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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2019 RTL-E which I really like. I’m considering buying a lightweight travel trailer that would likely have a towing weight of up to 4500 lbs. our intention is to use it to tour the western states (from the East coast) .and National Parks. So an extended trip of many miles and varied terrain, with a big, high box behind. Am I crazy to consider doing this with a Ridgeline, or should I just buy an F150 or something with a 10K tow rating to be safe?
 

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What do you use the truck for the rest of the year?

For a travel trailer, I'd shoot for 3500lbs empty, that will give you 4500-4800 when loaded up for travel. Then you might consider adding an additional transmission cooler (at least keep an eye on trans temps). It might also help to tow in D4.

Yes, it's a hassle, but so is living with a full-size truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What do you use the truck for the rest of the year?

For a travel trailer, I'd shoot for 3500lbs empty, that will give you 4500-4800 when loaded up for travel. Then you might consider adding an additional transmission cooler (at least keep an eye on trans temps). It might also help to tow in D4.

Yes, it's a hassle, but so is living with a full-size truck.
What do you use the truck for the rest of the year?

For a travel trailer, I'd shoot for 3500lbs empty, that will give you 4500-4800 when loaded up for travel. Then you might consider adding an additional transmission cooler (at least keep an eye on trans temps). It might also help to tow in D4.

Yes, it's a hassle, but so is living with a full-size truck.
Thank you Longboat. Most use of this truck is more as a car or suv. Travel and around town. I can get this vehicle in my garage. A full size PU won’t go.
 

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It appears that the biggest issue with the Honda 6AT transmission is insufficient cooling when towing heavy at slower speeds, such as stop-n-go traffic. If I were towing heavy, I would try to avoid traffic. Perhaps leave earlier in the morning, avoid rush hours, etc. If the truck is moving, the tranny is cooling.

You might also consider changing trans fluid often, even as much as every oil change. It is easy to do and changes out just a portion of the fluid. It would take four fluid changes to get close to 90% of the fluid changed out, so changing with every oil change will help keep fluid fresh over time. Once the fluid is burned, it doesn't cool the trans as well.

Some have added auxiliary fans and coolers to their transmissions, and these seem to help when towing. There are several threads going around about those issues now.
 

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There’s only one way to tell TFTs under any/all towing/driving conditions......monitor TFT. Never hurts to frequently pull the tranny dipstick and observe fluid level/color. (here we go)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There’s only one way to tell TFTs under any/all towing/driving conditions......monitor TFT. Never hurts to frequently pull the tranny dipstick and observe fluid level/color. (here we go)
Thank you for all the responses. While it sounds like a Ridgeline can pull a heavy weight, it may be better to use a vehicle that has a much higher towing capacity to avoid the problems of pushing it to the maximum.
 

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I have a 2020 Keystone Passport 239ML, and its a bit much for my Ridgeline. Sadly enough, I am selling the RL and getting a Nissan Titan with the 5.6 V8 to ease my towing concerns. The RL struggles to keep up with traffic on highways going 65-70 MPG, especially in Central PA where the hills are steep.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have a 2020 Keystone Passport 239ML, and its a bit much for my Ridgeline. Sadly enough, I am selling the RL and getting a Nissan Titan with the 5.6 V8 to ease my towing concerns. The RL struggles to keep up with traffic on highways going 65-70 MPG, especially in Central PA where the hills are steep.
Thanks js010, your experience is what I’m concerned about. I don’t want to head out on a 5000 plus mile trip worried if the vehicle can do it. I appreciate your comment.
 

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The 2020 Ridgeline would make a better towing platform. It has a lower first gear, more gears to choose from while towing, and most importantly, the ability to select and hold the gear you want with the paddle shifters.

So far, we have not heard of any overheating issues with the ZF 9-spd trans in the 2020 G2.

When towing heavy, I would keep engine rpms up around 4500-5500. Those are scary numbers for the old V8 engines, but the Honda V6 will handle those numbers all day long.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The 2020 Ridgeline would make a better towing platform. It has a lower first gear, more gears to choose from while towing, and most importantly, the ability to select and hold the gear you want with the paddle shifters.

So far, we have not heard of any overheating issues with the ZF 9-spd trans in the 2020 G2.

When towing heavy, I would keep engine rpms up around 4500-5500. Those are scary numbers for the old V8 engines, but the Honda V6 will handle those numbers all day long.
Thanks Longboat, I’ll look into the 2020. I think that’s the transmission that’s in my son’s newer Pilot.
 

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I frequently wonder why people tow their RV at 65-70 mph. Most (not all) of the RV's I see being towed at or above the speed limit seems to be operated by inexperienced drivers judging by their actions. The same thing with those giant bus/RVs.
 

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Slowing down a little.....what a novel idea. (y) (y)
 

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I frequently wonder why people tow their RV at 65-70 mph. Most (not all) of the RV's I see being towed at or above the speed limit seems to be operated by inexperienced drivers judging by their actions. The same thing with those giant bus/RVs.
Back in the good old days when you were lucky to get 200HP out of a full size truck with a V8 you had to plan ahead and wind up if you saw a considerable hill ahead, and even then you’d be lucky to be doing 1/3 of that speed when you reached the top. Pickup trucks nowadays you can not only gain speed uphill while towing a much too large and unsafe TT, you can pass slower traffic if you feel like it, because why not? Twin turbos and mountains of torque let any idiot tow things unsafely.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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I frequently wonder why people tow their RV at 65-70 mph. Most (not all) of the RV's I see being towed at or above the speed limit seems to be operated by inexperienced drivers judging by their actions. The same thing with those giant bus/RVs.
From page 414 of the 2017 OM:

404995
 

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Taking a “test tow” this weekend for a short camping trip and hoping the 2020 will handle this. The Retro 189R is around 23’ overall and 3750# dry. My 2017 Ram 1500 did the job just fine, but for day to day driving and parking, a real pain. We shall see.
405035
 

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Let us know how you make out!
Will do! I have a pretty major grade heading towards Chattanooga and combined with the heat, this should be a good indicator of whether or not Honda is serious about this N.A.R.T.
 
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