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RIDGELINE Towing info
From the owners manual:
2 occupants, 5000 lb, 600 lb max tongue weight
3 occupants, 4750 lb, 600 lb max tongue weight
4 occupants, 4750 lb, 570 lb max tongue weight
5 occupants, 4500 lb, 516 lb max tongue weight

The corresponding weight limits assume occupants fill seats from the front of the vehicle to the back, each occupant weighs 150 lb and each has 15 lb of cargo in the cab, pickup bed, or in-Bed Trunk. Any additional weight, including cargo and accessories, reduces the maximum trailer weight and maximum tongue load. Never exceed the gross axle weight ratings.

My question....

If I had 4 occupants (lets assume the above statement about peoples weight and how much gear they each had) and was towing something that weighed 4750 lbs but only had a 250lb tongue weight....since I would be under the 570 lb tongue weight....will that allow me to use that addtional 320 lbs for other gear?? Of course I would never carry the max but was just wondering if by not using up all the max tongue weight on a trailer could I use the leftover capacity elsewhere.

Thanks....sorry if you guys think this is a stupid question.....
 

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Let's look at a Ridgeline RTS for example.

GCVWR (Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating) is 10085 lbs.
GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight) is 6050 lbs.
Curb Weight (with hitch): 4520 lbs.

So if you take the GCVWR - Curb Weight you end up with 5565 lbs. available for the trailer and additional vehicle cargo and passengers.

If we take that 5565 lbs. and subtract the maximum trailer weight of 5000 lbs. we end up with 565 lbs.

So when towing a 5000 lb. trailer you could have any combination of driver, passengers and/or cargo up to 565 lbs. in the Ridgeline.

As you reduce the trailer weight you can add more weight for passengers and cargo up to the 6050 lb. GVW. If we subtract the Curb Weight from the GVW we see that the RTS is capable of up to 1530 lbs. for the driver, passengers, and cargo if not pulling a trailer over 4035 lbs. (but still assuming the weight of the hitch is installed).

So the maximum load for a Ridgeline RTS is 1530 lbs. for the driver, passengers, and vehicle cargo, plus a 4035 lb. trailer. Reducing the trailer weight does not allow us to carry more than 1530 lbs. in the Ridgeline.

Hope this covers all the angles.

The tongue weight spec. is a maximum only... you don't add it to the trailer or vehicle weight.

The other models vary only slightly.

Hope this helps!
 

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Joe, you should change the title and make this post a sticky.
 

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New Ridgy owner, 2008 RT, w/OEM hitch and bug deflector. Have a Trail Lite Cruiser 3,485 lbs. travel trailer and loaded will be around 4,200 lbs. I will be heading west this summer from florida to the western mountains of colorado and oregon. Researched the truck extensively and feel very comfortable with my setup. Purchased for $20,500, less my Honda 2004 Element trade in of $7,100. Remember, "HONDA IS THE POWER OF DREAMS".
 

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This may be a silly question but does installing the 2" lift affect the trucks towing capabilities?
 

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Great Information. Sticky Please!!!
 

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First, csimo, your information is always outstanding... I wanna say thank you.
Now for my question...

Let's look at a Ridgeline RTS for example.

GCVWR (Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating) is 10085 lbs.
GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight) is 6050 lbs.
Curb Weight (with hitch): 4520 lbs.



...The tongue weight spec. is a maximum only... you don't add it to the trailer or vehicle weight.

At the risk of embarrassing myself for missing something, I'm not gonna PM you... I'm gonna ask this here, in case other people (at least ONE person, lol!) are as confused as me.

:rolleyes:

My questions is about tongue weight. I find it a little confusing that you wrote "you don't add it to the vehicle or trailer weight"... For full clarification, do you subtract the tongue weight from GCVWR? When you pull onto the scales and figure out your tongue weight, do you subtract that from the overall number? I had figured it was included, because it's still weight that adds to the entire combined rig.

However, the math doesn't work out if that's the case (doesn't work out if it IS included). Your math above DOES work if it's not.

If it IS included:
10085 GCVWR minus
5000 Trailer GVW minus
600 Trailer tongue weight minus
4520 Ridgeline curb weight equals
_______________________
= -35 lbs

That's a deficit of 35 lbs. And that's without a driver and 140ish lbs. of fuel. (forget clothes and anything else).

The reason I'm asking is because it doesn't make sense to me. Page 208 of the manual (2006 RTL) says:

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
(GVWR) - The maximum
allowable weight of the vehicle, all
occupants, all cargo, and the tongue
load is 6,050 lbs (2,745 kg).


Please help me understand this. I'm trying to figure what I'm missing and where to make sense of it. Some websites I read that it DOES include tongue, others say (like you) that it does not. Most don't mention it and I'm going blind trying to work the math out on every one to deduce a consensus.

I want to drive and tow safely. My trailer weighed in at 4360 loaded (*and that's loaded a little more than it will be on most future trips due to circumstance). I was very happy with my tongue weight of 550 (towed beautifully and smoothly with just a friction sway bar - no WDH). Seemed reasonable that the Ridgeline weighed in at 5200 with me, gear, and a full fuel tank. It seemed like I fell into all of the right parameters. But, then I'm still a bit panicked, because the combined weight (10110) was 25 lbs. "over" the total (my manual actually says 10088 not 10085, but three lbs is neither here nor there in relative terms).

If people don't detach each time to figure out tongue weight to be able to subtract that from the total weight, do they then really know what the GCVWR they're working with actually is?

Forgive me if this is stupid, or if I misunderstood something. The more I think about it, the more it drives me nuts. So I finally had to ask. Just wanna be safe and responsible! Even if other folks might be giggling right now.

Thanks!
 

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My questions is about tongue weight. I find it a little confusing that you wrote "you don't add it to the vehicle or trailer weight"... For full clarification, do you subtract the tongue weight from GCVWR? When you pull onto the scales and figure out your tongue weight, do you subtract that from the overall number? I had figured it was included, because it's still weight that adds to the entire combined rig.
The tongue weight is just a limiting factor, not part of the calculation. You could tow a 5,000 lb. trailer with 500 lb. of tongue weight, or you could tow a 2000 lb. trailer with 500 lb. of tongue weight (not ideal). As long as you don't exceed the maximum tongue weight rating you're fine.

The tongue weight is not directly part of the GCVWR.

You could come up with a scenario of a 5000 lb. trailer with 100 lb. of tongue weight (but it would probably sway badly).
 

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So, that means that my combo is a happy (albeit heavy) combo...

*phew!*

Thanks so much.:)

In theory, this also means the Honda manual is incorrect when it adds the tongue load into the 6050 lb truck limit... that's what was throwing me off the most.
 

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The tongue weight is just a limiting factor, not part of the calculation. You could tow a 5,000 lb. trailer with 500 lb. of tongue weight, or you could tow a 2000 lb. trailer with 500 lb. of tongue weight (not ideal). As long as you don't exceed the maximum tongue weight rating you're fine.

The tongue weight is not directly part of the GCVWR.

You could come up with a scenario of a 5000 lb. trailer with 100 lb. of tongue weight (but it would probably sway badly).
This might be alittle late in the game,but you also have to make sure you are using the DROP on your ball mount to make sure you are towing the trailer LEVEL. Very important in preventing a bad sway problem with any weight trailer.
 

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One other consideration on tongue weight.

If the tongue weight is too light you will have less control on the trailer, and the trailer hitch will bounce around more. The weight must be sufficient to prevent this and to prevent the trailer from trying to jump off the ball going over bumps, etc.

On the other hand, too much tongue weight puts excessive strain on the truck and consumes its carrying capacity.

So it is a balanceing act, enough to safely tow, not to much to damage truck.

Walter
 

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I have a question. I recently removed and reinstalled my hitch for powdercoating. There was a 8-10ga wire that was attached to the drivers side of the hitch. It didn't go anywhere and was just cut off? what is this for? is it hot?
 

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I have a question. I recently removed and reinstalled my hitch for powdercoating. There was a 8-10ga wire that was attached to the drivers side of the hitch. It didn't go anywhere and was just cut off? what is this for? is it hot?
Was this after you got it back from the PCer or when you removed it?

If after it came back, then it was just used to suspend the hitch when they spray (used loosely) or when they hung it in the oven.


-Terracar
 
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