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I have search a bit but didnt find a specific tread to answer my question! If you know a tread about it point it to me please!

Ok, I owned a g1 2007 for 7 years now. Loved the truck. I am towing my race car with it once in a while (4000lbs car and trailer) and I xan say that I never really had any problems at all. Now my horse has around 140k miles on it and Im thinking about getting something newer. I am wondering how good is the newer one g2 compare to the g1...

I have been told that the g2 is less built strong for towing (i.e. the axles are apparently less big and strong). Anyone has owned the g1 before and got the g2 and could comment, review about towing that kind of loads?

Thanks in advance for helping!
 

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Here is a nice comparison of the two by someone who owned both. He prefers the G2.

 

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I was going to second the G2 though I do not have a G2.

Engine has better programming and design enabling towing without the need for premium fuel. Gas mileage is better as well.

However, do know G2 has its own deal of issues.

Have you thought about investing in a vehicle just for towing?
 

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Engine has better programming and design enabling towing without the need for premium fuel.
Wouldn't using premium fuel while towing with a G2 have the same benefits of premium fuel in a G1?

I'm thinking of a post by Gary Flint where he discusses premium fuel, power torque and even transmission temperature. I'll be darned if I can find it. Searches bring up old links that no longer work. But I did find a post by @speedlever that cites the original post.

On edit. here is a thread that talks about premium fuel in a G2
 

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Wouldn't using premium fuel while towing with a G2 have the same benefits of premium fuel in a G1?

I'm thinking of a post by Gary Flint where he discusses premium fuel, power torque and even transmission temperature. I'll be darned if I can find it. Searches bring up old links that no longer work. But I did find a post by @speedlever that cites the original post.
Maybe this thread?:
 

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I have a 2018 RTL and tow my track car (Miata) on a U-haul trailer (total 4800ish lbs) out of Houston up into the hill country or out to track days with no problem. On the highway, with the trailer, I'm averaging 17mpg and the whole thing tracks great, accelerates smoothly and doesn't have any weird shift points. I love this truck!
 

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Probably wrong about modern engines, and would welcome some clarification. I'm working from knowledge gathered during days of vacuum and spring advance/retard distributors and carburetors.

In modern cars, the Computer will adjust the timing for various condition from warm up thru normal and abnormal operating temps. The timing will also advance and retard during various engine demands such as moving away from a traffic light versus cruising.
There is a built in maximum timing advance which is presumably when the warm engine is at optimum rpm with little load. Running premium fuel will not result in the timing going over that maximum advance. .It will help to maintain a more normal advance under stress, because the engine is less likely to "Ping" or "knock". If either of those is detected by a sensor, the timing is retarded, to protect the engine.

At higher rpm we want the plugs to fire early, before the piston reaches top of the cylinder so the "Explosion " or fire wall occurs as the piston tops out.

Premium pump fuel that we purchase is not more powerful than regular. It simply has more octane which effectively slows down the way the fuel ignites. The engine under higher than "normal" stress will run higher temps in the combustion chambers and can result in the fuel pre-igniting. That with the plugs firing in a fully advanced state may cause "Knock". and the timing is retarded to fire the plugs later. With higher octane , pre-ignition is less likely to happen. So timing can remain more normal. MPG will be better if the timing can remain as normal as possible.

FWIW: The owners manual for my 09 RL says to use premium fuel when towing. Especially in the mountains or very hot temperatures and heavy loads. It also says that WDHs are not recommended.

k
 

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Just towed for the first time with G2 Black Edition. Trailer is a 2008 Trail Sport by R-Vision, 3000 lbs dry with 200 lbs of load inside of it. Although I never towed with my G1, I can compare to my 2014 Ram Ecodiesel. Overall I was happy with the experience, however I would concur with many online reviewers that stated that a tall trailer can cause problems. I felt a little tossed around in cross winds for sure. Acceleration was no problem, and the temperature never rose during our 1.5 hour trip (one way). Last summer when we purchased the trailer we towed with the EcoDiesel. It was constantly overheating (which is a known problem with that engine). The benefit was it barely felt like I was towing anything with the massive amount of torque it had. Back to this past weekend: I had assumed I would get about twice as bad economy as I do without a trailer, and that is about what it got. Normally with 50/50 mixed city / hwy driving, I get 11.5 l/100KM, and achieved around 22.5 l/100 KM towing that load. Not super happy with that but I guess that is what it gets.
 

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Overall I was happy with the experience, however I would concur with many online reviewers that stated that a tall trailer can cause problems. I felt a little tossed around in cross winds for sure.
You may find that redistributing the load in the trailer to increase the tongue weight bias (approaching 15% rather than the minimum recommended 10% of loaded total trailer weight) would help that situation.

Since you use an 'equalizer' hitch you will be able to adjust/offset the slightly increased un-equalized sag, there's no penalty in trying it.

Working with actual scale-weights (as opposed to guestimates / mfr published data) can be beneficial.

Just for your consideration, happy trailering!
 

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There is a built in maximum timing advance which is presumably when the warm engine is at optimum rpm with little load. Running premium fuel will not result in the timing going over that maximum advance. .
ECUs and PCMs have fuel and ignition tables loaded in and engine operation and reference is based on the air that is ingested (volume and temp). It goes without saying that there is always a maximum, and minimum on the tables which the engine operates within.

Premium pump fuel that we purchase is not more powerful than regular. It simply has more octane which effectively slows down the way the fuel ignites. The engine under higher than "normal" stress will run higher temps in the combustion chambers and can result in the fuel pre-igniting. T
I believe what you meant to say is that the various grades of gasoline, all have the same specific energy. Specific energy is energy per unit mass; aka energy density. Octane is a rating, not a content of gasoline (your sentence construction above implies as such). Octane number of fuels signifies its resistance to auto-ignition.
  • For example Methanol has 19.7MJ/kg while gasoline has 46.4MJ/kg, while E85 is 33.1MJ/kg. However Methanol has an Octane rating of 110 and up, while gasoline (pump gas) is in the low to mid 90s and E85 is said to be around 102~105. That it why, traditionally, 'they' say that you burn twice as much 'fuel' in the same engine, when you run pure alcohol, to produce the same amount of power.
BTW Octane does not slow down the fuel ignition, the fuel ignites the same 'way'. Under compression, the lower octane fuel will combust sooner than the one with a higher octane rating.. Higher Octane fuel is great for engine tuners as they have more of a bandwidth to play with as the intake air temperature dictates much of the ignition characteristics.

We will discuss Auto-ignition temperatures for another time :)
 

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You may find that redistributing the load in the trailer to increase the tongue weight bias (approaching 15% rather than the minimum recommended 10% of loaded total trailer weight) would help that situation.

Since you use an 'equalizer' hitch you will be able to adjust/offset the slightly increased un-equalized sag, there's no penalty in trying it.

Working with actual scale-weights (as opposed to guestimates / mfr published data) can be beneficial.

Just for your consideration, happy trailering!
Thanks ! Its a bit of a challenge as the fridge is in the middle of the trailer, but we’ll do our best to get some weight towards the front next time
 
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