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This is an old thread, but I'd like everybody's opinion at this time. Will the hitch adequately support a 450# motorcycle, and will the rear suspension handle it without too much sag? Thanks. FWIW, mine has a sticker that says 500#/225 kg
 

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I think it would depend on how far the rack protrudes. You cold get a lot of leverage on the hitch with a 450lb bike if it hangs off the back 3 feet. I would imagine that if you hit a big bump, you could put a lot more than 500 lbs down pressure. OTOH, one would think the hitch has that factored in on the load limit because a trailer would have a similar effect over bumps. If you already have the carrier, throw it on and drive around slowly and see how it feels/looks.
 

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No, I don't have the carrier, and I didn't want to get it if it would put too much strain on the Ridge.
This sounds like a sport bike by the weight. I use my Ridgeline (bought it, actually) to take my bike(s) to the track, and they work very well inside the bed. I'd spend the money on a good set of ramps instead of a carrier. More of a pain, but I really don't like the dynamics of those hitch carriers. But you are technically within spec with the setup you describe. Barely.



KeS
 

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No, actually it's an adventure bike-Tiger 800XC. I do have ramps, but it's a hell of a lot easier to get it in than out.DAHIK.
 

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^ Kevin is that an S1000rr on the bed? I got the Ridgeline for the same reason, mainly for bike transport to the track. Northeast area. My buddies 3 of them also have Ridgelines,you can fit both bikes in the ridgeline.

My question on the wiring harness, the Ridgeline I got had a Curt Class 3 hitch installed but no wiring harness. I was thinking of getting the Honda OEM version. If you're trailering with brakes, how are the brakes applied on the trailer. Does pressing the Ridgeline brakes activate the trailer brakes as well? Do you need any separate brake controller or is the OEM included.

Also is it safe to tap into the hitch to install the OEM bracket for the hitch harness plug since the Curt doesn't have anywhere to attach the bracket to?
 

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^ Kevin is that an S1000rr on the bed? I got the Ridgeline for the same reason, mainly for bike transport to the track. Northeast area. My buddies 3 of them also have Ridgelines,you can fit both bikes in the ridgeline.

My question on the wiring harness, the Ridgeline I got had a Curt Class 3 hitch installed but no wiring harness. I was thinking of getting the Honda OEM version. If you're trailering with brakes, how are the brakes applied on the trailer. Does pressing the Ridgeline brakes activate the trailer brakes as well? Do you need any separate brake controller or is the OEM included.

Also is it safe to tap into the hitch to install the OEM bracket for the hitch harness plug since the Curt doesn't have anywhere to attach the bracket to?
Yes, that's my now-ex S1000RR. The biggest bike I've seen pics of back there was an ST1x00.

You can tap into the hitch for the OEM bracket, but I found it neater to buy an L-bracket from E-trailer, mount it with the supplied hose clamps, and remount the factory connectors onto it. Looks very clean.

The OEM wiring provides a relayed, plugin connection point for a 3rd party brake controller such as a Prodigy, but doesn't include a controller in the package. If you choose to go with tail/brake light wiring, you'd have to figure out a way to tap into it to power a controller.

KeS
 

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First, csimo, your information is always outstanding... I wanna say thank you.
snip
My questions is about tongue weight. I find it a little confusing that you wrote "you don't add it to the vehicle or trailer weight"... For full clarification, do you subtract the tongue weight from GCVWR? When you pull onto the scales and figure out your tongue weight, do you subtract that from the overall number? I had figured it was included, because it's still weight that adds to the entire combined rig.

However, the math doesn't work out if that's the case (doesn't work out if it IS included). Your math above DOES work if it's not.

If it IS included:
10085 GCVWR minus
5000 Trailer GVW minus
600 Trailer tongue weight minus
4520 Ridgeline curb weight equals
_______________________
= -35 lbs

That's a deficit of 35 lbs. And that's without a driver and 140ish lbs. of fuel. (forget clothes and anything else).

The reason I'm asking is because it doesn't make sense to me. Page 208 of the manual (2006 RTL) says:

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
(GVWR) - The maximum
allowable weight of the vehicle, all
occupants, all cargo, and the tongue
load is 6,050 lbs (2,745 kg).


Please help me understand this. I'm trying to figure what I'm missing and where to make sense of it. Some websites I read that it DOES include tongue, others say (like you) that it does not. Most don't mention it and I'm going blind trying to work the math out on every one to deduce a consensus.

snip
The tongue weight is just a limiting factor, not part of the calculation. You could tow a 5,000 lb. trailer with 500 lb. of tongue weight, or you could tow a 2000 lb. trailer with 500 lb. of tongue weight (not ideal). As long as you don't exceed the maximum tongue weight rating you're fine.

The tongue weight is not directly part of the GCVWR.

You could come up with a scenario of a 5000 lb. trailer with 100 lb. of tongue weight (but it would probably sway badly).
I just stumbled across this thread due to recent activity.

I am not a tow-er, so take this as strictly an exercise in reading comprehension and math.

But as I understand the OPs question, I believe the answer is yes, tongue weight DOES have to be included as part of the vehicle weight (GVWR) but not the GCWR. This is because part of the trailer weight is transferred to the towing vehicle.



See note 6 here:


I would think the math would go like this:
GVWR: 6050 lbs
less empty weight: 4500 lbs
leaves: 1550 lbs load available

less occupants (4 x 150lbs): 600 lbs
leaves: 950 lbs for cargo and tongue weight

less 570 lb tongue wt (max for 4 occupants)
leaves: 380 lbs for cargo in the truck

less 22 gallons of gas: 132 lbs
leaves: 248 lbs of cargo in the truck.

Trailer considerations:
10088 lbs GCWR
less 6050 lbs GVWR
leaves: 4038 lbs for max trailer weight.

If the gross vehicle weight is under 6050 lbs, the difference can be added to the trailer weight up to 4750 lbs considering 4 occupants in the above example.

This seems pretty straightforward to me. Am I missing something?
 

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Actually, I believe it's the last one in that list. I'm pretty sure that's the one I used... and i used your suggestion of that L bracket for my installation.

Kevin, if this is your installation thread, I don't find your parts list:
http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=40177&highlight=kevin_stevens

Unfortunately, your pics are still MIA.

Here's your post in another thread where you mention the bracket:
http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/showpost.php?p=589053&postcount=34

Ah yes... the tie wraps. Such a great idea for a solo install! I just used my feet and legs to do two other solo installs before you invented that method. So much easier!
 

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I have read all of this and assume I'm okay, but before I write a check for $36,000 for a new SE, can I have a little encouragement? My biggest concern is rearend sag on the Ridgeland.
People: 350 lbs.
Luggage: 100 lbs.
Gear in bed: 200 lbs.
Fuel: 150 lbs.
Total: 800 lbs.
Tongue wt.: 400 lbs.
Trailer weight: 3,000 lbs.
Ridgeline: 4600 lbs.
Am I going to be okay with this at 5,000 ft. elev.?
 

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Steve, I can't answer your question about sag, but would refer you to search out the many threads here on towing.. many of which are towing far more than you. There was a member here at one time who was towing a very heavy (way beyond spec) trailer all over the southeast. I would certainly not advise that.

IAC, I sense that you are comfy with the tow capacity of the RL, but are unsure of the sag when fully loaded. Again, all I know to tell you is to look at the various threads on towing here and ask some of those members.

Now, just out of curiosity, where 'bouts in Louisiana do you find 5000 ft elevations? :D
 

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We have relatives in Colorado and Arizona, in fact some as high as 7,000 ft. Most of our towing will be below 500 ft., but I just wanted to include the worst scenario.
My 3.4 Toyota T100 V6 with 220 ft. lbs. of torque @ 3600 rpms can handle it, but it has pretty stout leaf springs on the rear, so not much sag. I'm not sure about the Ridgeline's coil springs.
 

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I have read all of this and assume I'm okay, but before I write a check for $36,000 for a new SE, can I have a little encouragement? My biggest concern is rearend sag on the Ridgeland.
People: 350 lbs.
Luggage: 100 lbs.
Gear in bed: 200 lbs.
Fuel: 150 lbs.
Total: 800 lbs.
Tongue wt.: 400 lbs.
Trailer weight: 3,000 lbs.
Ridgeline: 4600 lbs.
Am I going to be okay with this at 5,000 ft. elev.?
On the technical side you're within the capabilities of the Ridgeline.

On the realistic side you will have significant rear end sag with 200 lbs. in the bed and 400 lbs. tongue weight.

5000 ft. elevation has a significant negative effects on any vehicle... the Ridgeline will tow what you describe but it won't be much fun and fuel mileage will be very low.

If that configuration is a regular part of your driving plans I would consider a different vehicle. If that configuration is a once or twice a year occurrence then you'll be fine.
 

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With about 200lbs of gear in the bed and 525 lbs of tongue weight on the hitch, I get about 1.5" of sag. It's enough that if I were to do it at night, I'd make myself familiar with adjusting the headlights.

Frankly, judging from a recent discussion of other "real trucks" on my boating forum, this amount of sag is not much for a half-ton with no levelling air bags. It's also consistent with a head-to-head comparison that I did with an late 1990's Silverado 1500 when my Ridgeline was new.
 

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With about 200lbs of gear in the bed and 525 lbs of tongue weight on the hitch, I get about 1.5" of sag. It's enough that if I were to do it at night, I'd make myself familiar with adjusting the headlights.

Frankly, judging from a recent discussion of other "real trucks" on my boating forum, this amount of sag is not much for a half-ton with no levelling air bags. It's also consistent with a head-to-head comparison that I did with an late 1990's Silverado 1500 when my Ridgeline was new.
That's encouraging news. It seems to me that coil spring spacers would correct your sag if they were available.
I'll bet Honda puts elec. adjustable headlights on the next Ridgeline.
My T100 sags at least an inch with 400 lb. tongue weight and 200 lbs. more or less in the bed. My T100 is about the same overall size as the Ridgeline, but weighs 900 lbs. less.
I'm amazed at how beefy the Ridgeline is. At 4,570 lbs., it is rather porky, so must be fairly robust. The Ridgeline's 1,480 lb. payload capacity is close to that of big pickups.
Hey, you are in Ontario. What elev. are you towing at?
 

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Which version of the T100 do you have Steve? My 1998 T100 SR5 Xtracab 4x4 is listed as 4040 lbs... or less than 500 lbs lighter than my RTS (4491 lbs). The T100 also has a GVWR of 6000 lbs, and a GCWR of 9500 lbs. Taking away the empty weight difference, those specs are nearly identical between the 2 vehicles.

 
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