil spring rear suspension - typically good ride but less than the competition's payload rating). Our RAM payload per the yellow sticker in the driver's door jamb is 1,420 lbs. Our '18 RTL-E was rated at 1,477 lbs. I would have walked away from that trade if that RAM's payload had been much less the what we have. That's one of several reasons that the Ridgeline shines in towing.

As it turns out, we still miss the Ridgeline's ride, comfort, outstanding AWD, "nannies," - even the color - loved that Forest Mist Metallic. But again, the only reason we opted to trade was that we are in a season wherein we tow/camp a good deal, and the performance of this small diesel is/has been outstanding. I do my own minor maintenance (oil, filter's, etc.) to save money over and against outrageous dealer charges, and don't worry about creating a spreadsheet comparing the overall economics of gas vs. diesel. We just value the "tool" it is for us in these days. But I look forward to the day that a future, new Ridgeline will be in our garage again.
 
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