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I was installing the brake controller in my 2022 yesterday and noticed this module tucked up behind the steering shaft bears a Toyota label. The logo is different, so perhaps this is not the same Toyota that makes the Previa and the Mister 2.

I realize there is a finite number of suppliers of automotive hardware so this isn't a huge surprise. But interesting nonetheless.

Steve
 

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This is a DC-DC converter (Honda also refers to it as a "voltage stabilization module") made by Toyota Industries Corporation, a subsidiary of Toyota Group - the company that owns Toyota Motor Corporation which makes Toyota automobiles.

The Ridgeline has used this DC-DC converter since the 2020 model year when it gained auto idle stop.

According to the service information, "the DC-DC converter boosts the voltage to compensate for voltage loss that occurs when restarting the engine in order to provide a stable power supply to each electrical component of the vehicle. The DC-DC converter is activated by a start signal from the PCM."

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“gained auto idle stop.”

Except for unwanted weight, I thought “gained” generally referred to attributes or positive references. 😊
Roger, I’m aware that you just meant “the addition…”.

Idle stop, VCM?
This is a question. Considering the starter, battery, electronic hardware, computer changes, maybe extra maintaince , how much does all this actually cost the owner? How much does it affect the EPA results? Then DI verses port injection?

For a while, the increasing sophistication seemed to be beneficial, cost-wise, such as the EFI in my 72 VW 412 wagon vs the carburetors in my ‘64 & ‘68 VW bugs and other improvements up until maybe the mid 2000’s or even early 2010’s. But now, reliability and extra costs of the “sophisticated systems “ seem to possibly be counter-productive. Appliances such as washing machines, dryers, refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, etc are supposedly more efficient but much shorter lived - 2,3,4 times shorter lived. Are vehicles going in the same direction? Our 2006 Lexus RX400h (1st year hybrid) went 11 years and over 150K miles with NOTHING going wrong. Can I expect the same with my 2022 RTL-E?
 

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Idle stop, VCM?
This is a question. Considering the starter, battery, electronic hardware, computer changes, maybe extra maintaince , how much does all this actually cost the owner? How much does it affect the EPA results? Then DI verses port injection?
When the J35 switched from port injection to direct injection and added VCM, the Ridgeline went from:

250 > 280 HP
247 > 262 lb-ft torque
17 > 21 MPG combined fuel economy

When auto idle stop was added to the Ridgeline, the combined fuel economy didn't change, but it lost 1 MPG on the highway and gained 1 MPG in the city. The 1 MPG city gain is likely the result of auto idle stop and a taller starting gear ratio. The 1 MPG highway loss must be due to the 9-speed transmission.

Appliances such as washing machines, dryers, refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, etc are supposedly more efficient but much shorter lived - 2,3,4 times shorter lived.
There's no money in making things last as long as they used to. :)
 

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Roger, et al,
My previous Honda before my 2017 RTL-E was a 2013 V-6 Accord. Port injected and 278 hp. We kept it between 2-3 years and sold only because we needed a larger vehicle (SUV). A very close friend bought it. Now, with 105,000miles, it still is trouble-free. Right or wrong (likely wrong) , I changed the oil every 5K miles. Still looked clean.
So, the current RL engine (DI as most know) has 280 hp while the ‘13 Accord had only 2 hp less. If the Accord engine were used in the “truck” maybe it would have been retuned for more torque/less max hp.

Still, what I saw was a 2 hp increase in the ‘17 RL (over the ‘13 Accord) with DI FIs that had to be replaced (‘17) , likelihood of carbon buildup on the back of the valves, potentially more frequent FI replacements plus FI pump operating at a much higher pressure and possible/likely? more frequent replacement. Probably, more expensive injectors and fuel pump. On the surface, this appeared to be more loss than gain.

On the surface, the 9-sp seems like it would be at least as fuel efficient as the 6-sp; but, my ‘22 gets a little less milage than my ‘17. The controllability of the 9-sp outweighs any other factors, imo. The confidence in the 9-sp greatly outweighs the 6-sp, imo.

The front end of the ‘21-‘23 looks more draggy than the ’17–‘20. The drag index just looks higher.
 
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