Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

121 - 139 of 139 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I think Farther's point was that most 4wd vehicles aren't 4wd, either. The vast majority are 2wd, maybe 3wd in some situations if they have a good limited-slip diff, definitely 3wd if they have a locker, and 4wd IF they have TWO lockers. Relatively very few trucks come from the factory with two lockers, and they are high-priced packages.

So, what exactly is 4WD? What exactly is AWD? They can both be many things, and even cross the line in many areas.

Here is a detailed writeup:

The AWD system found in the Ridgeline is one of the best available, unless you're using it to pull stumps.
Even VW recognizes this problem. Which is why they’re going to base their truck off the next-gen Ranger...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts

·
Premium Member
2019 RTL awd, MSM
Joined
·
5,025 Posts
I'm well aware that there have been combo 4wd/awd setups for a number of years now. Mostly they've been on the top-level trims. They do use clutches in that part of the driveline, just like every other AWD system, so they cab be overheated if abused. However, it's a great system IF you need traditional 4wd in addition to AWD. I can think of very very few cases where I would need 4wd.

It sounds like you are asking Honda to spend the money to develop a hi/lo transfer case (something that typically defines traditional 4wd). This isnsomething that very few people will need or use. The ROI just isn't there. If you need that hi/lo transfer case, there are plenty of other options available out there.

As for Tacoma sales, that goes back to the 70s when Japanese-built trucks were first introduced to the masses in the U.S., and after a decade, people started to figure out that they were much more dependable than the U.S.-built trucks at the time. The Chicken Tax changed that, of course, but Toyota, Nissan, Mazda, Isuzu and Mitsubishi all had platforms widely available before the CT sunk it's teeth in. Chevy used the Isuzu platform to create their LUV, Ford used Mazda to create their Courier, and Dodge used Mitsubishi to create their Ram 50. However, the Japanese trucks had a good headstart on the domestic small trucks, and they were able to bring some of their QA/QC ethic from Japan to the U.S., at least for a little while.

As I mentioned earlier, Tacoma sales are driven by their reputation. Problem is, their trucks aren't what they used to be. Go visit the Tacoma forums and you'll see a lot of hate for the newer Taco. Forums are for enthusiasts, and most buyers aren't enthusiasts, so you see continued strong sales for the Taco. If you knew nothing about trucks, but wanted a smaller one and did just a little, not a lot, of research, the Taco seems like the answer. It's got relatively good looks, a great, albeit outdated, reputation and a high resale value propped up by that false reputation.

In addition, it has created an aftermarket culture that further bolsters sales. It is an easy platform to mod, similar to a Jeep Wrangler. There are many people who happily suffer with the downfalls of Jeep ownership because of that culture, that community built around the product. Same can be said for Harley-Davidson motorcycles. The culture transcends the product.

Honda is a relative newcomer to the truck market. They know it is foolish to compete directly with the body-on-frame competition, so they brought a different package to the table. One that suits many truck buyers better than their current ride, but all of the hate that began with the first-gen Ridgeline has kept a lot of would-be buyers out of the Honda market. Truck buyers are a vain lot. If it doesn't fit what they believe a truck should be, then it is relatively worthless in their minds, and they are more than happy to spread that nonsense.

Why hasn't the Tundra done better than it has? When it debuted, it had it all over the "domestic" trucks. Brand loyalty is very strong in the full-size truck market, not so much in the mid-size market. Toyota and Nissan still have a 40-year headstart on Honda, and they have a package that most truck buyers can wrap their head around.
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
23,238 Posts
I don’t think it can do this... if it could, the trim levels that come with AWD would come with skid plates standard, the way 4WD trucks do.

I can’t even buy skid plates from Honda in the aftermarket.. View attachment 411051
Sure you can. Head over to Jason Burtman's section in the vendor forum and you can find skid plates for the G1 and the G2 Ridgeline.

BTW, did you ever read the link to the Russian's G1 Ridgeline experiences that I sent you?
 
  • Like
Reactions: longboat

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Actually, I basically did have a gun to my head when I bought it.... see my comment above. The only thing I tow is a boat and trailer, which together weigh 3900 lb. Yet in the summer (like the time you use a boat) I've actually had the dash start flashing red telling me "Transmission Hot". I'm way below the tow limit, and that is inexcusable in a truck..
Pretty sure you said you went with the RL because the poor trade value being offered to you by non-Honda dealers. If that is indeed the case, how different were trade values? To say that you had a gun to your head would leave me to believe that the Honda dealer offered at least 2x what other dealers were offering.

Regardless of what the dollar value was, it seems clear to me (and likely others in this thread), that you should have sucked up the loss and gone with a vehicle that meets your needs. You may have saved yourself a few grand, but look at all of the time that you’re absolutely wasting here b!tching and moaning. Posting on this forum won’t bring about the changes that you’re looking for.

You bought the wrong vehicle. It’s as simple as that. And you did it because of your own frugality. That isn’t the fault of anybody here or at Honda. My unsolicited advice would be to go out and buy a vehicle that meets your needs instead of complaining incessantly about it to a bunch off people who can’t help you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Ridgeline - Wimpy 5,000 lb. towing capacity, wiring hookup down next to hitch instead of next to license plate, so it's sure to get dunked on a boat ramp?? Back-up camera that offers no centerline when hitch ball attached???Soccer-mom alloy wheels stolen from the Pilot??? No room for actual "truck-size" tires??? Ground clearance that a little Subaru Crosstrek can beat by 1"???? AWD instead of real 4WD????, no skid plates standard or even available from Honda??? unibody construction so it has more in common w/ a CRV, HRV, Pilot, Odyssey (insert any soccer-mom mobile here)????

Ranger Lariat - 7500 lb towing capacity, wiring hookup next to license plate where it belongs, back-up camera that automatically shows centerline when hitch ball attached, rugged attractive stock alloy wheels, real ground clearance, sophisticated REAL 4WD that can act as AWD on the road, skid plates standard on 4WD, ladder-on-frame construction to allow for better off-road performance and greater towing capacity.

I owned a 2019 Ford Ranger Lariat. Due to a family tragedy, I had to get rid of it w only 3,400 miles. The only dealer who wouldn't screw me on a trade was the Honda dealer (I assume bc the Ridgeline is slow-selling). I now own a 2019 Ridgeline RTL-E. So I have owned both.. and while the in-bed trunk is nice, and other features (e.g. truck bed audio) is goofy, it does not make up for the shortcomings that are the very reason you buy a "truck".

Oh, and can a Ridgeline do this? That's real off-roading. View attachment 410782
Ok there are things some of these mid-size trucks can do that the Ridgeline can't. I'm a contractor and I use my Ridgeline for work. I don't want a half ton because my 36'x24' heated garage with 2' shelves across the back wall would make me have to open the overhead door and pull forward to load and unload. I live in Minnesota so I would have to turn off the furnace and then reheat the garage. Full size trucks have just gotten too big. I was at the dump next to an 80's F-150 and it was the same size as the Ridgeline. So the reason for a mid-size is to be able to park in my garage and load and unload.
Why the ridgeline over a truck like your Ranger? Well the Ridgeline is almost as wide as an F-150 whereas all the other mid-size trucks are skinny. It makes no sense to have a truck too skinny for 4'x8' sheet goods. That is the deal breaker for me. You add in the trunk that holds all my day to day tools and the swing tail gate for easy access and you have a superior work truck. Not to mention the skinny cabins in those other trucks, I always feel cramped. Then you have the far superior road manners for day to day driving. I do many outdoor activities and the Ridgeline is great for dirt roads and logging roads etc. The only complaint I have is I would like more towing capacity.
There is a weird macho relationship I noticed with men who somehow attach the size and or capability of their truck with their own manhood. It just reminds me of a boy on the living room carpet playing with a little toy truck and making motor sounds. Cute or sad?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
Definitely cute, but only when it’s 5 year olds.
(-:
 
  • Like
Reactions: O-Whizz

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
RIDGELINE Towing info
From the owners manual:
2 occupants, 5000 lb, 600 lb max tongue weight
3 occupants, 4750 lb, 600 lb max tongue weight
4 occupants, 4750 lb, 570 lb max tongue weight
5 occupants, 4500 lb, 516 lb max tongue weight

The corresponding weight limits assume occupants fill seats from the front of the vehicle to the back, each occupant weighs 150 lb and each has 15 lb of cargo in the cab, pickup bed, or in-Bed Trunk. Any additional weight, including cargo and accessories, reduces the maximum trailer weight and maximum tongue load. Never exceed the gross axle weight ratings.

My question....

If I had 4 occupants (lets assume the above statement about peoples weight and how much gear they each had) and was towing something that weighed 4750 lbs but only had a 250lb tongue weight....since I would be under the 570 lb tongue weight....will that allow me to use that addtional 320 lbs for other gear?? Of course I would never carry the max but was just wondering if by not using up all the max tongue weight on a trailer could I use the leftover capacity elsewhere.

Thanks....sorry if you guys think this is a stupid question.....
Not stupid. I can't tell you how many times I've seen overloaded vehicles and their tows in various states of disrepair along the highway.Some of my lessons learned:

Weights are confusing because there is no standard MFGs use to catalog and report weight. That's particularly true of trailer MFGs. Some report dry weight, thats the trailer / vehicle capacity with out fluids. Some report gross weight, thats the weight with cargo and fluids. Others use curb weight.

Vehicles and trailers have a weight capacity as do the tires, in fact there is a NTSB sticker on the door jam that tells you what the weights are approved for each axle with the OEM tire in addition to whats in the owners manual. Trailers has the sticker, some times on the entry door or near the hook ups tha tgives axle and tire ratings You should look at that. Keep in mind that curb weight is another name for empty weight.


This is a good guide : How to Measure Towing Capacity, GVWR, GCWR - Towing 101 if you keep in mind they are trying to sell you their hitches and accessories.

As I understand it, the tongue weight should be subtracted from the overall vehicle cargo capacity. If your vehicle is rated for 1000 lbs of cargo and the tongue weight is 250lbs, you subtract the actual tongue weight from that number to arrive at a cargo and passenger number to arrive at 750lbs

You should also consider including a "safety" factor in your towing calculation. I learned that working part time at a UHaul outlet. I use a 20% safety factor when calculating gross vehicle weight. That means for a 5000 lb rated vehicle the max trailer weight including cargo ( trailers have a cargo rating) should not exceed 4000lbs.

The safety factor is a means of insuring the vehicle has enough reserve power and suspension capacity to handle all driving conditions.

Hope that helps. Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Trip report. With all the talk about towing I decided to check some numbers on a recent 400 mile trip with my son. 2017 black edition towing 2018 Winnebago Micro Minnie 22 foot TT. Ambient temp was 75 to 85. Roads were a mix highway and 2 lane rural into the foothills in western ME. Speeds 50 to 65. Top tranny fluid temp 254. Temp dropped 5 to 10 degrees when I chose D4 on the highway with some hills. Stopped at a CAT scale and weighed the tongue separately. Here are the numbers: gross weight 9540, trailer axles 3900, front axle 2500, rear axle 3140, tongue weight 540. The truck handles well, no sway and decent power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,574 Posts
254F TFT and no message? Thanks for that info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,574 Posts
I thought I remembered seeing 265F in a thread/post a while back......then someone post 230F, I think.🤷‍♂️ tgbyrne716’s post seems to confirm the higher number.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
.... Stopped at a CAT scale and weighed the tongue separately. Here are the numbers: gross weight 9540, trailer axles 3900, front axle 2500, rear axle 3140, tongue weight 540...
Nice numbers, I'm liking that 12% of GTW on the tongue, no doubt contributing to the good handling and lack of sway (y)

Did you happen to get the truck F&R axle weights without the trailer hitched? (just curious)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
Did not get the weights unhitched. Maybe next time. CAT scale was surprisingly inexpensive. $12.50
No worries, thanks. FYI if you tell the CAT Scale operator what you're doing the second un-hitched weigh is at a deeply discounted "re-weigh" rate (~$6) ;)
 
121 - 139 of 139 Posts
Top